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Publication numberUS3196382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateAug 7, 1962
Priority dateAug 7, 1962
Publication numberUS 3196382 A, US 3196382A, US-A-3196382, US3196382 A, US3196382A
InventorsMorello Jr William
Original AssigneeItt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crimp type coaxial cable connector
US 3196382 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 20, 1965 w. MoREL-Lo, ,JR

CRIMP TYPE COAXIAL CABLE CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 7, 1962 July 20, 1965 w. MoRELLo, JR 3,196,382

RIMP TYPE COAXIAL CABLE CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed. Aug. 7, 1962 mvENToR 5M/,QM Moes o, fle.

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UnitedStates Patent O CRIME TYPE CAXIAL CABLE CNNECTQR William Morello, Jr., Wakefield, Mass., assigner, by rnesne assignments, to international Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York, N517., a corporation of Maryland Filed Aug. 7, 1962, Ser. No. 215,354 12 Claims. (Cl. 339-177) The present invention relates to coaxial cable electrical connectors, and it relates particularly to a novel coaxial cable connector construction especially useful for miniature and subminiature connectors, but not necessarily limited to these small connectors, wherein the cable shield or braid is crimped to an outer conductivemember of the connector, and this same crimp serves also to axially fix the center contact, which has been previously joined vto the center conductor of the cable, within the connector member.

Positive axial positioning of the center Contact in a coaxial cable connector member presents a difficult problem, particularly in the case of miniature and sub-miniature size connectors. The center contact must be joined vto the bared end of the center conductor of the cable,

as by soldering or crimping, before the center contact is installed in the operative position in the connector member. It is conventional practice in many connectors to merely rely for axial positioning of the center contact upon axial rigidity of the dielectric layer of the coaxial cable, coupled with attachment of the exterior layer of the cable and the cable braid to the connector member, without any direct or positive axial retention of the center contact. Such positioning of the center contact is not reliable, particularly in the case of very small coaxial cable connectors, because of variations in the trimming of the end of the dielectric layer of the cable and because of flexibility in the cable and variations in the attachment of the cable in the connector member. Prior art attempts to positively fix the center Contact against axial shifting in the connector member usually involved relatively bulky or complicated structure which was completely unsuitable for use in small coaxial cable connectors such as the miniature and sub-miniature sizes.

In coaxial cable electrical connectors of all types, and particularly in the small types, it has been found advantageous to electrically and mechanically couple the cable shield or braid to the body or outer conductor of the connector member by disposing the braid radially between an inside relatively rigid ferrule and an outside crimp ring, and crimping the outside ring radially inwardly to effect the connection. In the present invention this type of crimped connection of the cable braid to the connector body is utilized by novel structure of the connector member to also positively axially fix the center contact relative to the shell or body of the connector member.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a coaxial cable electrical connector wherein the cable shield or braid is electrically and mechanically coupled to the connector member by means of-a crimp ring or sleeve, and wherein this crimped connection additionally serves to positively axially fix the center contact within the shell or body of the connector member. Another object of the present invention is to provide a coaxial cable electrical connector of the character described which is compact and wherein the parts have relatively small radial dimensions, and which is therefore particularly suited for relatively small connector applications, such as the miniature and sub-miniature sizes.

A further obiect of the present invention is to provide a crimp type coaxial cable electrical connector of the character described wherein the crimp ring has a novel ribbed construction which tends to bunchup the cable 3,196,382 Patented July 20, 1965 ICC Vmembers, embodying the present invention, the connector members being axially separated.

FG. 2 is a central longitudinal section similar to FIG. 1, but with the receptacle and plug connector members operatively interengaged.

FIGS. 3, 4, 5 and 6 illustrate steps in the assembly of the parts of the receptacle connector member shown in FIGS. l and 2.

FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the presently preferred crimp ring, center contact positioning sleeve and insulator bead forming parts of the present invention.

Referring to the drawings and at first particularly to FIG. 1 thereof, a coaxial cable connector 10 is illustrated, including a receptacle member 12 and a plug member 14, both of which employ the crimp connection according to the present invention. The connector members 12 and 14 are interengageable to effect a coaxial cable electrical connection.

The receptacle connector member 12 includes a conductive metal body or shell 16 of stepped configuration, having an intermediate mounting portion 18, a diametrically enlarged forward skirt portion 26 extending forwardly from the mounting portion 18, and a diametrically constricted cylindrical ferrule portion 22 extending rearwardly from the mounting portion 18. An external flange 24 is provided proximate the juncture between the portions 1S and 22 of shell 16, and a forwardly facing internal shoulder 26 is provided in the same region.

An annular insulator 28 is mounted in the mounting portion'lS of shell 16, being axially positioned by abutment against the forwardly facing shoulder 26 in the shell 16. Insulator 23 has an axial bore 30 therethrough, with a shallow rearward counterbore 32, and a chamfer or bevel 34 at the forward end of the bore 30. Insulator 28 has a reduced diameter, tubular forward portion 36 within the forward skirt portion 20 of shell 16.

The insulator 23 is permanently retained in this operative position in the receptacle shell 16, and is circumferentially sealed with respect to the shell 16, by provision of an annular groove 38 in the periphery of insulator 28, and an opening 4l? through the intermediate mounting portion 18 of shell 16 which communicates with the annular groove 38. Using a hypodermic syringe, a bonding and sealing material is injected through the opening 4@ and into the annular groove 38 of the insulator, and when this material hardens or cures, a permanent, sealed bond is effected.

Although the present invention is not limited to use of any particular materials, a satisfactory material for the insulator 28 has been found to be Tellom and a suitable bonding and sealing material for injection into the annular groove 38 is Eccobond 45 Sc., this material being cured by heating to about F. for about 15 minutes.

The center contact member 42 embodied in the receptacle member 12 is a pin contact member, including a forward contacting pin portion 44 and a tubular rearward portion 46 within which the bared center conductor of the coaxial cable may be crimped or soldered. The center Contact member 42 is disposed entirely within the bore 3d of insulator Zd, the chamfer or bevel 34 at the forward end of bore 3d providing a lead-in guide for directing an opposing socket contact member into engagement with the forward contacting pin portion ltd of contact member d2.

The coaxial cable i8 which is both mechanically and electrically connected to the receptacle connector member l2 includes a center conductor Sti, a dielectric layer 52 disposed about the center conductor du, a braided tubular outer conductor or shield 54 disposed concentrically about the dielectric 52, and an outer cable jacket S6 composed of insulation material disposed about the outer conductor 54. The dielectric layer 52 is trimmed back from the end of center conductor 50 so that a bared end portion of the center conductor 50 is exposed. Likewise, the outer conductor d is trimmed back from the end of dielectric layer S2, and the cable jacket 56 is trimmed back from the end of the outer conductor 54.

A cup-shaped insulator bead 5'7 is provided as part of the structure for axially positioning the center contact member 4t2 within the receptacle connector member l2. Bead 57 has a bottom wall 58 and an annular skirt portion 59, with a central opening in the bottom wall 58 that vis sufficiently large to permit the center conductor 5d to pass therethrough but which is smaller in diameter than the rearward portion 46 of centercontact member 42. The insulator bead 57 is slipped over the bared end of center conductor 5d with the annular skirt portion 59 of the bead facing rearwardly, and the bead 57 is pushed rearwardly until the bottom wall 5S thereof abuts against the end of the dielectric layer 52 ofthe coaxial cable.

The diameter of the annular skirt portion 59 of bead 57 Y is such that it fits over the end of the dielectric layer 52.

After the insulator bead 57' is thus positioned over the end of the dielectric layer 52 of the cable, with the bared center conductor Sti projecting forwardly therefrom, the bared end of the center conductor is inserted into the ber 42 and is permanently aiiixed in this position, preferably by crimping, but by other means if desired, as by soldering.

` is slipped rearwardly over the dielectric layer 52 and under the braided outer conductor 5d of cable 48, expanding the braided outer conductor 54.

The positioning sleeve 6d has a forward counterbore 62 within which the skirt portion 59 of insulator bead 57 is received, and has a rearward head portion 64 defining a forwardly facing shoulder 66 and having a tapered, This tapered surfacek frusto-conical rearward surface 63. 68 is helpful in that it peels the braided outer conductor 54 of the coaxiall cable outwardly as the positioning sleeve eti is slidably engaged between the dielectric layer 52 and the braid 5d, 4and the tapered surface 68 serves an important function in fixing the center contact against axial movement as will hereinafter be described in detail.

A crimp ring 7i) of larger internal diameter than the outer diameter 4of the head portion ed of sleeve 6d is provided, and is slipped over the cable d before engagement of the positioning sleeve titi on the cable. Before the crimp ring "iti is employed, the forward end of the coaxial cable, upon which the center contact member 42,

" the insulator bead 57 and the positioning sleeve 60 are mounted, is inserted from the rear into the receptacle Y body or shell le, so that the center contact member d2 is positioned within the insulator bore and the portion of i positioning sleeve o0 forward of lshoulder 66 is'received tubular rearward portion 46 of the center contact memffl within the rearward ferrule portion 22 of the receptacle shell lo. ln this forwardniost position of the internal parts, the bottom wall 5S of insulator bead 57 abuts against the inner wall of the shallow insulator counterbore 32, and the forwardly facing shoulder do on positioning sleeve ed abuts against the rearward edge of the receptacle shell lo. The crimp ring 'le is then moved forwardly so that it circumscribes the rearward ferrule portion 22 of the receptacle shell and the rearward head portion 6d of the positioning sleeve ed, with the forward end of the cable braid Se disposed under the crimp ring 7d, and the ring ylo is then crimped radially inwardly so `as to provide a` permanent mechanical and electrical connection of the cable braid 54 with both the ferrule portion 22 of shell lo and the rearward head portion 64 of positioning sleeve The crimp ring id is of sufficient axial length so that while its forward edge is disposed adjacent to the external flange 2d on the receptacle shell i6, its rearward edge will be in overlapping relationship with the tapered surface 68 of the head portion 6d of positioning sleeve dit). In this manner, when the ring 70 is crimped radially inwardly, the rearward end of ring 7d will exert a substantial Vforce against the tapered surface 63 in a forward axial direction, thus securely locking the positioningsleeve 6@ in its operative position within the rearward ferrule por-V tionZZ of shell lo, and this in turn positively fixes the insulator bead 57 and the center contact member 4t2 in their operative positions as shown in FIG. l.

The presently preferred crimp ring 7d includes three Vaxially spaced annular ribs 72, 7dand 76, the ribs '72V and 7o being at the rearward and forward ends of ring "itl, respectively, and the rib id being in the middle of ring 7d. The remainder of crimp ring itl comprises a relatively thin walled tubular web 78 between ribs i2 and 7d, and a similar web Sil between ribs 74 and '7o. This novel construction of crimp ring 7h has several benefits. For one thing, the iiexibility of web 78 facilitates the constriction of the rearwardmost annular rib '72 radially inwardly in the region of the tapered surface ed of sleeve ed to provide the positive forward positioning of sleeve 6d. Another important benefit of this construction of crimp ring 76 is that the flexibility or formability of webs 78 and Si) permits the webs to bow radially outwardly, thereby permitting a bunching up of the braid 54 in the region of webs 78 and d@ to provide a more secure gripping of the braid 54 against the outer surface of the rearward ferrule portion 22 of shell llo and the outer surface of head de of sleeve 60. Y Y y An elastomer boot S2, which was slipped onto the cable 4S and moved to a rearward position thereon before the assembly of the other parts, is moved forwardly so as to be engaged over the crimped area, the boot having a forward lip which is interlocked forwardly over the external flange 2d on shell 16, and extending rearwardly over the crimp ring 70 and over a portion of the cable jacket 56. The internal configuration of boot 82 is generally complementary to the connector structure which it covers, and the boot affects a moisture barrier and a strain relief at the region where the cable joins with the connector mem-v ber 12.

FlGS. 3-6 show stages in the assembly of the parts of receptacle connector member l2 as described in detail hereinabove. Thus, in FIG. 3 the parts of coaxial cable di; have been trimmed for attachment of the cable to the connector member, and the elastomer boot 82 and crimp ring 7@ have been slipped rearwardly over the cable 48.

In FIG. 4, the positioning sleeve eti has been slidably engaged over the dielectric layer` 52 of cable 48 and under the braided tubular outer conductor 5ft of cable 4S, and the cup-shaped insulator bead 57 is shown axially aligned with the cable 48 and sleeve 60 but spaced forwardly therefrom ready to be moved axially rearwardly into its operative position.

ln FIG; 5, the insulator bead 57 has been operatively positioned on the end of coaxial cable 4S, with the skirt portion 59 of bead 57 annularly disposed about the end of dielectric layer 52 and with the bared forward end of center conductor 50 extending through the opening in bottom wall of bead 57. Also in FIG. 5 the center contact member 42 has been crimped over the exposed end of center conductor 50, and the forward end of coaxial cable 48 bearing center contact member 42, bead S7 and positioning sleeve 60 has been moved forwardly into operative position in the receptacle body or shell 16 and the crimp ring 70 has been slidably engaged over the forward end of the cable braid S4 and so that it surrounds the cylindrical rearward ferrule portion of shell 16 and the rearward head portion 64 of positioning sleeve 60.

Finally, in FG. 6, the crimp has been applied to crimp ring 70 so as to permanently secure the parts of receptacle connector member 12 in their operative positions. The boot 82 has not been moved forwardly in FIG. 6, but is shown in its forward operative position in FIG. 1.

Although the present invention is not limited to the use of any particular materials for the various parts, where the present invention is employed in a very small connector, soft copper has been found satisfactory for the crimp ring 70, half hard brass has been found suitable for the positioning sleeve 60, and Kel-F or similar dielectric material has been found satisfactory for the insulator bead 57.

Referring again to FIG. 1, and now particularly to the plug connector member 14, the plug shell 84 includes a tubular forward insulator mounting portion 86 and a rearward cylinder or ferrule portion 8S which is somewhat smaller in both internal and external diameter than the respective inner and outer diameters of the forward shell portion S6. An external flange 90 is provided in an kintermediate position on the forward portion 86 of shell 84 for axial positioning of an internally threaded coupling nut 92 that is rotatably mounted on the forward portion 86 of shell 84, and a sealing ring 94 is disposed about the forward portion 86 of shell 84 immediately forward of the external ange 9). With this construction the plug and receptacle shells 84 and 16, respectively, are mated by engagement of the forward portion 86 of -plug shell 84 lwithin the forward skirt portion 20 of receptacle shell 16,

the shells 84 and 16 being drawn and held together by engagement of the internal threads of coupling nut 92 with the external threads of the forward skirt portion 20 of receptacle shell 16.

An external flange 96 is provided on the plug shell 84 at'the junction between the forward portion 86 and the rearward ferrule portion 88 of shell 84, and a forwardly facing internal shoulder 9S is provided in the plug shell 84 at this same region. The rearward ferrule portion 88, the external flange 96 and the internal shoulder 98 of plug shell S4 have the same construction as the corresponding parts of the receptacle shell 16, namely, the rearward ferrule 22, the external flange 24 and the forwardly facing internal shoulder 26.

The plug insulator 100 is a generally cylindrical member which ts snugly within the forward insulator mount- Y ing portion 86 of plug shell 84 and is commensurate in length, the rearward end of insulator 100 abutting against the forwardly facing internal shoulder 98 of shell 84. Insulator 100 has a bore 102 extending axially therethrough, with a forward counterbore 104 provided therein, and a shallow rearward counterbore 106 also provided therein.

The plug insulator 100 is permanently secured within i the plug shell in the same manner that the receptacle insulator is secured in the receptacle shell, by providing an annular groove 108 in the outer periphery of plug insulator 160 and a registering opening 110 through the plug shell 84 so that a bonding and sealing material can be injected into the groove 108.

The plug center contact member 112 is a socket contact member, having a forward socket contacting portion 114 and a tubular rearward portion 116 adapted to be crimped or soldered about an exposed end of the center conductor 118 of a coaxial cable 120.

The coaxial cable 120 has the same construction as coaxial cable 48, and is prepared for attachment to the plug connector member 14 in the same manner that cable 48 is prepared for connection with the receptacle connector member 12. Thus, the coaxial cable 120 includes the center conductor 118, dielectric layer 122, braided tubular outer conductor 124 and an insulation cable jacket 126.

The novel structure of the present invention for attaching the cable to the plug connector member 14 and for positively axially positioning the plug center contact member 112 is the same as the structure employed for this purpose in the receptacle connector member 12. Accordingly, cup-shaped insulator bead 128 is fitted over the bared end of dielectric layer 122, with the bared end of center conductor 118 projecting forwardly therethrough, and positioning sleeve 130 is engaged over dielectric 122 and has a rearward counterbore 132 which receives the skirt portion of bead 128. The positioning sleeve 130, like sleeve 60', has a rearward head portion 134 defining a forwardly facing shoulder 136 and a rearward tapered surface 138. Crimp ring 140, like crimp ring 70, includes annular ribs 142, 144 and 146, with web portion 148 between ribs 142 and 144 and web portion 150 between ribs 144 and 146. When the crimp ring 140 is crimped radially inwardly in the same manner as the corresponding crimp ring 70 of the receptacle connector member, the cable braid 124 will be secured against the rearward ferrule portion 88 of plug shell 84 and against the rearward head portion 134 of positioning sleeve 130, and the positioning sleeve 130 will be held in its forwardmost position as shown in FIG. 1 with its shoulder 136 abutting against the rearward end of the plug shell, and the positioning sleeve 130 will hold the insulator bead 128 in seated position within the shallow rearward counterbore 106 of insulator 100, the bottom of insulator bead 128 holding the center contact member 112 in its operative position within insulator 100.

The cable 120 is prevented from being pulled rearwardly out of the plug connector member 14 by the aforesaid positive iixing of the center contact within the plug connector member, and by the connection of the center conductor 118 of the cable within the center Contact member 112; and also by the positive crimping of the cable braid 124 by the crimp connection, and by engagement of the cable jacket by an outer boot 152 which is positioned in the same manner as the boot 82 of the receptacle connector member. Rearward withdrawal of the coaxial cable 48 from the receptacle connector member 12 is opposed in the same manner.

FIG. 2 of the drawings illustrates the receptacle and plug connector members 12 and 14, respectively, when they are operatively interconnected, in which position the pin Contact member 42 of the receptacle connector member is mated with the socket contact member 112 of the plug connector member, the forward portion 36 of the receptacle insulator 28 is seated Within the forward counterbore 104 of the plug insulator 100, and the forward portion 86 of the plug shell is engaged within the forward skirt portion 20 of the receptacle shell. In this coupled position of the connector members, electrical connection between the center conductors Si) and 11S of coaxial cables 4S and 120, respectively, is effected through the center contact members 42 and 112, while electrical connection between the braided tubular outer i conductors 54 and 124- is etected through the receptacle and plug shells i6 and tiri, respectively.

While the instant invention has been shown and described herein in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is therefore not to be limited tothe details disclosed herein, but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims.

What I claim is:

l. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center conductor, a

ydielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a flexible tubular outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends, a center contact member supported within said shell and insulated from the shell, said center contact member having a forward contacting portion accessible from the 'front of the shell and having a rearward terminal portion adapted to be attached to a bared end of the center "coaxial cable conductor, a sleeve adapted to be engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and axially slidably inserted into the shell from the rear, means engageable between said sleeve and the center contact member to x the center contact member against rearward movement in the shell, said sleeve having a rearward end portion projecting rearwardly out of the shell, and a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of the shell and about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with a portion of the outer conductor oft the cable disposed between the ring and said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve, said ring being `crimped radially inwardly to compress the outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of l the shell and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward a generally rearwardly and radially outwardly directed tapered surface thereon about which the rearward end of the crimp ring is disposed.

d. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a l tiexible tubular outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends, a center contact member supported within said shell and insulated from the shell, said ycenter contact member 'having a forward contacting portion accessible from the front of the shell and having a rearward terminal portion adapted to bek attached to a bared end of the center coaxial cable conductor, a sleeve adapted to be engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and inserted into the shell from the rear, means engageable between said sleeve and the center contact member to x thecenter contact member against rearward movement in the shell, said sleeve having a rearward end portion projecting rearwardly out of the shell, and a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of the shell and about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with a portion of the outer conductor of the cable disposed between the ring and said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve, said ringbeing crimped radially inwardly to compress the outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward movement with respect' to the shell, said rearward end portion of the sleeve coin- CII `prising an enlarged head having a forwardly facing shoulder in abutting relationship with the rearward end edge of the shell and having a generally rearwardly and radially outwardly directed tapered surface thereon about which the rearward end of the crimpy ring is disposed.

5. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a flexible tubular outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends,V

a center contact member supported within said shell and insulated from the shell, said center contact -member having a forward contacting portion accessible from the front of the shell and having a Vrearward terminal portion adapted to be attached to a bared endrof the center coaxial cable conductor, a sleeve adaptedto be engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and insertedinto the shell from the rear, means engageable between said sleeve and the center contact member to ix the. center contact member against rearward movement in the shell, said sleeve having a rearward end portion projecting rearwardlyout of the shell, and a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of the shell and about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with a portion of the outer conductor of the cable disposed between the ring and said rearward end portions ofthe shell and sleeve, said ring being crimped radially inwardly to compress the outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward movement with respect to the shell, said crimp ring comprising a plurality of annular ribs and at least one annular web portion intermediateV said ribs which is thinner in a radial direction than said ribs, one of said ribs being disposed in encircling relationshiprabout said rearward end portion of the sleeve, and at least one of said ribs-being disposed in encircling relationship about said rearward end portion of the shell. n y

d. An electrical connector member as detined in claim 5 wherein said rearward end portion of the sleeve has a generally rearwardly `and radially outwardly directed tapered surface thereon about whichy said first mentioned one of said ribs is disposed. Y

Y 7. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center' conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a braided outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front end rear ends, an insulation body mounted in the shell and retained against axial movement in the shell, the insulation body having the forward end of the insulation body and a rearward terminal portion adapted to be attached to a bared end r of the center coaxial cable conductor, a sleeve adapted to be slid'abiy engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and axially slidably inserted into said shell from the rear,

ymeans engageable between said sleeve and the center about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with a portion'of the braided outer conductor of the cable disposed between thering and Said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve, said ring being crimped radially l inwardly to compress the braided outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of the shell i and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward movement with respect to the shell.

8. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a braided outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends, an insulation body mounted in the shell and retained against axial movement in the shell, the insulation body having a bore extending axially therethrough, a center contact member mounted in said bore of the insulation body and having a forward contacting portion accessible from the forward end of the insulation body and a rearward terminal portion adapted to be attached to a bared end of the center coaxial cable conductor, a Sleeve adapted to be sldably engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and inserted into said shell from the rear, means engageable between said sleeve and lthe Icenter contact member to tix the center contact member against rearward movement in the shell, said sleeve having a rearward end portion projeeting rearwardly out of the shell, and a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of the shell and about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with a portion of the .braided outer conductor of the cable disposed between the ring and said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve, said ring being crimped radially inwardly to compress the braided outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward movement with respect to the shell, said insulation body having a cylindrical outer surface portion which seats within a cylindrical inner surface portion of the shell in close-fitting, opposed relationship, an annular groove in said outer surface of the insulation body, an opening through the wall of the shell in cornmunication with said annular groove through which bonding material may be introduced into said groove, and bonding material filling said groove so as to provide a bonded, sealed annular connection between the insulation body and the shell.

9. An electrical connector member for attachment to an end of a coaxial cable having a center conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding the center conductor and a braided outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, said connector member comprising a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends, an insulation body mounted and fixedly axially in the shell, the insulation body having a bore extending axially therethrough, a center contact member mounted in said bore of the insulation body and having a forward contacting portion accessible from the forward end of the insulation body and a tubular rearward terminal portion adapted to receive therein and be attached to a bared end of the center coaxial cable conductor, an insulator bead in axially aligned, abutting relationship with the rearward end of said center contact member and extending radially outwardly to a larger radial extent than the dielectric layer of the coaxial cable, said bead having an opening therethrough and being adapted to be disposed between the forward end of the dielectric layer of the cable and the rearward end of the center contact member with the center conductor of the cable extending through said opening in the bead, a sleeve adapted to be slidably engaged over the dielectric layer of the cable and axially slidably inserted into said shell from the rear, said sleeve having a forwardly facing surface thereon which engages said radially outwardly extending portion of the bead to fix the bead and center contact member against rearward movement in the shell, said sleeve having a rearward end portion projecting rearwardly out of the shell, and a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of the shell and about said rearward end portion of the sleeve with the forward end portion of the braided outer conductor of the cable disposed between the ring and Said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve, said ring being crimped radially inwardly to compress the braided outer conductor of the cable against said rearward end portions of the shell and sleeve and to hold the sleeve against rearward movement with respect to the shell. l

10. An electrical connector member as defined in claim 9 wherein said insulator bead is generally cup-shaped, having a radially oriented bottom portion with said opening extending centrally therethrough and having a peripheral skirt portion extending rearwardly from said bottom portion, said bottom portion of the bead being in abutting relationship with the rearward end of the center contact member and the rearward edge of said skirt portion of the bead being in abutting relationship with said forwardly facing surface of the sleeve.

11. An electrical connector member as defined in claim 10 wherein the sleeve has a forward counterbore'therein within which said skirt portion of the bead is received, said forwardly facing surface of the sleeve dening the inner end of said counterbore.

12. An electrical connector comprising a pair of complementary connector members for interconnecting the ends of two coaxial line sections, each of said coaxial line sections comprising a center conductor, a dielectric layer surrounding said center conductor and a braided outer conductor surrounding the dielectric layer, each of said co-nnector members compri-sing a tubular shell of conducting material having front and rear ends, an insulation body mounted in each shell and retained against axial movement in the shell, each insulation body having a bore extending axially therethrough, center contact members mounted in the respective said insulation body bores and having matable forward contacting portions accessible from the forward ends of the respective insulation bodies and rearward terminal portions adapted to be attached to bared ends of the respective center coaxial cable conductors, a sleeve adapted to be slidably engaged over the dielectric layer of each cable and axially slidably inserted into the respective shell from the rear, means engageable between each sleeve and the respective center contact member to fix the center contact member against rearward movement in the respective shell, each of said sleeves having a rearward end portion projecting rearwardly out of the respective shell, a crimp ring engageable in surrounding relationship about a rearward end portion of each shell and about said rearward end portion of the respective sleeve with a portion of the respective braided outer conductor of the respective cable disposed between the ring and said rearward end portions of the respective shell and sleeve, each of said rings being crimped radially inwardly to compress the braided outer conductor of the respective cable against said rearward end portions of the respective shell and sleeve and to hold the respective sleeve against rearward movement with respect to the shell, and means for interconnecting said shells in front end-to-front end relation with said center contacts in mated eng-agement.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,054,981

715,432 12/ 41 Germany.

JOSEPH D. SEERS, Primary Examiner. W. DONALD MILLER, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3431533 *Jan 30, 1967Mar 4, 1969Leon MouttetElectrical connecting device for high tension wire
US3740453 *Dec 27, 1971Jun 19, 1973Rca CorpAdapter for coaxial cable connector
US3792418 *Sep 3, 1971Feb 12, 1974Bunker RamoElectrical connector
US3930705 *Mar 8, 1974Jan 6, 1976Bunker Ramo CorporationElectrical connector assembly
US4009927 *Oct 21, 1975Mar 1, 1977Litton Systems, Inc.Spiral crimp for retaining a wire conductor in a metal contact
US4173384 *Aug 23, 1978Nov 6, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyFlexible co-axial connector for cable in-line electronics
US4173385 *Apr 20, 1978Nov 6, 1979Bunker Ramo CorporationWatertight cable connector
US4336977 *Sep 24, 1980Jun 29, 1982Bunker Ramo CorporationCrimped connector assembly for fiber optic cables
US4596434 *Jan 16, 1985Jun 24, 1986M/A-Com Omni Spectra, Inc.Solderless connectors for semi-rigid coaxial cable
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/585, 174/89
International ClassificationH01R9/05
Cooperative ClassificationH01R9/0518
European ClassificationH01R9/05H