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Publication numberUS3196597 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1965
Filing dateMar 22, 1962
Priority dateMar 22, 1962
Publication numberUS 3196597 A, US 3196597A, US-A-3196597, US3196597 A, US3196597A
InventorsPiper Jack R
Original AssigneeItt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tank-loading and de-aeration of viscous materials
US 3196597 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 27, 1965 J. R. PIPER 3,196,597

TANK-LOADING AND DE-AERATION OF VISCOUS MATERIALS Filed March 22, 19 62 2 Sheets-Sheet l t 2g a July 27, 1965 J. R. PIPER TANK-LOADING AND DE-AERA'I'ION 0F vIscous mmnnns Filed March 22, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent 3,196,597 TANK-LOADING AND DE-AERATION OF VISCOUS MATERIALS Jack R. Piper, Mount Prospect, 11]., assignor, by mesne assignments, to lnternafional Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Maryland Filed Mar. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 181,694 6 Claims. (Cl. 55-194) This invention relates to the loading of relatively viscous flowable material into tanks and the de-aeration of the viscous material in the course of such loading.

In the production of caulking, sealing and like materials from resins or synthetic rubber materials, it is customary to supply the components of the final material as a base material that is relatively viscous and as an accelerator material that may be of rather low viscosity, and these components are fed in predetermined proportions and at a continuous rate to a blending head where the two components of the material are mixed or blended together so that the resulting mixture will set up into a sealant or caulking material having the desired resiliency.

The ultimate characteristics of the blended mixture depend of course upon the nature of the two components and the proportions in which these components are blended, and it is common practice therefore to feed the two components by means of positive displacement metering pumps so as to provide the desired ratio of mixture. In such proportioning of the components of the mixture it is essential that entrapped air be removed from the components, and particularly from the viscous base material, and in commercial blending apparatus provision is made for loading the base material under vacuum conditions so as to remove entrapped air as the base component is loaded into the supply tank. This apparatus as heretofore used introduces the base component into the top of the supply tank while vacuum is applied to the tank, and as to most base materials that are encountered, this system of vacuum loading removes entrapped air from the base material to an extent that is found to be satisfactory. However, certain base materials that are used in producing sealant mixtures have been found to be of such kinematic viscosity that voids or air bubbles often cannot be removed by the vacuum loading systems heretofore used. In view of the foregoing it is the primary object of the present invention to provide an improved system for vacuum loading materials into the supply tanks from which such material is to be subsequently withdrawn during the metering and blending of the components of the mixture, and an object related to the foregoing is to provide apparatus of a simple and eifective character whereby the vacuum loading of viscous materials may be rendered effective With base materials that have an extremely high kinematic viscosity.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims, and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which, by way of illustration, show a preferred embodiment of the present invention and the principles thereof, and what is now considered to be the best mode in which to apply these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 i a vertical sectional view illustrating vacuum loading and de-aeration apparatus embodying features of the invention;

FIG. 1A is a fragmentary view showing the upper' end 3,196,597 Patented July 27, 1965 of the loading tube of the apparatus in a closed relationship.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG, 1 and showing the parts of the apparatus in a ditferent relationship; and

FIG. 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 of FIG. 1.

For purposes of disclosure the invention is herein illustrated as embodied in a blending system wherein an accelerator component is contained in a supply tank 10, a base compound is contained within a supply tank 11, and these components are fed respectively and in predetermined proportion by positive displacement metering pumps MP-l and MP-2 to a rotary blending head 12 where the two components are mixed or blended with each other and the blended product is thereafter discharged from a blender outlet 14.

Under and in accordance with the present invention the loading of base material B in the tank 11 is accomplished in a novel manner such that the base material B is effectually de-aerated and the voids removed even though it is of extremely high kinematic viscosity. This is accomplished in a broad sense by flowing the base material B into the tank 11 while maintaining the tank 11 under vacuum, and then when after the desired quantity of material has been introduced, the vacuum is maintained while downward pressure is mechanically applied to the upper surface of the material B. The combined action of the vacuum and the downward pressure serves to eliminate air bubbles and voids that may have been formed by the material B not flowing together as the material drops into the tank.

In enabling this novel de-aeration and void elimination procedure to be carried out, the present invention provides a de-aeration head assembly H that is mounted on and forms the upper part of the tank 11.

The supply tank 11 is generally cylindrical in form and has a side wall 15. At its lower end the side wall 15 has a cross wall 16, and a side outlet pipe 17 is associated with a baifle structure 18 so that base material may be withdrawn from the tank 11 through the outlet 17 and may pass through a connecting line 19 to the metering pump MP-2. At its upper end, the side wall 15 has an outward annular flange 21 with concentric annular groove 21 in its upper face within which a resilient sealing ring 22 is positioned. The side wall 15 has a plurality of pivoted anchoring bolts 23 thereon, and these anchoring bolts 23 are provided with wing nuts 24 at their upper ends so that the loading and de-aeration head H may be secured in position on the top of tank 11 as well be explained.

The loading and de-aeration head H includes a cylindrical wall 26 of substantially the same diameter as the wall 15 and at the lower end of the wall 26 a flange 27 is secured as by welding at W. The flange 27 has slots 28 formed radially therein to receive the clamping bolts 23, and the wing nuts 24 may thus be used to clamp the flange 27 downwardly on the flange 20 and in a sealed relationship with respect to the sealing ring 22.

At its upper end the wall 26 has an outward flange 29 fixed thereto as by welding by W-I, and the flange 29 has a top plate 30 fixed in position thereon as by a plurality of capscrews 31. The lower face of the top plate 30 is annularly grooved to receive resilient sealing means such as a ring 32 so that when the plate 30 is secured in position by the cap screws 31, the plate 30 is in sealed relationship with respect to flange 29.

The top plate 30 serves as a mounting for a vertically movable follower or piston 35 that is movable axially within the head H for purposes that will be described. The piston 35 is formed from a disc 35D with an upwardly extending skirt 36 fixed as by welding to the outer c edge of the disc 35D. The arrangement is such that a slight space is provided between the skirt 36 and the internal surface of the wall 26. The follower or piston 35 is carried in a separable relation on the lower end of the piston rod 37, and this piston rod 37 extends slidably through a guide bushing 33 that is centrally mounted in fixed position in the top plate 30. Sealing rings 39 are recessed into the central bore of the bushing 33 to offectually seal the piston rod 37 with respect to the bushing 38 and yet allow vertical movement of the piston rod. The upper portion of the piston rod 37 has a transverse handle 40 secured thereon in an adjustable relation as by a set screw 41 so that the handle all may be used in moving the piston 35 upwardly and downwardly as will be described. A friction lock 42 is provided on the piston rod 37 so that the lock may rest on the top of the plate to thereby hold the piston in its upper position 31.

The separable connection between the piston 35 and the rod 37 is provided by a disc 37D secured as by thread ing on the lower end of the rod 37, and this disc has a plurality of edge notches 37N which match an equal number of Z-brackets 35B secured to the piston 35. By rotating the rod 37, the notches 37N may be aligned with the upper inwardly projecting arms of the brackets 353. Thus the rod 37 may be attached to the piston 35 for lifting the same, or may be released therefrom so that the rod 37 may be lifted while leaving the piston 35 in place on top of the base material B, as will be described.

On one side of the wall 26, and near the lower end portions thereof, a relatively long and heavy cylindrical hub 45 is extended through the wall 26 so as to be flush with the inner surface thereof, and this hub 45 is secured into position as by welding at W2. The hub 45 serves as a mounting for a horizontally positioned inlet tube 46 that extends through and is slidable in the central bore 453 of the hub 45. A pressure seal is provided between the hub 4-5 and the inlet pipe 46, and in the present instance this seal is afforded by a resilient sealing ring 47 and a sealing nut 48 threaded into the outer end of the hub 45. 7

At its inner end, the inlet pipe or tube 46 has an end cap 49 that is secured in place thereon as by set screws 49S and when the inlet or pipe 46 is in the position shown in FIG. I, the inner end portion thereof extends for a substantial distance across the interior of the wall 26. The portion of the tube 46 that is then located within the wall 26 has a plurality of spaced openings 59 formed therein near the upper extremity of the pipe of tube 4d. Only one row of openings 45 is shown, but it is to be understood that a similar row of openings is provided in a similar relation in the opposite side of the pipe or tube 45. The openings 50 are relatively small so that the portions of material fed therefrom are of small cross section and thus the effectiveness of the vacuum is enhanced.

The outer or left hand end of the inlet tube 46 has an elbow 52 fixed thereon and a vertical inlet pipe 53 extends upwardly from the elbow 52. The upper end of the vertical inlet pipe 53 is normally closed and sealed by a cap 54 as shown in FIG. 1A of the drawings, this cap 54 being removably held in place by pivoted securing bolts 55 and wing nuts 55W. When the tank 11 is to be loaded, the cap 54 is removed, and a loading funnel 60 is put in position on the upper end of the vertical loading pipe 53, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In this connection it is noted that the vertical loading pipe 53 has a flange or collar 62 secured thereon at its upper end as by Welding, and in its outer circumferential surface, the flange 62 has an O ring 63 mounted therein. The loading funnel 60 has a cross plate 64 fixed at its lower end and a downward annular flange MP on the plate 69 is arranged to move downwardly into position about the O ring 63 to provide an effective seal between the lower end of the loading funnel 6t and the upper end of the vertical loading pipe 53.

Within the upper end of the vertical loading pipe 55 and sees? within the lower end of the funnel 6%), a pair of plates 65 and 66 are fixed so that when the funnel 6% is in position, the plates 65 and 66 will be in face to face contact. The plates 65 and 66 have segmental openings 67 therein as shown in FIG. 3 so that by rotation of the loading funnel 6f), the upper end of the pipe 53 may be opened and closed with a valve-like action.

For purposes that will appear hereinafter, the inlet tube 46 is adapted to be shifted from the inner position as shown in FIG. 1 to the outer or withdrawn position shown in FIG. 2., and in this movement the tube 46 is slidable within the hub 45 and is maintained in a sealed relationship by the sealing ring 47. Near its outer end the inlet tube 46 has a ring 65% fixed by means such as a set screw 69S, and handles 7% projecting in opposite direction from the ring 69 may be grasped to move the inlet tube 46 either inwardly or outwardly. Means are provided for locking the inlet tube 45 in either its inner or outer position, and as shown in particular in FIGS. 1 and 2, the locking means constitutes a locking plunger 72 mounted in a radial position on the sleeve 73. The sleeve 73 surrounds the hub 45, and is secured to the inlet tube 46 by means of a disc '74 that is welded within the outer end of the sleeve 73 so that the disc 74 supports the sleeve 73 in a fixed relation on the tube 46. The disc 74 has a hub portion in which set screws 74S are mounted, and the set screws 74S serve to secure the disc 74 in position on the inlet tube 46.

The locking plunger '72 is located on the sleeve 73 near the right hand end thereof as viewed in FIG. 1, and this is accomplished by guide bracket 72B through which the plunger 72 extends in a radial direction. The inner end of the plunger 72 extends through the sleeve 73 and may project into a socket formed in the hub 45 near the right hand end thereof. The socket 8% is positioned so that it may be engaged when the sleeve 73 and the tube 46 are in their right hand or inner position as shown in FIG. 1. The bracket 72B provides clearance space within which an expansive coil spring 728 surrounds the plunger, and the spring 728 acts on a washer 72W fixed to the plunger to urge the plunger 72 towards its inner or locking position.' An operating head in the form of a ball 72H is fixed on the outer edge of the plunger to simplify operation thereof. When the inlet tube 46 is to be withdrawn to its outer position, shown in FIG. 2, the plunger 72 may be positioned against the outer end of the hub 45 as shown in FIG. 2 so as to hold the inlet pipe 46 in its outer position. When the inlet tube 46 is withdrawn to the relationship shown in FIG. 2, the end cap '49 or the tube as is located within a counterbored recess 1453 so that the end cap 49 is located entirely outside of the wall 26.

When the tank 11 is to be loaded, the cap 54, FIG. 1A,, is removed from the vertical inlet pipe 53, and the loading funnel dit is put in position thereon as shown in FIG. 1. The horizontal inlet tube 46 is located in its innermost position, asshown in FIG. 1, so that material flowing from the funnel 60 through the pipe 53 and the inlet tube 46 will be discharged in narrow streams in a generally upward and lateral direction through the holes 50, and may drop or flow downwardly toward the bottom of the tank 11. After the funnel 60 is put in place, it is rotated to the position shown in FIG. 2, wherein the openings 67 in the plates 65 and 66 are out of alignment; This in effect seals the upper end of the inlet pipe 53. The material that is to be loaded into the tank 11 is then placed in the funnel 60, and vacuum is applied to the connection 43, FIG. 1, to subject the entire interior of the tank 11 and the associated head H to vacuum conditions. The funnel 50 is then rotated to the position shown in FIG. 1 so that the material may flow downwardly through the aligned openings 67 and on through the pipe 53 and the tube 46 into the tank 11.

As the material being loaded passes outwardly through the opening St) in the inlet pipe 46, the vacuum tends to remove air that may be entrapped in the material. However, where the base component material B is of relatively high kinematic viscosity, some air may be retained in a trapped condition within the material B, or the material may not flow together as the material gathers in the bottom of the tank, thus to form voids or air bubbles A within the material as this material accumulates within the bottom of the tank 11.

Under the present invention, such voids or air bubbles A are removed after the tank 11 has been filled to the desired extent. This is accomplished by withdrawing the inlet tube 46 from the position shown in FIG. 1 to the position shown in FIG. 2, the inlet tube being locked in this withdrawn position by the locking plunger '72 as indicated in FIG. 2. The funnel 60 is at this time rotated to the position shown in FIG. 2, so that the openings 67 are closed, and vacuum is maintained in the upper interior of the tank 11 through the connection 43. Then, while maintaining this vacuum condition within the tank 11, the lock 42 on the piston rod 37 is released and the plunger or piston 35 is moved downwardly into contact with the upper surface of the material B in the tank 11, as shown in FIG. 2. Such downward movement of the piston or follower 35 is made possible because the inlet pipe 46 is at this time located in its withdrawn position of FIG. 2. The plunger 35 is then subjected to substantial downward force that is applied through the handle 40 and the piston rod 37 to apply mechanical pressure to the upper surface of the material B. This mechanical pressure cooperates with the action of the vacuum that is being applied, so the voids A are forced together in the material B.

After the voids have been removed from the material B by the combined action of mechanical force and vacuum, the piston 35 is preferably left in place and the rod 37 and the disc 37D are Withdrawn to the upper position shown in full lines in FIG. 2, and the inlet tube 46 is returned to its innermost position shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. The rod 37 is withdrawn by first rotatively releasing the plate 37D from the brackets 35B, as hereinbefore described. Where the materialB has a high kinematic viscosity, the piston 35 serves to scrape the material from the walls of the tank 11, it being noted that without this scraping action, the material may in some instances cling to the walls 15 to a depth of one inch or more.

It might be pointed out that it is important when the inlet tube 46 is returned to its inner position that it be locked in this position by the plunger 72. This locking is important because during the subsequent feeding of the material B from the tank 11, the tank will be subjected to substantial air pressure applied through the connection 43. After the tube 46 has been returned to its inner position, the loading funnel 60 is removed and the sealing cap 54 is replaced as shown in FIG. 1A, so that the required air pressure may thereafter be applied within the tank 11 for feeding of the material B.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the present invention enables materials of extremely high kinetic viscosity to be loaded within a supply tank, and effectually de-aerated. It will also be apparent that the present invention provides apparatus that is extremely simple in character and which makes it possible to load and de-aerate extremely viscous materials.

Thus while a preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the appending claims.

I claim:

1. A supply container for containing highly viscous flowable material comprising an upright tank having a top wall, a piston movable up and down in the tank and a piston rod extended slidably through said top wall for so moving the piston, means for releasably holding the 6 piston in an upper position near said top wall, a horizontal inlet pipe mounted for limited sliding movement radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position wherein an inner portion of the inlet pipe is located beneath the piston and within the tank and an outer position wherein the inner end of the inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, means for feeding the material into said horizontal pipe and said tank, and means for applying vacuum to the upper portion of the tank communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston.

2. A supply container for containing highly viscous flowable material comprising an upright tank having a top wall, a piston movable up and down in the tank and a piston rod extended slidably through said top wall for so moving the piston, means for releasably holding the piston in an upper position near said top wall, a horizontal inlet pipe mounted for limited sliding movement radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position wherein an inner portion of the inlet pipe is located beneath the piston and within the tank and an outer position wherein the inner end of the inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, said inlet pipe having its inner end closed and having discharge openings in upper surfaces thereof, means for introducing a viscous fiowable material into said horizontal inlet pipe and through said opening into said tank, and means for applying vacuum to the upper portion of the tank communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston.

3. A supply tank for containing viscous material, said tank comprising bottom and side walls, an outlet fitting at the lower end of said tank through which material may be withdrawn from the tank, a de-aerating head secured on the upper end of said side walls and including extension side walls constituting an extension of the side walls of the tank, and a top wall on said extension walls, a piston rod slidable axially in sealed relation through said top wall, a piston on said rod within said extension walls, a horizontal inlet pipe slidable radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position relative to the center of said tank wherein an inner portion of said inlet pipe is located beneath the piston and within the tank and an outer position relative to the center of said tank wherein the inner end of said inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, said inlet pipe having discharge openings in an upper surface thereof, a vertical inlet pipe connected to the outer end of said horizontal pipe with respect to the center of said tank and for passing said viscous material into said horizontal pipe and thence into said tank through said openings, a funnel removably positioned on the upper end of the vertical pipe for receiving said viscous material and passing it into said vertical inlet pipe, cooperating valve means in part on the funnel and in part on the vertical pipe for opening or closing the upper end of the vertical pipe, and means for locking said horizontal pipe in either its innermost or outermost position with respect to the tank and means for supplying vacuum communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston.

4. A supply container for containing highly viscous flowable material comprising an upright tank having a top portion including a top wall, a piston loosely positioned in and movable up and down in the tank and a piston rod slidable through said top wall for so moving the piston, means for releasably holding the piston in an upper position near said top wall, a horizontal inlet pipe slidable radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position wherein an inner portion of the inlet pipe is located beneath the piston and within the tank and an outer position wherein the inner end of the inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, said inlet pipe having relatively small discharge openings formed in said inner portion hereof, means for feeding material into said inlet pipe and through said openings into said tank, and means for supplying vacuum to the upper portion of the amass";

a tank communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston.

5. A supply container for containing a supply of highly viscous fiowable material comprising an upright tank having a top portion including a top wall, a piston positioned in and movable up and down in the tank and a piston rod slidable through said top wall for so moving the piston, means for releasably holding the piston rod in an upper position wherein the piston is located near said top wall, a horizontal inlet pipe slidable radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position wherein an inner portion of the inlet pipe is located beneath said upper position of the piston and within the tank and an outer position wherein the inner end of the inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, said inlet pipe having relatively small discharge openings formed in said inner portion thereof, means for feeding material into said inlet pipe and through said openings into said tank, means for applying vacuum to the upper portion of the tank communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston, means for detachably connecting said piston rod to said piston so that said piston rod may be withdrawn upwardly while leaving the piston resting on the top of the material in the tank, and means for applying air pressure to the upper portion of the tank to force said piston downwardly in the tank.

6. A supply system for highly viscous flowable material comprising an upright tank having a top portion including a top wall, a piston slidable up and down in the tank, a piston rod siidable through said top wall and having a rotatably detachable connection with the piston at the lower end of the rod, means for releasably holding the piston rod in an upper position wherein the piston is supported near said top wall, a horizontal inlet pipe slidable radially through an upper portion of the tank between an inner position wherein an inner portion of the inlet pipe is located within the tank and beneath the upper position of the piston and an outer position wherein the inner end of the inlet pipe is out of the downward path of said piston, said inlet pipe having relatively small discharge openings forrned in said inner portion thereof, means for feeding material into said inlet pipe and through said openings into said tank, means for applying vacuum to the upper portion of the tank communicating with the portion of the tank beneath the piston, said piston rod being adapted to be detached and withdrawn upwardly while leaving the piston restingion the top of the material in the tank, and means for applying air pressure to the upper portion of the tank to force said piston downwardly in the tank with a feeding and side scraping action on the material in the tank.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,244,952 6/41 Kapelman 222-3S8 2,570,835 10/51 Mooney et al. 55189 2,797,767 7/57 Brooke et al. 55'55 X 2,798,573 7/57 Vesterdal et al. 55-55 2,906,367 9/59 Vandenburgh 55-55 2,913,232 11/59 Silverman 261-115 X 2,984,391 5/61 Watters et al. 222-309 3,072,462 1/63 Anderson 222309 X REUBEN FRTEDMAN, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent Not 3,196,597 July 27, 1965 Jack R. Piper It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 6, line 8, after "horizontal" insert inlet same column 6, line 73, for "hereof read thereof Signed and sealed this 15th day of February 1966 (SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWIDEH EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents HARM:5AM m u VIM WW

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2244952 *Aug 8, 1939Jun 10, 1941Felix KapelmanDispensing device
US2570835 *Apr 28, 1949Oct 9, 1951Owens Illinois Glass CoDeaerating and dispensing slurry
US2797767 *Jul 31, 1956Jul 2, 1957Lewis BrookeMethod and apparatus for treating lubricants
US2798573 *May 28, 1953Jul 9, 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoDegasification of non-gaseous fluids
US2906367 *Nov 8, 1956Sep 29, 1959American Viscose CorpDe-gasifying liquids
US2913232 *Aug 29, 1956Nov 17, 1959Cottrell Res IncGas treating device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6117212 *Jul 22, 1997Sep 12, 2000International Business Machines Corp.System for evacuating air from a viscous media
US6652630 *Mar 2, 2000Nov 25, 2003Starlinger & Co. Gesellschaft M.B.H.Device for degassing melts
EP0311593A2 *Sep 21, 1988Apr 12, 1989Peter LisecStorage cylinder for extruding pasty material
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/197, 222/389
International ClassificationB01D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01D19/00
European ClassificationB01D19/00