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Publication numberUS3196268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateNov 6, 1961
Priority dateNov 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3196268 A, US 3196268A, US-A-3196268, US3196268 A, US3196268A
InventorsWilliam Mack
Original AssigneeGulton Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flashlight
US 3196268 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

& 0

fig g lg July 20, 1965 w. MACK 3,196,268

FLASHLIGHT Filed NOV. 6, 1961 4 SheetS-Shel'. 1

'5 INVENTOR.

WILLIAM M CK "FM I ATTORN W. MACK FLASHLIGHT July 20,- 1965 Filed Nov. 6, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 JNVENTOR.

WlLLlQM MQQK My V ATTORNEY W. MACK FLASHLIGHT Jul 20, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 6. 1961 INVENTOR. WILLIAM M CK BY UM,

QTTORN EH United States Patent Office fldflflifl Patented July 2%, 1965 3,1%,268 *LASHLIGHT William Mach, Eirnhurst, NXZ, assignor to Gulton Industries, Inc, Metuchcn, Nah, a corporation of New Jersey Filed Nov. 6, 1961, Scr. No. 156,495 13 flaims. (Cl. fill-10.6

This invention relates to flashlights, and more particularly, to flat type flashlights which may be conveniently carried in pockets, purses or the like.

In the past, flashlights, which utilized large lamps and were capable of projecting a spot light or concentrated beam, have been bulky and generally cylindrical in configuration and have usually been provided with circular lenses and reflectors for directing the beam from the large lamps. Also, in the past, flashlights of the flat type, which were less bulky and capable of being carried in pockets, purses or the like, were not capable of projecting a spot light or concentrated beam, and used small lamps without lenses or reflectors for providing a flood of light.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a flat type flashlight which is compact and conveniently carried in pockets, purses or the like, and which is provided with a large lamp, lens and reflector which are capable of projecting a spot light or concentrated beam and of providing a uniform flood of light about the spot light just as in the more cumbersome and bulky cylindrical flashlights.

Briefly, in accordance with this object of the invention, the flat type flashlight includes an elongated housing which is wider than it is thick, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing at one end thereof and provided with a lens, and a large lamp having a filament and arranged within the reflector behind the lens. The reflector has an edge adjacent the lens which defines a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide and which is preferably substantially commensurate with the width and thickness of the elongated housing. The reflector is provided with an elongated parabolic reflecting surface extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a focused spot or beam of light and a flood of light therearound.

The reflector is also provided with outwardly inclined concave surfaces extending from the sides of the parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening. Preferably, the outwardly inclined concave surfaces of the reflector are reflecting surfaces and are preferably inclined at an angle of the order of 7 for providing a substantially uniform floor of light around the projected spot or beam even though the light emitting opening of the reflector and the lens are not round but elongated. Preferably, the inclined concave reflecting surfaces are also fluted to assist in the reflection and even distribution of the flood of light about the projected spot or beam. If desired, one or both of the concave inclined surfaces may be made light transmitting to provide side lighting of the flat type flashlight, and colored side lighting may be thus obtained by suitably coloring the concave inclined surfaces of the reflector.

The usual large lamp for flashlights has an elongated filament which is transverse to the axis of the lamp and, in accordance with this invention, means are provided for positioning the lamp with the elongated filament thereof extending lengthwise between the inclined surfaces of the reflector to direct maximum light to the parabolic reflecting surface for projecting a beam of maximum brightness.

A further object of this invention is to provide a flash light with an adjustable focusing mechanism for varying at will the projected light between a flood of light and a spot or concentrated beam. Preferably, this adjustment is brought about by manipulating the switch which turns on and off the electrical energy to the filament of the lamp. Toward this end, the lamp is preferably slidably mounted in the reflector and spring means are provided for normally urging the lamp outwardly to a point where the filament is beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface. The switch, which is carried by the housing, is provided with means for adjustably positioning the lamp against the action of the spring means between positions where the filament thereof is outwardly beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface and where the filament thereof is at the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface.

Also, in accordance with this invention, an adjusting screw is preferably carried by the housing to provide an adjustable stop for fixing the position of the lamp where the filament is at the focal point of the parabolic surface so as to provide for accurate focusing and projection of the sharpest spot or beam. The focusing features of this invention are particularly adaptable for use in the flat type flashlight of this invention and structurally and functionally cooperate therewith for providing a unique flashlight having unusual characteristics.

The aforementioned features of this invention are admirably suited for use in flashlights having rechargeable batteries,such as nickel-cadmium batteries or the like, which may be charged from time to time by the usual house current. Toward this end, the elongated housing is formed of two separate parts, one part containing the aforementioned reflector, lens, lamp, switch and focusing means, and the other part containing the rechargeable batteries, rectifier and voltage control and, also, first electrical connections for charging the batteries from the usual house current, and second separate electrical connections engaging electrical connections in the first part, when the two parts are brought together, for supplying electrical energy from the batteries to the switch and lamp filament of the first part.

Further objects of this invention reside in the details of construction of the flashlights of this invention and in the cooperative relationships between the component parts thereof.

These and other objects, advantages, features and uses of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reference to the following description and claims when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a rechargeable flashlight employing the teachings of the invention wherein the battery, rectifier and dropping capacitor are shown diagrammatically.

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the embodiment of FIG. 1, viewed in the direction of the arrow 2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of 16. 1, viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of FIG. 3, viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 55 of PEG. 3, viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line E6 of FIG. 4, viewed in the direction of the arrows.

voltage dropping capacitor 16%.

FIGS. 7, 7A and 8 are diagrammatic views which illustrate the theory underlying the invention.

FIG. 9 is a perspective diagrammatic view showing the light areas obtained when the rechargeable flashlight of this invention is in both the focused and unfocused conditions, and

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view, similar to those of FIGS. 4 and 5, of a fixed focus, flat, flashlight of this invention.

In the drawings, wherein, for the purpose of illustration, are shown preferred embodiments of the invention, the numeral 1t? designates one form of the rechargeable flashlight of this invention. In FIG. 1, flashlight 19 is seen to comprise a pair of housings 12 and 14 joined along the line 16. Housings 112 and 14 are separable so that the rechargeable battery mounted in housing 14 (mounting details not shown) may be charged from the usual A.-C. house supply. Within housing 14, there is contained rechargeable battery 1%, preferably of the nickel-cadmium or similar type, a bridge rectifier M2 and .These components are arranged and connected so that the battery may be charged from the available house supply. The dropping capacitor serves to lower the voltage from the supply to a Value proper to charge the battery Without overheating or other deleterious effects. This charging circuit is connected to a A.-C. prongs 6%? which are aflixed to housing 1.4 and nest within the housing 12, as shown in FIG. 5, when the two housings are in their closed, mated position. The battery is directly connected to a pairof pin type receptacles 34a and 36a in housing 14 which are positioned so as to receive pins 34 and 36 carried by the housing 12, and through them and associated electrical circuits, which will be described in detail later, apply the necessary voltage to lamp 22. By way of illustration and not by way of limitation of the scope of my invention, the following is an example of the characteristics of the electrical components contained in housing 14: Battery- Gulton type VO-SOO with an output voltage of approximately 2.4 volts; rectifier-selenium, 50 ma. D.C. continuous output with 4 volts input; dropping capacitorl microfarad, 260 volts (working). 7

The battery charging and output circuits are preferably connected as shown in FIG. 1: one side of the source of A.-C. voltage is connected to one terminal of capacitor 1%; the rectifiers are connected in bridge circuit 192; the other side of the source of A.-C'. voltage is connected to one terminal of rectifier bridge circuit N2; the other terminal of capacitor 1% is connected tothe terminal of bridge circuit 102 opposite that to which the source of A.-C. voltage is directly connected; battery 164 is connected to the other two terminals of bridge circuit lltlZ and to receptacles 34a and 35a.

In FIGS. 2, 4 and the numeral 18 designates the paraboloid reflector, and the numerals Ztldesignate the outwardly inclined concave surfaces of the reflector assembly. The outwardly inclined concave surfaces 2% are fluted and are flared outward from paraboloid reflector 18 at an angle of the order of 7. Lamp 22 is mounted in front of paraboloid reflector 18 such that its filament 26 is substantially perpendicular to the surfaces 2%. This position is guaranteed by orienting and maintaining the position of a notch 24- in the flange 27 of the lamp 22 as shown in FIG. 2. Notch Z4 cooperates with a keyway 25 in a metallicsleeve 42 of a lamp housing 30 which in turn is held in place by cooperating with a key 23 formed in the reflector 18, thereby holding lamp 22 in fixed rela- The light, which emanates directly from the filament 26. and which does not strike the paraboloid reflector 1%, is projected in a broad conical beam which is concentric with the concentrated spot from the paraboloid reflector 13. However, in order to prevent this broad secondary beam from acquiring the somewhat elongated shape of the light emitting aperture, it is necessary to spread the secondary beam emanating from the somewhat flattened concave sides 29 of the reflector 1S. plished by providing the side surfaces 20 and the flutes thereon.

When it is desired that light from bulb 2 2 be transmitted through either or both of the fluted concave side surfaces 24 the plastic from which they are formed is made light transmitting, such as'translucent or transparent (red, white or any other color). In such a 'case (FIG. 7A) the flutes are actually a series of parallel negative meniscus lenses which diffuse in one direction only (outward from the bulb). Each flute serves as a diffuser of the light emanating directly from the bulb filament thereby providing a good beacon (red or otherwise). j In the case where a beacon is not desired and only a flashlight is wanted, the flutes are front surface metallized 7). The flutes nowform a series of parallel elongated concave reflectors which reflect the light emanating from the filament in a diffuse pattern. V

In FIG. 8, the long and short dimensions of the reflector are shown superimposed in elevation. The solid lines emanating from the filament are the direct rays, the dashed lines are those which are reflected from the top of the fluted concave sides 20, and the dotted lines are those which are reflected from a lower portion of the fluted concave sides 26. It can be seen that the resulting beam from the flashlight will be substantially circular and can be made exactly circular by suitable choice of reflector dimensions. a I

In'this manner the objectionable caustic cusps and filament striations around the edge of the concentrated spot (from the parabolic reflector) are eliminated. The arrangement of the flutes in a wide are forms a larger multisection concave reflector which serves to concentrate the diffuse reflected light from the individual flutes so that, their light is projected from the reflector aperture in a wide uniformly illuminated arc which fills in the light around the concentrated spot and thereby forming a wide conical secondary beam. "By this means I have been able to compensate for the flattened shape of the reflector aperture. A similar effect may also be obtained if the concave surfaces 26 are of a sandblasted texture instead of fluted but the advantage of fiuting resides'in the fact that fluting produces a more highly reflective surface. In addition, the concave surfaces may be made transparent, if desired. This cannot be done if those surfaces are sandblasted. For example, the light transmitting sides maybe made of colored glass or plastic and theflashlight may be used as a combined spotlight and warning light. Furthermore, if a rough diffusing texture were used instead of fluting, the transmission of the light. would be less efficient It is within'the contemplation of this invention to provide flashlights with and without transparent side reflectors.

In FIG. 7, the fluted concave surface Ztlis of the nontransparent or reflective type. A single level of rays is shown in the figure in order to simplify the illustration of the three dimensional aspect. FIGS. 7 and 8 should be considered together. The direct rays from the filament 26 have been designated 79 and the rays reflected by the fluted surfaces 20 have been designated 74. Considering FIG. 7, all the reflected rays 74 at a particular level are focused at some point outside of the flashlight. These points vary in position from level to level so that when the rays reflected from'the continuous area of each of the several reflectors formed by the flutes are combined, a solid area of light is obtained.

This is accom- In FIG. 8, 26a designates the position of the filament when the flashlight is focused and 26b designates the filament position when the flashlight is unfocused or spread. Circles 3166a and ltiSa' in FIG. 9 respectively designate the inner spot and the outer spread of the light which are obtained when the filament is in the position of 26a of FIG. 8. Circles afifib and 198i) respectively designate the inner spot and the outer spread of light which are obtained when the filament is in the position of 26b of FIG. 8.

In FIG. 7A, fluted concave surface 23' is transparent and the flutes are a series of joined negative meniscus lenses. Rays 7i) from the filament of the lamp (shown on only a single level in the figure) are diverged by the lens as shown by rays 72. It can be seen that the rays at .all the levels of each of the lenses will be diverged by the lens and a continuous area of light is obtained from each lens. The areas of light from the various lenses :are likewise continuous and a continuous light area is obtained.

In FIG. 3, there is shown a view of the rear of housing 12 with housing 14 disconnected therefrom. Pins 34 and 36 are provided to supply the low voltage for operating the flashlight when plugged into the pair of matched receptacles 34a and 35a in housing 14 (FIG. 5). Pin 36 is connected by means of a conductor 37 to a switch 28 and the pin 34 is connected by means of a pivoted conductor strip 32 to the center contact of the lamp 22 through a spring 46 (FiGS. 4 and 5). Conductor 37 is preferably a single metallic casting with the pin 36, and the casting is held in place in the housing by means of a spring lockwasher 37a. Bolts 62 are provided to hold the reflector assembly in position in housing 12. The pin 34 is riveted in place and is in electrical contact with the pivoted conductor strip 32. A magnet 38 is mounted within housing 12 as shown in FIG. 3 and is provided with a pair of magnetic pole pieces 4% which project outside of the housing 12. These pole pieces are used to amx the flashlight to any magnetic surface. For example, the flashlight may be placed on the instrument panel of an automobile without the necessity of providing any hooks or other support means.

The elements of switch 28, which is formed of metal, and the electrical operation of the flashlight are illus- Irated in FIG. 4. Switch 28 is seen to comprise body portion 53, pivot pin 51, locking slide 52, dog 54 and locking slide control 58. Switch 23 is pivotally held in a yoke 39 by means of the conductive pivot pin 51. The yoke 39 is formed of conductive material and is a part of casting 37. The switch 2% is in the OFF position when it is in the dotted position of FIG. 4. It is ON in the position illustrated by the solid lines of FIG. 4. The lamp housing 3! comprises a metal sleeve or tube 42, a plastic tube 44 and a metal spring 46. The metal tube 42 is provided with a lip 55 which cooperates with the dog 54 on switch 28 (the details of this cooperation will be set forth later in the description). The metal tube -2 is cut away, as shown in FIG. 5, so that the prongs 6t nest adjacent to the plastic tube 44 free from electrical contact when the housings 12 and 14 are connected together.

When the switch 28 is depressed to its ON position, the dog 54 comes in contact with the lip 56 and the circuit between pins 3 3 and Sr? is closed through the lamp 22. The electrical circuit is as follows: from the pin 34 through the pivoted conductor strip 32 to the spring 46 and then to the center contact of lamp 22; and the pin 36 to the switch 28 through the conductor 37; then when the switch is ON, to the metal tube 42 and then to the flange 27 which is part of the outer shell of the lamp 22. Thus, the electrical circuit through the filament 26 is completed when the switch 28 is ON, and the lamp 22 will light when there is voltage present across the pins 34 and 36. The dog 54 pushes against the lip 56 and as the switch 23 is moved inwardly toward the lamp 22, the lamp housing 30 is moved toward the rear of housing 12. This causes lamp 22 to be moved closer to the focus of paraboloid reflector 18. At the focus of the paraboloid, the spot from the lamp is most concentrated. The limit of rearward travel of the lamp housing Bil is determined by the position of a screw 57 which is adjusted at the factory, so that in the rearmost position of the lamp 22, its filament 26 is placed at the focus of paraboloid l8. Screw 57 is threaded into casting S7. A transparent plastic face 21 of Plexiglas or similar material is provided to protect the reflector and the lamp from dirt and other deleterious effects.

When the switch 28 is moved to its OFF position, the electrical and mechanical contact between switch 2-8 and metal tube 42 is broken. When this mechanical contact is broken, the spring 46 urges the lamp 222 forward. The flange 27 of the lamp, which is nested against the inturned lip of the metal tube 4-2, pushes the metal tube 42 forward until the lip 55 is stopped against the rear of the reflector boss (FIG. 4). The mechanical action of the spring 46 also serves to insure that there will be good electrical contact made when the switch 28 is ON.

When the switch 28 is ON, the spring 46 also pushes the flange 27 against the inturned flange of the metal tube 42. Thus, with the switch 23 holding the metal tube 42 toward the rear and with the spring 46 pushing the flange 27 forward, good electrical contact is maintained.

To change the lamp in the flashlight of FIGS. 1 through 6, the conductive strip 32 is pivoted from the position shown in the solid lines of FIG. 3 to that of the broken lines. Then, the plastic tube 44 with the spring 46' and lamp 22 are removed through the rear of the housing 12. The lamp is removed from the plastic tube and a new lamp is inserted in the lamp housing so that lamp notch 24 matches with the key formed .in the lamp housing. Then the plastic tube and spring are inserted in lamp housing 3! so that filament 26 is oriented as shown in FIG. 2. The correct orientation of the lamp housing with respect to the housing 12 is maintained by the cooperative keys and keyways described above in connection with PEG. 6.

To turn the flashlight OFF, the user pushes down on the rearmost section of the body 50 so that the switch 28 is raised to the dotted position of HG. 4. This action opens the electrical circuit between the dog 54 and the lip 56 and thereby disconnects the lamp from the battery. To keep the switch from being turned ON while being carried, the locking slide control 58 is pushed forward so that the locking slide 52 rest-s against the exterior of the housing 12. This prevents the switch from being depressed accidentally.

in FIG. 10, the numeral 119 generally designates a fixed focus flashlight produced in accordance with the teachings of this invention. Housings 112 and 11 i mate together as did housings i2 and 14 of the above described embodiment. The battery, rectifier, and voltage dropping capacitor are mounted in housing 11- and connected in a manner similar to that above described. The housing 112 is formed in two sections 112a and 11222. The housing section 1325 contains a parabolic reflector 118, fluted side surfaces 129 and transparent plastic cover I121. The housing section 112a contains a switch 128, a lamp 122 and the other associated elements required for proper operation of the flashlight. The opening in the reflector 113 is provided with an integrally molded key which engages a notch in the lamp flange 127. The notch and hey are located with respect to the reflector 118 so that the long dimension of the filament 126 is substantially perpendicular to the long dimension of the reflector 118. I prefer to form housing part 112a of a single mold, in which case the tubular portion is integral with the balance of housing partv 112a. Housings 112a and 11% are preferably cemented together.

Contact pins 134 and 136 mate in a pair of receptacles '5 (not shown) in housing l. These receptacles are connected to the batterysiniila'r to the manner in which battery 1% is connected to receptacles and 36a in FIG. 1. Pin 11% is an integral part of assembly 133 which is held in position on a fixed flattened pin 131. A spring contact 132, which makes contact with the center contact of lamp 122, is staked in the assembly 333 as shown in FIG. 10. Spring contact 132-, assembly 133 and pin are all formed of conductive material, such as metal.

Switch 128 is formed of nonconductive material such as plastic and is knurled as shown in 10. A yoke 139, of plastic or similar material, is mounted in the housing part 112a. A pin 151 is provided to hold switch 128 in yoke 139. The yolre 13? is provided with an opening therein to restrict the rotation of the switch 128. A stop 146 is formed on the switch 122 and its limit of movement is determined by the edges 1 2i and 1 52 of the opening in the yoke 13% i A pin 134 is riveted in position, as shown in E16. 10, and it makes contact with a conductive spring assembly 14441-146147. Springs 144a and 147 are yoked together by the yoke 146 so that movement of one of them moves the other. In the GFP position, the spring 144a rests against an edge 14d of switch 1 2% and the spring 147 is out of engagement with the lamp flange 327. Contact is made between the pin 134 and the lamp flange 127 as follows: the switch 128 is rotated counterclockwise until the stop 344i is against the stop edge 14-23. In this position, the semicircular end of the spring 144a is nested in curve 143 of the switch 128. When this occurs, the springs 144a and 147 are forced downward so that the spring 147 is in contact with the lamp flange 1257.

completed through the lamp.

When the housings 112 and 114 are nested together,

the A.-C. prongs 169 are held in place by molded projections 145a and serve to keep the assembly 133 in the position illustrated in FIG. 10. To charge the battery in housing 14, the housings are separated and the A.-C. prongs 16%) are connected to the usual electrical house supply.

To change the lamp in the fixed focus flashlight illustrated in FIG. 10, the housings are separated and the pin 136 is slid upwards until the flattened pin 131 is in the large opening in the assembly 133. Then, assembly 133 is pivoted down and toward the right of the figure so that contact spring 132 is no longer behind lamp 122.

.Now the lamplZZ may be removed through the opening part 112a and a new lamp inserted therein. Thereafter, the assembly 133 is pivoted into position behind the lamp and then moved downwardly on the flattened pin 131 to lock the same in place with the spring 132 engaging the center contact of the lamp.

The flashlight llll is of the fixed focus type and the position of the filament 126 with respect to the reflector 118 is set at the factory to obtain an average-sized spot for the use for which the device is intended. The lamp can be located at the focus of the parabolic reflector or at some other desired position;

The charging system and lamp filament orientation of the flashlight of FIG. 10 are like those described for the flashlights of FIGS. 1 through 6. It is also within the contemplation of the invention to utilize the reflectors. and lamp filament orientation taught herein in flashlights which use the usual nonrechargeable dry cells. 'Trans:

7 parent plastic covers 21 (FlGS. 4 and and 121 (FIG;

) are provided to protect the reflectors and lamps from being damaged in use.

\Vhile I have disclosed my invention in relation to specificrexamples and in specific embodiments, I do not wish to be limited thereto, for obvious modifications will occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly faco cl ing concave reflector carried by the housing, and a light emitting lamp centrally carried within the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening'for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined concave surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening. 7 y

2. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing'concave reflector carried by the housing, and a light emitting lamp centrally carried within the reflector with In this manner, the electrical circuit from the battery is the longitudinal axis of the lamp concentric with the central axis of the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the lamp and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is Wide, the reflecting surface of said reflector being parabolic in all directions about the longitudinal axis of the lamp and parabolically extending to the edge of the reflector at the short dimen sions of the'light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light thcrearound, and said reflector having outwardly inclined concave surfaces ex tending from the parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening.

3. A flat type flashlight comprisingan elongated housing which is longer than it is' wide and wider than it is thick, a light emitting lamp arranged along the longitudinal central axis of the housing adjacent one end of the housing, and an outwardly facing concave reflector about said lamp and carried by the housing at said one end thereof concentrically with the central axis thereof, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the central axis of the housing and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide and which is substantially commensurate with the width and thickness of the housing, said reflector hav ing an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the central axis and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave, surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening. 7

4. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing, and a light emitting lamp centrally carried within the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and reflector, extending through the lamp and extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a substantially uniform flood of light around the spotlight. a

5. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing, and a light emitting lamp centrally carried withinthe reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening, at least one of said outwardly inclined, concave, surfaces being light transmitting.

6. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing, and a light emitting lamp centrally carried within the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of li' gt. and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave, fluted surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening to assist in the reflection and even distribution of the flood of light.

7. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing, a light emitting lamp having an elongated transversely arranged filament centrally carried within the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave, surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening, and means for positioning the lamp with the elongated filament thereof extending lengthwise between the outwardly inclined, concave, surfaces of the reflector.

8. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing and having a parabolic reflecting surface, a lamp having a filament, a carrier for the lamp having a contact connected to the lamp and slidably mounted in the reflector, spring means normally urging the lamp and carrier outwardly to a point where the filament is beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface, a manually operated switch carried by the housing for turning on and off electrical energy to the filament of the lamp, said switch having means normally separated from the contact on said carrier but movable initially to engage said contact to turn on the lamp and movable further for adjustably positioning said lamp and carrier against the action of the spring means between the position where the filament thereof is outwardly beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface and a position where the filament thereof is at the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface.

9. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing and having a parabolic reflecting surface a lamp having a filament and slidably mounted in the reflector, spring means normally urging the lamp outwardly to a point Where the filament is beyond the focal point of the parabolic refleeting surface, a switch carried by the housing for turning on and off electrical energy to the filament of the lamp, said switch having means which is operative when the switch turns on the electrical energy to the filament for adjustably positioning said lamp against the action of the spring means between positions where the filament thereof is outwardly beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface and where the filament thereof is at the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface, and an adjusting screw carried by the housing to provide an 1% adjustable stop for fixing the position of the lamp where the filament is at the focal point of the parabolic surface.

19. A flashlight comprising a housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector carried by the housing, a light emitting lamp having a filament and centrally slidably mounted in the reflector, spring means normally urging the lamp outwardly to a point where the filament is beyond the focal point of the reflector, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the lamp and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emit ting opening, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surfaces to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening, a switch carried by the housing for turning on and off elec trical energy to the filament of the lamp, said switch having means which is operative when the switch turns on the electrical energy to the filament for adjusta'bly positioning said lamp against the action of the spring means etween positions where the filament thereof is outward ly beyond the focal point of the parabolic reflecting sur face and where the filament thereof is at the focal point of the parabolic reflecting surface.

11. A flat type flashlight comprising an elongated housing which is longer than it is wide and wider than it is thick, 21 light emitting lamp arranged along the longitudinal central axis of the housing adjacent one end of the housing, and an outwardly facing concave reflector about said lamp and carried by the housing at said one end thereof concentrically with the central axis thereof, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the central axis of the housing and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide and which is substantially commensurate with the width and thickness of the housing, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the central axis and extending at its end to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave surfaces, at least one of which is light transmitting, extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening.

12. A flat type flashlight comprising an elongated housing which is longer than it is wide and wider than it is thick, a light mitting lamp arranged along the longitudinal central axis of the housing adjacent one end of the housing, and an outwardly facing concave reflector about said lamp and carried by the housing at said one end thereof concentrically with the central axis thereof, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the central axis of the housing and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide and which is substantially commensurate with the width and thickness of the housing, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the central axis and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light therearound, said reflector having outwardly inclined, concave, fluted, surfaces extending from the sides of the elongated parabolic reflecting surface to the edge of the reflector at the long dimensions of the light emitting opening.

13. A flat type flashlight comprising an elongated housing which is longer than it is wide and wider than it is thick, 21 light emitting lamp, having an elongated transversely arranged filament, arranged along the longitudinal central axis of the housing adjacent one end of the housing, an outwardly facing concave reflector about said lamp and carried by the housing at said one end thereof concentrically with the central axis thereof, said reflector having an edge lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the central axis of the housing and defining a light emitting opening which is longer than it is wide and which is substantially commensurate with the Width and thickness of the housing, said reflector having an elongated reflecting surface parabolic in all directions about the central axis and extending at its ends to the edge of the reflector at the short dimensions of the light emitting opening for providing a spot of light and a flood of light there- .around, said reflector having outwardly inclined, con- Ret'erenees Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Arnes 240-103 Jones 240-1069 Allen 240-4136 Leser 240-1069 Bean 240-4137 Snyder 24-0-1069 Ayotte 240-10. 69 Nixon 240-1061 Greppin 240-4138 Brouwer 240-4138 NORTON ANSI-1BR, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE NlNAS, JR., Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4987523 *Feb 28, 1990Jan 22, 1991Bruce Wayne LindaburyAdjustable beam focus flashlight
US5171086 *Mar 22, 1991Dec 15, 1992Baloochi Mohsen KHand held adjustable focus flash light
US5678921 *Dec 6, 1994Oct 21, 1997Bright Star Industries, Inc.Flashlight
DE3523005A1 *Jun 27, 1985Jan 8, 1987Sassmannshausen KnutFlat pocket lamp having a concave mirror reflector and cells arranged juxtaposed for the purpose of power supply
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/188
International ClassificationF21L4/00, F21Y101/00, F21V23/04, F21V14/02, F21V13/00, F21V14/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V23/0414, F21V14/025, F21L4/005
European ClassificationF21L4/00P, F21V23/04L, F21V14/02L