Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3198943 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1965
Filing dateMay 1, 1961
Priority dateMay 1, 1961
Publication numberUS 3198943 A, US 3198943A, US-A-3198943, US3198943 A, US3198943A
InventorsJohn M Pistey
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Panel type illumination device and connector therefor
US 3198943 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. M. PISTEY Aug. 3, 1965 PANEL TYPE ILLUMINATION DEVICE AND CONNECTOR THEREFOR Filed May 1, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 John/*7 1 /53 665,

J. M. PISTEY Aug. 3, 1965 PANEL TYPE ILLUMINATION DEVICE AND CONNECTOR THEREFOR Filed May 1, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent This invention relates to connectors, being particularly related to connectors for electric discharge lamps commonly known as fluorescent lamps, and the arrangement 1 of connectors in such lamps. The connectors of this invention are readily useable to interengage a pair of lamp bases of the type disclosed and claimed in the copending application of Messrs. Albert F. Pate, Robert A. Kuebler, and Harold R. Kestner, Serial No. 106,827, filed concurrently herewith and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention.

Heretofore, the most commonly used fluorescent lamp has had a straightdine tubular configuration, including a tubular glass envelope, with a lamp base positioned at each end thereof. The lamp bases of such a lamp, which are usually two in number, face outwardly, presenting contacts which face away from each other for engagement with an associated pair of separate lampholders. In addition, such a lamp most commonly has also been supported by these lampholders, which are attached to a suitable supporting fixture. To provide a more compact fluorescent lamp than the straight-line tubular varieties heretofore utilized, an improved fluorescent lamp has now been delevoped, wherein a pair of panel-shaped glass members are attached together to form an over-all glass envelope. The envelope includes channels that are doubled back upon themselves in alternately opposite directions. This more compact lamp assumes a generally flat rectangular and panel-shaped appearance. Such an arrangement of the glass envelope, with electrodes suitably positioned therein, provides a concentration of illumination in a relatively small area.

In the aforementioned lamp of panel-shaped configuration, it has been found desirable to provide an efi icient and low cost connector for congregating external lead wires and connecting them to the contact carrying bases of the lamp. It has been considered additionally desirable to physically locate the aforementioned connector together with a pair of cooperating lamp bases so that a very compact illumination device is thereby achieved.

An important object of the present invention is to provide an improved connector which is especially useable with a panel-shaped lamp.

Another important objective of the present invention is to provide an illumination device wherein the lamp and connector assume a novel complementary relationship and disposition, to achieve an illumination device of compact structure.

Another object of my invention is to provide a connector for a fluorescent lamp, which connector compressibly interengages and is supported by the lamp.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved connector which combines efficiently with opposed bases of a panel-shaped fluorescent lamp to provide an eificient illumination device.

A still further object of my invention is to provide an improved connector for a fluorescent lamp, which connector is simplified in structure and readily manufacturable.

In carrying out one aspect of my invention, there is provided an electrical illumination device including a generally flat panel-shaped fluorescent lamp having a substantially rectangular peripheral outline with an elongated peripheral slot formed in one of its sides between two oppositely disposed lamp bases. The lamp bases of the "ice lamp are arranged so that contacts of one base face inwardly toward contacts of the other base. Between these lamp bases, there is positioned a connector that carries contacts at opposite ends thereof which face away from each other. The connector fits compactly between the lamp bases, and the contacts at each end of the connector interengage associated contacts of one of the lamp bases to furnish electric power to the panel lamp from an external source. With such an arrangement of the connector and lamp bases, a compact and efficient illumination device having a rectangular peripheral outline is thereby achieved.

By a further aspect of my invention, I provide an elongated connector which is eificiently cooperable with a pair of spaced apart inwardly facing bases of a fluorescent lamp. This connector may, of course, be combined with the aforesaid structure to provide a particularly desirable illumination. device. The structure of the connector includes a housing with a pair of insulative contact support sections disposed at its opposite ends. One of the contact support sections is telescopically arranged at one end of the housing for reciprocating movement along the longitudinal axis of the housing to facilitate the attachment and removal of the connector to and from the lamp bases. Each of the contact support sections includes a pair of adjacent insulated chambers with a contact supporting means in each chamber. A contact is postioned in each chamber and fastened to the contact supporting means to provide a pair of adjacent insulated contacts facing outwardly from each end of the connector. With such a connector, the contact support section at each end of the connector interengages a base of the bi-pin lamp and the connector contacts mate with the lamp base contacts to energize the lamp from an external source. By means of such a connector arrangement, the connector is disposed between the lamp bases and it is also supported by means of interengagement with the lamp bases to eX- peditiously transmit power to the lamp from a single compact wire congregating unit.

By a still further aspect of my invention, I provide a fluorescent lamp connector having improved contact members which mate with pin contacts of a fluorescent lamp in a novel manner. More particularly, these contacts have a generally S-shaped configuration and are supported in cantilever fashion within insulative contact sections of the connector for resilient movement in the same direction upon engagement with associated contacts of a bi-pin fluorescent lamp, to effect a wiping electrical contact between the mating contacts. This contact structure and arrangement may, of course, be combined with the aforesaid connector structure to provide a particularly desirable illumination device.

Further aspects of my invention will become apparent hereinafter, and the specification concludes with'claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which I regard as my invention. The invention, however, as to organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of -a panel type device embodying my invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the illumination device of FIG. '1, showing a connector embodying my invention disposed between two lamp bases of the device;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the illumination device of FIG. 1;

illumination FIG. 4 is a side elevational view, partially in section' 3 show the interior structure of the connector and lamp bases at the contact ends thereof;

FIG. 5 is a plan view, partially broken away, of the connector interengaged with the contact carrying fragments of the lamp bases;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the connector by itself;

FIG. 7 is a bottom. view of the connector by itself; and

FIG. 8 is an end view of the connector, showing the face of one of the contact support sections.

Referring first to FIG. 1 of the drawings, in which like numbers denote like parts in all figures, there is shown a fluorescent illumination device 1 of simplified and compact construction and arrangement. Device 1 includes lamp 3 which is substantially panel-shaped, fixture 5 which supports the lamp, and connector 7 which interengages the lamp, as shall be described in detail hereinafter, to supply electrical power thereto from externally extensive lead wires.

The lamp 3 has a generally rectangular and panelshaped appearance, including two relatively flat glass sheets 11 and 13 which are bonded together to form an over-all glass envelope. (See FIGS. 1 and 2.) More specifically, as suggested by the plan view of FIG. 1, upper sheet 11 of lamp 3 includes a plurality of elongated parallel channels 14-19 that face downwardly (viewing FIG. 2) and are in consecutive communication via relatively short connecting channels 20-24. The channels 14-19 are hence, in effect, doubled back upon themselves in alternately opposite directions. Thus, as shown in FIG. 1, channel 14 communicates with channel 15 at connecting channel 20, channel 15 communicates with channel 16 at channel 21, channel 16 communicates with channel 17 at channel 22, channel 17 communicates with channel 18 at channel 23, and channel 18 communicates with channel 19 at channel 24. Each of the elongated channels 14-19 has a cross section which is partially cylindrical. The outer peripheral outline of upper sheet 11 has a rectangular coplanar ledge 25 formed thereupon. Ledge 25 is disposed downwardly or away from the deepest surfaces of the channels 14-24 (FIG. 3) and attached to the rectangular coplanar ledge 26 of bottom sheet 13, by a means not shown. Glass sheet 13 has a grid-shaped aggregation of light diffusing squares 27 formed thereon. When the glass sheets 11 and 13 are attached together, as shown in FIGS. 1-3, they cooperate to present a plurality of communicating internal channels which are grouped together in a small rectangular area, and a congregation of closely grouped light diffusing squares facing outwardly therefrom. Suitable electrodes (not shown) are extended into walls 28 and 29 :of channels 14 and 19 respectively. These electrodes are connected to lamp pin contacts 31 of a pair of lamp bases 33 and 34. The lamp envelope contains a starting gas, such as argon, at a few millimeters pressure, and a small quantity of mercury which is at a pressure of about 2-10 microns during operation of the lamp. A coating (not shown) of fluorescent material is provided on the inner surface of the envelope, and this material is excited to luminescence by the mercury vapor discharge during the energization of the electrodes.

To enable connector 7 to assume a novel and compact complementary relationship with the panel-shaped lamp 3, as shown in FIG. 1, the lamp bases 33 and 34 are securely fastened to the panel-shaped glass envelope of the lamp 3 at the outer ends of one peripheral side 35. Walls 37 and 38 of the bases 33 and 34 are in juxtaposed relationship, respectively, to Walls 28 and 29 of channels 14 and 19. 'Walls 39 and 40 of the bases 33 and 34 are in alignment with the outer edges of under? lying sides of ledges 25' and 26. (See FIGS. 1 and 2.) Bases 33 and 34 are thus disposed adjacent corners 41 and 42 of the glass envelope, and within and upon the rectangularly configured peripheral outline of the lamp 3 at side 35 thereof. Between each of the bases 33 and 34, there is an elongated peripheral slot 43 provided in side 35 of the device 1. Connector 7 fits into slot 43, as shown in FIG. 1, in overlying relationship to ledge 25. The connector is constructed to interengage bases 33 and 34, as shall be described in detail hereinafter, and thereby provide a panel-shaped device of compact rectangular peripheral outline.

Lamp bases 33 and 34 are similar in construction, differing essentiallyin that lamp base 33 is designed for positioning at one end of the lamp side 35, such as for example, the left end when viewing FIGS. 1 and 2, and lamp base 34 is designed for positioning at the other end of the lamp side 35, such as the right end when viewing FIGS. 1 and 2. Certain features of the lamp bases 33 and 34 comprise the invention of Messrs. Albert F. Pate, Robert A. Kuebler, and Harold R.

Kestner and these features are described and claimed in their aforesaid copending application Serial No. 106,827.

Each of the lamp bases 33 and 34 comprises a onepiece molded casing of insulating material that includes a pair of oppositely disposed vertical walls (FIG. 1) connected to a top wall 44. To enable the bases 33 and 34 to substantially conform to the curved configuration of the glass envelope adjacent the lamp bases, top wall 44 is smoothly curved downwardly toward the bottom of the base, as shown in FIG. 2. Tongues 45a and 45b are formed respectively at the back and front of each lamp base. Each of the tongues 45a and 45b has a recess formed therein for engagement with one side of a C-shaped clip 46. The other side of these C- shaped clips engages a recess formed in ledge 26 to thus fasten each of the lamp bases to the lamp envelope.

The front face of each of the lamp bases 33 and 34 is recessed at 33a and 34a (FIG. 5) to form a pair of opposed projecting walls 47a and 47b disposed in planes parallel to the axes of the lamp pin contacts 31. Pin contacts 31 are fastened to a separate insulating member 48 which is slipped into a slot 48a in the lamp base from underneath. The pin contacts project outwardly toward the outer ends of the connector 7 and parallel to the longitudinal axis of connector 7, being frontally disposed within recesses 33a and 34b. Each of the lamp bases 33 and 34 also includes an outstretched arm 49 which engages between a pair of adjacent channels, as shown in FIG. 1, to provide additional support for the lamp base in lamp 3.

To support lamp 3 on fixture 5, four C-shaped fastening strips 5a, such as the one shown in the top of FIG. 3, are attached to the fixture 5. Strips 5a include'arms 5b which engage and support the ledge 27 in a suitable manner, such as from above the lamp, viewing FIG. 2.

Connector 7 is of elongated and slender configuration and has an oblong cross section. To enable the connector 7 to support, insulate, and contain a pair of resilient contacts 51 at each of its ends 53 and 55, two contact support sections 57 have been provided. One of the contact support sections 57 faces outwardly from each end of the connector housing. The contact support sec tions 57 are molded from a suitable insulating material and they are also generally box-shaped in structure. More particularly, each support section 57 has a boxshaped body 59 of oblong cross section (FIG. 8) with a pair of opposed L-shaped sections 61 and 63 depending from bottom wall surface 65, and an outwardly extensive box-shaped mouth 67 which is also of oblong cross section. Mouth 67 communicates with body 59, is coaxial thereto, and is stepped inwardly therefrom at its sides by shoulders 69 and 71.

When bar connector 7 is installed between the two inwardly facing cooperating lamp bases 33 and 34, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, each month 67 of the connector interengages and cooperates with the recessed face of one of the lamp bases. More specifically, when connector 7 is seated between the pair of mating lamp bases 33 and 34, the outer surfaces of oppositely disposed vertical walls 73 and 75 (FIGS. 6 and 7) of connector mouth 67 (at each end of the connector 7) are each disposed in contiguity to associated surfaces of vertical walls 47a and 47b of lamp bases 33 and 34. The outer surface of horizontal bottom wall 77 of connector mouth 67 rests upon and is supported by bottom wall 47c of the associated lamp base. Tongue 45b of each lamp base extends underneath the bottom wall 65 of the contact support section 57 and faces upwardly as shown on the left side of FIG. 4 to furnish an additional supporting means for each end of connector 7.

Turning now to an explanation of the internal structure of contact support sections 57, attention is directed to FIGS. 4 and 8. When mouth 67 of section 57 is viewed from the outer end or frontal face 81 thereof, it will be noted that section 57 includes upper and lower chambers 83 and 85 respectively (FIG. 4). Chambers 83 and 85 are formed by top, intermediate and bottom transverse walls 87, 89, and 65, respectively, which are integrally joined to vertical walls 73 and 75 of mouth 67 and vertical walls 91 and 93 of body 59 (FIGS. 7 and 8). To guide the resilient movement of contact 51 in 97 (FIG. 4) which opens toward the longitudinal center of the connector from the rear face 99 (FIG. 4) of contact support section 57. Between front and rear faces 81 and 99 of each contact support section 57, a pair of spaced transversely extensive projections 101 are formed on the inner surfaces of vertical walls 91 and 93 of body 59. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 8, the projections 101 have their inner vertical surfaces parallel to each other and they are spaced apart by slot 102. Slot 102 communicates with bottom slot 95 in each chamber. The upper horizontal surfaces of each pair of projections 101 are spaced from one or the other of transverse walls 87 and 89 by a transversely and longitudinally extensive upper slot 103. Slots 102 and 103 in each chamber, as shown in FIG. 8, combine to provide a T- shaped over-all slot which is formed byspaced projections 101 and the associated upper wall surface of the chamber. This T-shaped slot connects the front end of each chamber to enlarged cavity 97. The bottom of each slot 102 communicates with slot 95 at the innermost or rearward end thereof.

For electrically engaging pin contacts 31 of lamp bases 33 and 34 with an efficient contact wiping action, by means of my invention, the aforementioned resilient contacts 51 have been provided. Contacts 51 are constructed of a suitable thin conductive material, such as, for example, phosphor bronze metal having a thickness in the order of 0.018 inch. In particular, as shown in cross section by FIG. 4, each of the contacts 51 has a generally S-shaped configuration, comprising a U-shaped supporting portion 105 and a U-shaped contacting portion 107. Supporting portion 105 of each contact 51 is generally wider than contacting portion 167, and to attach the contact to insulating section 57, an upper section 109 of contact portion 105 (viewing FIG. 4) is extended. through slot 133 of one of the chambers. The outer end 111 of contact portion 195 is then lapped around angularly extensive forward faces of projections 101, as shown in FIG. 4. Section 109 and the outer end 111 together form a hook-shaped end. The U-shaped portion 107 of each contact is thus wrapped around the projections 101 and securely held in engagement therewith by lapped outer end 111.

The U-shaped contacting portion 107 of contact 51, which is relatively slender in width when generally compared with support portion 105 thereof, extends for:-

, 6 wardly toward frontal face 81 of insulating section 57 from underneath projections 101 (viewing FIG. 4). In particular, the upper segment or lamp pin contacting portion 113 of contact portion 107 extends outwardly through slot 102 of the chamber, and is sloped slightly downwardly from a horizontal disposition toward the bottom Wall 65 of the connector 7 (viewing FIG. 4). To provide a resilient spring seat for each contact upon engagement therewith by an associated lamp pin contact 31, the free end 115 of contacting portion is doubled back upon segment 113 in the same general direction as, upper segment 113. Free end also extends into the longitudinally extensive bottom slot 95 in each chamber and is disposed contiguous to a stepped shoulder stop 117'formed in slot 95. With such an arrangement of the resilient contacts 51, when the box-shaped mouth 67 at each end of connector 7 interengages the recessed face of one of the lamp bases 33 or 34, as shown in FIG. 4, the pin contacts 31 of the lamp base are initially engaged by the outermost ends of upper segments 113 of the pair of contacts 51 at the curved outer tips of the contacts 51. This initial engagement forces the segments 113 to move downwardly toward the bottom wall '65 of the support 57. After each lamp pin 31 is first engaged by upper segment 113 of contact 51, the upper segment113 thereupon pivots downwardly about its cantilevered supporting attachment against the biasing force of its associated underlying spring seat to effect an efficient and simplified'contact wipe.

To mount the contact support sections 57 of my novel connector 7, I have provided a pair of complementary L-shaped members 119 and 121 which expeditiously cooperate with two contact supportsections 57 to form a material, such as, for example, a metal having a thickness of 0.025 inch. The L-shaped members 119 and 121 each have two longitudinally spaced tongues 123 formed on one longitudinally extensive outer edge 124 and two longitudinally spaced recesses 125 formed on the other longitudinally extensive outer edge 126. The members 119 and 121 are fastened together by rivet 127 and spring support-129, with the tongues 123 and recesses 125 of contiguous mating edges 124 and 126 in cooperation (as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7), to provide a hollow casing 131 of oblong cross section.

For supporting one of the contact support sections 57 at each open end of casing 131, two pairs of slots 133 and 135, respectively, are formed in the vertically extensive .walls of the casing 131 (viewing FIG. 6) adjacent outer .ends thereof.

More specifically stated, near end 53 of the connector 7, an oppositely disposed pair of rectangular slots 133 are formed in mid-vertical position on the side walls of L-shaped members 119 and 121. Near end 55 .of the connector 7 (an oppositely disposed pair of elongated rectangular slots .135 are formed in mid-vertical position onthe side Walls of the members 119 and 121.

The slots 135 have their axes of elongation disposed generall parallel to the longitudinal axis of connector 7. Each of the contact supporting sections 57 has an oppositely disposed pair of cars 137 projecting outwardly from the box-shaped body 59 of each contact support section 57 fit telescopically into one of the open ends of casing 131. Ears 137 of the contact support section 57 positioned on end 53 of the connector (i.e., the left side of connector when viewing FIG. 4, fit into opposed slots 133 of the casing 131 to rigidly secure one of the insulating sections 57 thereto.

and 121 together.

Turning now to a further aspect of my invention, which concerns itself with a novel and efficient arrangement for for biasing the connector contacts into intereng-agement with the lamp pin contacts, conveniently attaching bar connector 7 to lamp bases 33 and 34, and also facilitating the expeditious removal of the connector 7 from interengagement with these lamp bases, attention is directed to the right side of FIGS. 4, 6, and 7. The contact support section 57 which is positioned on the end 55 of the connector (i.e., the right side of the connector when viewing FIG. 4, 6, and 7) has its'ears 137 fitted into elongated slots 135. Instead of being rigidly supported in casing 131, as is the insulating section 57 at connector end 53, the insulating section 57 at end 55 is telescopically positioned in the open end of casing 131 for reciprocating movement along the longitudinal axis of the connector 7. The rear edge of each of the vertical walls 91 and 93 of body 59 (for each insulating section 57) has a segmentshaped boss 139 projecting therefrom (FIG. 4). The segment-shaped bosses 139 fit into and seat one end of compression spring 141. The other end of compression spring 141 surrounds and is seated by an annularprojection 143 which faces outwardly from spring support 129. Spring support 129 extends transversely to the longitudinal axis of connector casing 131, as shown in FIG. 4, and protrudes through narrow slots 145, such as the one shown in FIG. 6, to help attach L-shaped members 119 Spring 141 runs in compression between support 129 and the rear edges of insulating walls 91 and 93, to normally bias the reciprocating contact support 57 forwardly or away from the longitudinal center of the connector. Ears 137 of the reciprocating sup port 57 are normally biased outwardly against the forward vertical edges of slots 135. When the reciprocating support 57 is compressed, the innermost vertical edges of the slots 135 limit the depressive movement of the reciprocating support 57 into casing 131.

It will thus be seen that the contact support sections 57 are structurally alike in every respect. The section 57 which is positioned at connector end 53 dilfers from the section 57 which is positioned at connector end 55 only in that the first mentioned connector has a C-shaped grounding contact 147 fastened within and between the depending L-shaped sections 61 and 63. The contact 147 shall be further described hereinafter. By utilizing the same insulating sections 57 at each end of my illustrated bar connector 7, an over-all connector unit of economical construction is thereby achieved.

For connecting the various lead wires 149 from an external power source to the resilient contacts 51 at each end of the bar connector 7, the insulated wires 149 are brought into casing 131 from month 151 at the longitudinal center of the casing. Month 151 comprises two cooperating recesses formed in upper longitudinal edges 124 and 126 of members 119 and 121. These recesses have their edges lapped over to form a smooth over-all rim and thereby preclude any possible damage to the insulation of the inwardly extending conductors. It will thus be seen that the entry of conductors 149 to the connector 7 is segregated at month 151. The bared ends of the various conductors 149 are suitably fastened to the U- shaped supporting portions 105 of the resilient connector contacts, such as by soldering them thereto in the manner shown in FIG. 4.

After the conductors 149 have been fastened to the. contacts at each end of my bar connector 7, one of the scopic mounting of the insulating contact section 57 at one end 55 of the connector, the installed connector is also enabled to efficiently withstand various abnormal abuses of the type generally associated with applications of lighting components, such as, for example, severe vibrations. To remove bar connector 7 from interengagement with lamp bases 33 and 34, as suggested in FIG. 4, the casing 131 may be conveniently grasped with the fingers and moved to the right. End 55 of casing 131 thereupon telescopes to the right relative to the spring loaded insulating section 57, and the rigidly supported insulating section 57 at the other end of connector 7 may be readily tilted downwardly (viewing FIG. 2) and removed from its associated lamp base.

' The grounding contact 147 has a C-shaped configuration, and is wrapped around the transversely extensive bottoms 153 of sections 61 and 63 (as shown in FIGS 4 and 8). Transverse tabs 155 of contact 147 engage the inner faces of bottoms 153 to attach the contact to the insulating section 57 which is supported in stationary fashion on the connector. With contact 147 positioned on the bottom of the stationary insulating section 57 in such a manner, the slender contact segment 157 of contact 147 is free to pivot resiliently about a cantilevered support in a direction upwardly and downwardly (viewing FIG. 6) upon engagement and disengagement, respectively, with a grounding strip (not shown).

It will now therefore be seen that my novel connector provides an efiicient and simplified means for interconnecting two contact carrying sections to a pair of opposed lamp bases. It will be further understood that by means of the present invention, I have also provided a novel combination of fluorescent lamp and a connector, where the lamp and connector assume a complementary relationship to achieve an illumination device of compact structure.

While in accordance with the Patent Statutes, I have described what at present is considered to be the preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from my invention, and I therefore aim in the following claims to cover all such equivalent variations as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. An electric illumination device comprising a generally flat electric lamp, said lamp having a peripheral outline including a plurality of sides, an elongated peripheral slot formed in one of said sides between two oppositely disposed lamp bases, each of said lamp bases including a contact means facing toward the other opposed lamp base, and an elongated lamp connector for energizing said lamp, said connector being disposed within said peripheral slot and interengageable with the contacts of said lamp bases thereby to form a lamp and connector combination, said elongated lamp connector having a hollow housing and a plurality of lead wires disposed within the housing. I

2. An electric illumination device comprising an electric lamp, said lamp having a generally rectangular peripheral outline with a substantially continuous illuminaripheral outline, said connector telescoping to permit the attachment and removal of said connector to and from mterengagement with said lamp.

3. An electric illumination device comprising a panelshaped lamp having a generally rectangular peripheral outline, an elongated slot formed in one side of the peripheral outline of the lamp between two oppositely disposed lamp bases, said lamp bases being disposed adjacent the outermost ends of the one side of the lamp outline and carrying contacts therein, the contacts of one lamp base facing toward the contacts of the other base, and an elongated bar-shaped connector disposed within said peripheral slot, said connector carrying contacts at each end thereof which interengage mating contacts of the lamp bases thereby to form a lamp and connector combination with an over-all rectangular peripheral outline.

4. A connector for a lamp, said connector comprising an elongated housingQa pair of insulative contact support sections mounted in opposite ends of the housing,

a pair of oppositely disposed elongated slots formed in opposite sides of the housing near one end, one of said contact support sections having opposed ears slidably cooperating with said slots to allow a reciprocating movement of said one contact support section along the longitudinal axis of the elongated housing, the other contact support section being supported in stationary fashion at the other end of the housing, each of said support sections including at least one insulated chamber, and a longitudinally extensive contact supported in each of said chambers thereby to provide a contact at each end of the connector for interengagement with associated contacts of the lamp, said one contact support section being reciprocably movable to facilitate the attachment and removal of said connector to and from interengagement with said lamp.

5. A connector for a bi-pin fluorescent lamp, said connector comprising a bar-shaped housing an elongated casing of rectangular cross sectional configuration with a pair of insulative contact support sections disposed at opposite ends of the casing, said casing comprising two elongated L-shaped members fastened together in complementary relationship to form a casing of rectangular cross section, a pair of oppositely disposed rectangular slots formed in vertical walls of said casing near one end thereof, a pair of oppositely disposed elongated slots formed in vertical walls of said casing near the other end of the casing, one of said contact support sections being telescopically arranged for reciprocating movement within the casing along the longitudinal axis of the housing, said one contact support section having opposed ears which cooperate with and are guided for reciprocating movement within the elongated slots of the casing, the other contact support section being supported in stationary fashion at the other end of the casing, said last mentioned contact support section having opposed ears formed on vertical walls thereof which cooperate with the said rectangular slots thereby to secure said support section to the casing, each of said support sections including a pair of adjacent insulated chambers, transversely extensive contact supporting means formed in each of said chambers, and a contact fastened to an associated contact supporting means in each of said chambers and substantially disposed within an associated one of said chambers, thereby to provide a pair of adjacent insulated contacts at each end of the connector for interengagement with associated contacts of a bi-pin fluorescent lamp, the telescopically arranged contact support section being reciprocably movable to facilitate the attachment and removal of said connector to and from interengagement with said lamp.

6. An electric illumination device comprising an electric lamp having two opposed lamp bases spaced apart and facing toward each other, each of said bases having at least one lamp contact, a separate contact supporting member removably engaged with each of said two opposed lamp bases, a hollow housing extending between said separate contact supporting members, said contact members extending outwardly of said housing, said housing secured to one of said contact supporting members for unitary movement with said member and said housing extending over said other contact supporting member and telescoped over said other contact supporting member when said other contact supporting member is abutted against one of said lamp bases to shorten the combined length of said other contact supporting member and said hollow housing, said housing carrying said one contact supporting member with it, and resilient means biasing said housing from telescoping relationship with said other contact supporting member to extend said combined length after said one contact supporting member has been aligned with said other lamp base, said resilient means securing said contact supporting members against their respective lamp bases by biasing said housing and said one contact supporting member away from said other contact supporting member.

7. An electric illumination device comprising an electric lamp having two opposed lamp bases spaced apart and facing toward each other, each of said bases having at least one lamp contact, a separate contact supporting member removably engaged with each of said two opposed lamp bases, a housing extending between said separate contact supporting members and connecting them together, at least one of said contact supporting members extending outwardly beyond said housing, said housing telescoped with said one contact supporting member when either of said contact supporting members is engaged against one of said lamp bases to shorten the combined length of said contact supporting member and said housing, and resilient means biasing said housing from said one contact supporting member to extend the combined length of said one contact supporting member and said housing after said contact supporting members have been aligned with their respective lamp bases and said resilient means securing said contact supporting members against their respective lamp bases by biasing said housing and said other contact supporting member away from said one contact supporting member.

8. A connector for a bi-pin fluorescent lamp, said connector comprising a hollow housing, a pair of insulative contact support sections mounted in opposite ends of said housing, at least one of said contact supporting sections being reciprocable mounted, each of the contact support sections including a pair of juxtaposed chambers opening outwardly from one end of the connector, transversely projecting wall means formed in each of said chambers, and a resilient contact disposed within each of said chambers, each of said contacts having a hook-shaped end secured over an associated transversely projecting wall means, a lamp pin contacting portion, an intermediate portion joining said hook-shaped end and said contacting portion, and a biasing portion at the end of said contact remote from said hook-shaped end, said biasing portion engaged against another wall of said chamber and said intermediate portion extending along a face of said transversely projecting wall facing toward said other wall and being wrapped around said transversely projecting wall to said hook-shaped end, said contact being held in said chamber by being wrapped around said transversely projecting wall, hooked over said transversely projecting wall and by resilient engagement between the face of said transversely projecting wall and said other wall, the resilient engagement between the face of said transversely projecting wall and said other wall providing a wiping electrical engagement between said contact of the connector and the associated contacts of the lamp, and the contacts of each contact support section being mounted for resilient movement in the same direction upon interengagement with associated contacts of bi-pin fluorescent lamp.

9. A connector for a fluorescent lamp, said connector comprising a housing, a pair of insulative contact support sections mounted at opposite ends of said housing, each of the contact support sections including a chamber opening outwardly from one end of the connector, transversely projecting wall means formed in each of said chambers,

1 1 and a resilient contact disposed within each of .said chambers, said contact having a hook-shaped end secured over an associated transversely projecting Wall means, a lamp pin contacting portion, an intermediate portion joining said hook-shaped end and said contacting portion, and a biasing portion at the end of said contact remote from said hook-shaped end, said biasing portion engaged against another wall of said chamber and said intermediate portion extending along a face of said transversely projecting wall facing toward said other wall and being wrapped around said transversely projecting wall to said hookshaped end, said contact being held in said chamber by being wrapped around said transversely projecting Wall, hooked over said transversely projecting Wall and by resilient engagement between the face of said transversely projecting Wall and said other wall, the resilient engagement between the face of said transversely projecting wall and said other wall providing a wiping electrical contact between said contact, of the connector, and the associated contacts of the lamp.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,940,368 12/33 Page 339--55 X 1,951,502 3/34 Cadieux 339-50 X 2,238,589 4/41 Hensler 3394-55 2,296,326 9/42 Barclay 339,52 2,303,630 12/42 Goddard 339-55 2,357,057 8/44 Owen 24051.12 2,392,785 1/46 Thomas 24051.12 2,401,555 6/46 De Reamer 33952 X 2,560,877 7/51 Kurtzon 33952 Lemmers 339-52 NORTON ANSHER, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE NINAS, 1a., Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1940368 *Mar 17, 1930Dec 19, 1933Ulmont Page CharlesConnecter for neon tubes
US1951502 *Apr 2, 1930Mar 20, 1934Connecticut Telephone & ElecGaseous signal light
US2238589 *Dec 20, 1939Apr 15, 1941Hensler Frederick JNeon tube connector
US2296326 *Jun 7, 1940Sep 22, 1942Barclay Robert ESocket for high voltage gaseous discharge tubes
US2303630 *Mar 22, 1941Dec 1, 1942Jefferson Electric CoElectrical fixture
US2357057 *Jun 15, 1943Aug 29, 1944Electrical Products CorpLighting fixture
US2392785 *Mar 28, 1945Jan 8, 1946Sylvania Electric ProdLamp base
US2401555 *Nov 7, 1944Jun 4, 1946Gen ElectricLighting system for tubular lamps and holder for use therein
US2560877 *Jan 3, 1947Jul 17, 1951Garden City Plating & Mfg CoTelescoping socket for fluorescent light tubes
US2716739 *Sep 15, 1953Aug 30, 1955Gen ElectricLamp base and holders for double ended electric-discharge lamps
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5463274 *Aug 12, 1994Oct 31, 1995Winsor CorporationPlanar fluorescent lamp having a serpentine chamber and sidewall electrodes
US5479069 *Feb 18, 1994Dec 26, 1995Winsor CorporationPlanar fluorescent lamp with metal body and serpentine channel
US5509841 *Apr 4, 1995Apr 23, 1996Winsor CorporationStamped metal flourescent lamp and method for making
US5536999 *Dec 2, 1994Jul 16, 1996Winsor CorporationPlanar fluorescent lamp with extended discharge channel
US5818164 *Nov 4, 1997Oct 6, 1998Winsor CorporationFluorescent lamp with electrode housing
US5850122 *Jun 26, 1997Dec 15, 1998Winsor CorporationFluorescent lamp with external electrode housing and method for making
US5903096 *Sep 30, 1997May 11, 1999Winsor CorporationPhotoluminescent lamp with angled pins on internal channel walls
US5914560 *Sep 30, 1997Jun 22, 1999Winsor CorporationWide illumination range photoluminescent lamp
US6075320 *Feb 2, 1998Jun 13, 2000Winsor CorporationWide illumination range fluorescent lamp
US6091192 *Feb 2, 1998Jul 18, 2000Winsor CorporationStress-relieved electroluminescent panel
US6100635 *Feb 2, 1998Aug 8, 2000Winsor CorporationSmall, high efficiency planar fluorescent lamp
US6114809 *Feb 2, 1998Sep 5, 2000Winsor CorporationPlanar fluorescent lamp with starter and heater circuit
US6127780 *Feb 2, 1998Oct 3, 2000Winsor CorporationWide illumination range photoluminescent lamp
US6762556Feb 27, 2001Jul 13, 2004Winsor CorporationOpen chamber photoluminescent lamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/220, D26/76, 313/610, 313/318.12, 439/226, 313/318.1
International ClassificationH01R33/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01R33/08, F21S8/02, F21Y2103/025, F21S8/04
European ClassificationF21S8/04, F21S8/02, H01R33/08