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Publication numberUS3199073 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1965
Filing dateApr 30, 1962
Priority dateApr 30, 1962
Publication numberUS 3199073 A, US 3199073A, US-A-3199073, US3199073 A, US3199073A
InventorsHilliker Arthur E
Original AssigneeCrouse Hinds Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vehicular and pedestrian traffic control system
US 3199073 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3, 1965 A. E. HILLIKER 3,199,073

VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM Filed April 30, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 CROSS FIG] 20? STREET El 212 a as as l I i\/\ l I I l I I 2m I 9 I TI-;\ I I A MAIN l2 2|! I I i STREETA I L I l 1 I I M I I I I//\7\PED. K\' PATHS VEHICULAR w CONTROLLER 212 2I6 {fig PEDS DET PEDESTRIAN 206 CONTROLLER 3 205 N '0 Q 2 Z Z Z 0 e 2 2 E (D (I) (I) (D FIGA 2 2 l I z D- Z D- Z O. z D. FUNCTION CAM NAME N0 &' I E E E. I E I (D U) (D U) (I) (I) (O (D STOP TIMING 232 4 PED. WALK 23l SIGNAL 00m WALK --2so FLASH FEED- 229 CONTROL ALL RED- 22s HOLD- 227 INITIAL lNDEX-226 MEMORY- 225 SPECIALINDEX- 224 DONT WALK- 223 WALK 222 mosxms gggg -;g

INVENTORI ARTHUR E. HILLIKERI BY 19 fit-yr! HIS ATTORNEY.

8- 3, 1965 A. E. HlLLlKER 3,199,073

VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM Filed April 30, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 298 FIG. 5

vsmuufi 2m 0m VEH'CULAR as j 80 VEHICLE CONTROLLER DETECTOR r35 FROM 0 PEDESTRIAN X 35o CONTROLLER L T0 PEDESTRIAN s 33 co TROLLER PEDESTRIAN 1 CONTROLLER PEDESTRIAN CONTROLLER TO PEDES TRIAN CONTROLLER FROM PEDESTRIAN CONTROLLER\ O/FQ l I g o l l 5a 0 o y 9! PEDESTRIAN 56 TO conmousn PEDESTRIAN 3B conmouerl I 4/ 4'0 9 TO PEDESTRlAN (L --FROMPEDESTR|AN CONTROLLER CONTROLLER +12v g 2 INVENTOR:

ARTHUR E. HILLIKER BYKP-MW HIS ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,199,073 VEEHCULAR AND PEDES'HHAN TRAFFEL CUNTRUL SYSTEM Arthur E. Hilliher, Pulaski, Nil I, assignor to Crouse- Hinds Qornpany, Syracuse, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 39, 1962, Ser. No. 1%,169 2 Claims. (Cl. 34ll-36) This invention relates to and has as a general object a new and improved traffic control system.

More particul rly this invention relates to the control of both vehicular and pedestrian movements th ough an intersection wherein all vehicular movements will receive a red, or stop indication during the pedestrian right-ofway signal display. The term right-of-way signal display is understood to include both the proceed and clearance signal dis-Play Pedestrian movements at an intersection will normally conthct with one or more vehicular movements, and accordingly it has been found to be desirable to cause the stop signal to be displayed to all vehicular movements while the pedestrian movements receive the proceed and clearance signal indication. Prior to this time, thi result has been accomplished only by the utilization of a threephase actuated traffic controller which was modified so as to permit two phases to be vehicle actuated, and the third to be pedestrian actuated. This arrangement has been proven to be uneconomical where it is desired to provide the vehicle movements with an all-red signal indication during the pedestrian walk and clearance signal indications. Another method of achieving these results was to utilize a minor movement vehicle controller in conncction with a parent controller. This arrangement, however, has proven to be iner'ficient due to the fact that it was impossible to skip the right-of-Way signal display to a vehicular movement not having an actuation of the detector means associated with the vehicular movement. That is to say, that the right-of-way signal indication would be displayed to all vehicular movements whether or not there was a demand for such right-of-way signal display on the movements.

Applicants Patent 3,078,440, which discloses a trafiic control system wherein an actuated phase timer is used in conjunction with a full actuated two or three-phase parent controller, to give an independently actuatable left turn movement does not lend itself to the solution of the problem herein considered. This is so for the reason that the system or" that patent will not function so a to return the right-of-way signal display from the minor movement to the movement which had received the right-of-way signal display immediately preceding the minor movement right-ofvay signal display interval.

Accordingly, he tratiic control system which is the subject of this invention utilizes a pedestrian controller which is designed to operate in conjunction with a two phase semi-actuated vehicle controller. Such vehicle controllers operate to normally present the proceed signal display to the main street, and will transfer the right-ofway signal display to the cross street only upon actuation of the detector means associated with the vehicular movement on the cross street. Upon completion of the rightof-Way signal display to the cross street, the proceed signal display is returned to the main street where it will rest until the cros street detector means is again actuated. A controller of this type is more completely shown and described in the copending application of W. M. Ietiers, Serial Number 757,778, filed Aug. 28, 1958, now iatent 3,078,441, issued Feb. 19, 1963, to which reference will be made hereinafter for a more complete understanding of the invention of this application.

The traffic control system of this invention briefly de- 3.,199373 Fatented Aug. 3, 1965 scribed comprises a pedestrian controller which operates in conjunction with a semi-vehicle actuated vehicular or main controller of the type described to skip the cross street right-of-way signal display portion of the traffic control cycle in the case where there is no call for cross street right-of-way signal display, in a sequence involving a call for a pedestrian walk signal display. In this instance, both vehicular movements will receive an all-red signal display during both the pedestrian proceed and clearance indications, after which the right-of-way signal display is returned to the main street, skipping the rightof-Way display to the cross street. However, in a sequence involving both a pedestrian actaution and across street vehicular actuation, the system will function to provide an all-red signal display to the vehicular movements, and a pedestrian right-of-way signal display simultaneously, as above described, after which the right-of-way signal display will be presented to the cross street trafi'ic for a predetermined time, and upon completion thereof will be returned to the main street.

Accordingly, and a more specific object of the invention is to provide a traffic control system for controlling the movement of both vehicular and pedestrian traflic through an intersection, which is more economical to manufacture, and efiicient in operation than was possible with trafiic control systems of this general type heretofore.

The invention consists in the novel features and in the combinations and constructions hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In describing this invention reference is had to the accompanying drawings in which like characters designate corresponding parts in all the views.

In the drawings FEGURE 1 is a schematic illustration of an intersection wherein the tratiic control system comprising the subject of the invention is utilized to control the vehicular and pedestrian movements through the intersection.

FIGURE 2 is a circuit diagram of the semi-vehicle actuated vehicular controller comprising a portion of the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIGURE 3 is a circuit diagram of the pedestrian controller comprising the remaining portion of the system of the preferred embodiment of the invention, and FIG- URES 2 and 3 taken together show the complete circuit diagram for the system.

FIGURE 4 is a sequence chart for the pedestrian controller shown in FIGURE 3, showing the pedestrian cam um't contacts that are closed in each position of the cam shaft.

FIGURE 5 is a block function diagram of the control system.

Due to the fact that a pedestrian controller, shown in FIGURE 3, is interconnected with the vehicular controller, shown in FiGURE 2, and because the vehicular controller is substantially the same as disclosed in copending application Serial Number 757,778, now Patent 3,078,441 issued Feb. 19, 1963, certain of the reference numerals applied to the parts in said application will be applied to the like parts shown in FIGURE 2, and new reference numerals will be utilized in connection with FIGURES 1, 3 and 4.

Referring, therefore, to FIGURE 1, the intersection illustrated therein comprises a main street 2&0, and a cross street 261. Each approach to the intersection on the main street and the cross street, is shown with a multiheaded arrow 282, and 203, to indicate the various vehicular trafiic movements of trafiic approaching the intersection on the main street. In like manner, the arrows 2M- and 2195 indicate the cross street trafiic movements. The cross street is provided with detectors 2% and 2tl7 on each approach to the intersection, which detectors may be of any suitable type, and are connected in the manner de- ("3 scribed in the copending application to the vehicular controller, shown in block form, and identified by the reference numeral 268. Pedestrian controller 210 is also shown in block form, and serves to control the pedestrian movements 211, 212, 213 and 214, each of which is indicated by a pair of dashed lines.

As will be understood, any or all of such pedestrian movements may be provided at the intersection as is desired. Each of the pedestrian movements is provided with a pedestrian signal, two of which are indicated by the reference numerals 216 and 217. These pedestrian signals are provided with suitable indications, such as walk and dont walk, or walk and wait, or the like, to control the pedestrian movements. Similarly, each of the pedestrian movements may be provided with a detector means, such as a pole mounted switch, or the like, two of which, indicated by the reference numerals 21S and 219, are schematically shown in FIGURE 1. These switches serve to place a call on the pedestrian controller 219 for a pedestrian right-of-way signal indication.

The vehicular traffic signals have been omitted from FIGURE 1 for purposes of clarity, but comprise the standard red, amber and green signals for display of stop, clearance and proceed indication to the vehicular trafhc. These signals are schematically illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 3, and as will be described in detail hereinafter, the connections to the signals have been changed from the arrangement shown in the above-referred to copending application. Also, the connections between the controllers 2493 and 210, and the various signals and detectors have been omitted from FIGURE 1 for purposes of clarity.

Referring to FIGURE 3, the pedestrian controller employs a cam unit, similar to that used inthe copending application, and comprises 13 sets of contacts 226 and 232, inclusive, which are closed in the sequence indicated in FIGURE 4, as the cam unit is rotated by the cam unit motor 234. The pedestrian controller includes in addition an RC timer, generally indicated by the reference numeral 236, including a capacitor 237 and a plate relay 238; a pair of signal relays, generally indicated by the reference numerals 249 and 246; a heater transformer 250 for heating the cathode of the tube of the RC timer; and control means including a relay 252, relay 258, transformer 2622, relay 264, relay 272, relay 276, and a relay 282, each of the relays being provided with one or more armatures and fixed contacts, all of which will be described in detail hereinafter.

The operation of the control system comprising the invention may be best understood by describing the operation of the components of the system as the pedestrian controller moves through one complete cycle.

Accordingly, let it first be assumed that the vehicular controller, shown in FIGURE 2, is resting in the main street green interval, which is position 1 in the sequence chart shown in FIGURE 12 of the above-referred to copending application. let it now be assumed that an actuation of one of the parallel wired detector means 296 or 207 on the cross street is effected by vehicular movement on the cross street, and that no pedestrian actuation is received by the parallel wired pedestrian detectors 218 and 219. Under these conditions the vehicular controller 208 will function in the normal manner to transfer the right-of-way signal display to cross street 201, as set forth in the copending application. Under this set of assumptions, and as will be seen in FIGURE 4, the cam contacts 232 of the pedestrian controller will be closed, thereby completing the circuit comprising line 91, which is connected to the various timing carns in the parent controller, through the closed cam contacts 232 to line 41, which is grounded, thus permitting the vehicular controller to function in the normal manner. As will also be seen by referring to FIGURE 4, pedestrian controller cam contacts 228 are open, thereby breaking the circuit comprising line 284, which is connected to the hot side 2255 of a power supply having a common, or return side 285,

the line 284 being connected through the cam contacts 228 to line 288, which is in turn connected through the coil of relay 24! to the line 2%, which is connected to the common line 236. It will be apparent, therefore, that when the cam contacts 228 are open, the relays 240 and 246 will be de-energized thus causing the armatures of these relays to be in the position shown in FIGURE 3.

In this position, the main signal circuit for the vehicular trafiic signals 31, 82, 84 and 35, are completed through the armatures and lower fixed contacts of the relays 240 and 2 6, as shown in FIGURE 3. Accordingly, the signal 85, which is the main street green signal will be energized from the vehicular controller through the circuit comprising line 291, which is connected to a hot feed through the closed cam contacts 31 in the main controller, line 292, lower lefthand fixed contact 247 and armature 248 of relay to line 2533, which is connected through the main street green signal 85 to the grounded line 294-, thereby energizing the signal 35. As the vehicular controller cycles, due to the actuation of the cross street detectors, the main street amber, or clearance signal 34 will be energized through a similar circuit, after which the cross street green signal 82 will be energized similarly to the energization of the main street signal 85. It is understood that the cross street red signal is energized simultaneous with the main street green signal, and in like manner, the main street red signal 33 is energized simultaneous with the cross st eet green si nal 82, due to the simultaneous closing of the vehicular controller cam contacts 31 and 36, and 33 and 34, in the respective positions of the vehicular controller cam unit.

Also during this period, the relay 252, which is connected by line 295 to the line 296 is in the de-energized state, thereby completing the stop circuit for the main timer from the line in the main timer, which is connected by line 296 through the lower fixed contact 253 and armature 254 of de-cnergized relay 252 to line 297, which is connected, as indicated, to a hot feed at 298. The completion of the stop circuit from the plate of the main timing tube 51 in the vehicular controller permits the cycling of the vehicular controller cam unit to change the signal display from green in the main street to green on the cross street.

Accordingly, it will be seen that, when there is no pedestrian actuation present, the pedestrian controller does not interfere with the normal operation of the vehicular controller.

Now let it be assumed that a pedestrian actuation has been received by the pedestrian detectors 218, or 219, and that there has been no actuation of either of the cross street detectors 205 and 207, again assuming, or starting with the vehicular controller to be resting in the main street green interval.

Referring to FIGURE 3, the pedestrian detector 218 is indicated in a form of a switch, which, when closed serves to connect the ground point 299 through the closed detector 213, line 300, through the coil of relay 264 and line 301, to the secondary of the transformer 2152, thereby energizing the relay 264. The relay 264 will be maintained in the energized condition through the circuit comprising common line 286, line 302, closed cam contacts 225 (these cam contacts being closed in the first position of the pedestrian controller cam unit, as seen in FIGURE 4), line 303, through armature 2(39 and fixed contact 276 of energized relay 254 to line 271, which is connected through the coil of relay 2'54 and line 301 to the secondary of the transformer 262. The energization of the relay 264 causes the armature 265 thereof to move into engagement with the fixed contact 266, thereby completing the main timer cycle circuit via the line 304, which is connected to the line 62 in the main controller, closed contacts 265 and 266, line 305, line 296, closed contacts 253 and 254 of energized relay 252, line 297 to the hot point 298, thereby cycling the main controller out of the green main interval and into the amber main position.

As the main controller moves into the amber main interval the main controller will supply a hot feed through the closed cam contacts 32 in the main controller to line 306, and this hot feed will be connected by the line 3% to the armature 279 of deenergized relay 276 to the fixed contact 23% thereof, and by line 3 37 to armature 2%7 and fixed contact 268 of energized relay 252, and by lines 295 and 29% to the common line 236, thereby energizing the relay 252. The energization of the relay 252 breaks the main timer stop circuit by opening this circuit at 253 and 254, but the line 298 is now connected by line 303, resistor 310, line 311, resistor 312, line 313, through the coil of relay 253 to the line 100, which is connected to the plate of the main timer tube 51 in the vehicular controller, as previously described. The relay 258, however, is a much more sensitive relay than the plate relay 47 in the vehicular controller, and is energized by a much lower current. Consequently, the resistors 31% and 312, and the coil of the relay 253 will offer sufficient resistance to prevent the energization of the main timer plate relay in the vehicular controller, but will however allow the energization of the relay 25% upon completion of the main street amber interval, as the current will flow through the tube 51 in the vehicular controller, when the bias is removed from the grid 59 thereof upon completion of the amber timing in the manner well known and understood in connection with RC timers.

The energization of the relay 258 completes a circuit comprising the hot line 235, line 31o, armature 259 and fixed contact 260 of energized relay 253, line 317 through the cam contacts 226, which are closed in the first position of the pedestrian controller to line 313, which is connected by lines 319 and 320 through the coil of motor 234 to the ground line 236, thereby indexing the cam unit from position one to position two.

Referring to FIGURE 4, it will be seen that the cam contacts 232 are opened in position two, thereby breaking the main timer circuit previously described, thus suspending the operation of the vehicular controller during the operation of the pedestrian controller. Also in position two the cam contact 231 is closed thus completing a circuit comprising the hot feed at point 321 to line 322, which is connected by line 323 through the closed carn contact 231, to line 324 which is connected, as indicated, through the walk signal for the pedestrian movements to ground, thereby energizing the walk signal and presenting a walk indication to the pedestrian movements. Also in position two, the cam contacts 223 are closed, thereby energizing relays 240 and 246 to the circuit comprising hot feed, or supply line 285, line 284, closed cam contacts 223, lines 233 and 2%, through the coils of relays 246 and 249, respectively, to the grounded line 29%. The energization of the relays 243 and 246 breaks the green and amber signal circuits for the main and cross streets by virtue of the separation of the armatures 242 and 244 from the lower fixed contacts 241 and 243 of the relay 24-3 and armatures 243 and 25%, from the lower fixed contacts 247 and 249 of the relay 246. The energization of the relays 2 :0 and 246 also completes the red signal circuits for the main and cross streets from the hot feed 32}, line 326, and through the upper fixed and righthand armatures 245 and 251 of the relays 2 16 and 246, respectively, to the lines 327 and 328, which are connected, as shown in FIGURE 2, through the red cross and red main signals 80 and 83, respectively, to ground, thus energizing both of these signals and giving an all-red signal indication to all of the ve hicular traffic. It will thus be seen that, when the walk portions of the pedestrian signals 216 and 217 are energized, the trafiic signals for all vehicular movements will present a red indication to the vehicular tratfic. The indexing of the cam unit from position one to position two caused a momentary closure of the charge contacts 6 221, thus completing a conventional charge circuit for the timing capacitor 237 of the RC timer 2%. During position two, this charge on the capacitor 237 is discharged through a circuit comprising line 333, closed cam contacts 222, variable resistor 331, line 332 to line 333, which is connected through a resistor 334-, to the ground line 236. Accordingly, the setting in the variable resistor 331 and the value of the fixed resistor 334 will determine the total walk interval. When the charge on the capacitor 237 has discharged sutliciently to remove the bias from the grid of the tube of the timer 236, the tube will conduct through the circuit comprising hot line 235, coil of relay 233, line 335, through the tube of the timer 23 to the line 336, which is connected to the ground line 236, thus energizing the relay 233 and completing a motor circuit from hot line 235, line 337, armature 239, and fixed contact of relay 238, line 333, which is connected to line 319 and through the coil of the motor 234 to the ground line 2% to energize the cam unit motor 234 and index the cam unit from position two to position three.

Referring again to FIGURE 4, it will be seen that in position three of the cam unit, the cam contacts 224 are closed, thereby completing a circuit from the hot side of the power supply line 235 through line 234, line 339, closed contacts 224-, line 3 5%, armature 274 and fixed contact 275 of relay 272 to line 341, which is connected to the line 342, which in turn is connected through the motor c3 of the cam unit in the main controller to the ground line .1, thus indexing the main controller cam unit as long as the relay 272 is tie-energized.

Referring again to FIGURE 4, it will be seen that in position three of the pedestrian controller cam unit, the Walk timing cam contacts 222 open and the dont walk timing carn contacts 223 close, thereby transferring the discharge path for the charge timing capacitor 237 through the closed cam contacts 223 and variable resistor 343 to the line 333 and fixed resistor 334 to the ground line 2%, thus timing the dont Walk indication interval. As will be obvious, the opening of the walk signal cam contacts 231 and closing of the cam contacts 229 also takes place in position three of the cam unit. The closing of the cam contacts 223 completes a circuit from the hot feed at 344, through a flasher unit 345, line 346, closed cam contacts 229and line 347, which is connected to the dont walk signal to give a flashing dont walk indication to the pedestrian trafl'ic. The flasher unit 345 has been illustrated in block form and may comprise any conventional commercially available fiasher. If it is not desired to provide a flashing dont Walk signal, the hot feed at 344 may be connected directly to the cam contacts 229, thus giving a steady dont walk signal indication.

As above set forth, during the time the pedestrian cam unit is in position three, and while the relay 272 remains de-energized, the cam unit in the main controller is being indexed. Relay 272 will be energized, and the indexing of the cam unit in the main controller will be halted when the main controller has indexed to the point where a hot feed is placed on the line 291 by the main controller, which will occur when the main controller reaches the green main position of the controller cam unit. The hot feed on line 231 completes a circuit con prising line 291, rectifier 348, resistor 349, coil of relay 272 to line 353, which is connected to the ground line 286, thus energizing the relay 272, thereby breaking the indexing circuit for the cam unit in the master controller by the separation of the armature 274 from the contact 275. Accordingly, it will be obvious that during the pedestrian clearance interval, which is position three of the pedestrian cam unit, the main timer cam unit will spin to the green main position, thereby skipping the cross street intervals and signal indication.

Upon completion of the discharge of capacitor 237 through the dont walk timing cam contacts 223, the

tube of the RC timer 236 will again become conductive to complete the motor circuit previously described, to move the cam unit from position three to position four. Referring again to FIGURE 4, in position four of the pedestrian cam unit, the cam contacts 229 open and the cam contacts 23% close. Accordingly, a steady hot feed will now be supplied to the dont walk signal from the hot feed at point 321 and line 322, through the closed cam contacts 239, thereby changing the dont walk signal from a flashing to a steady indication.

Now let it be assumed that both a pedestrian actuation and a cross street vehicle acuation are received. Under this set of assumptions, the cross street signal indication will be included in the cycle following the pedestrian signal indication.

As above described, the closing of the pedestrian cam unit contacts 224 will index the main timer until the timer reaches the main street green interval, which causes the energization of the relay 272, thus breaking the indexing circuit. If, however, an actuation has been received on one of the cross street detectors 2% and2ti7, a circuit is completed from the ground point 352 through the closed cross street detector 2416 or 207, line 353, coil of relay 232 to line 354, which is connected, as indicated, to a hot feed, thus energizing the relay 282. The energization of the relay 232 causes the armature 283 to move into engagement with the upper fixed contact, thereby completing a circuit from the line 355 through an additional set of cam contacts 357 provided in the cam unit of the master controller, which cam contacts are closed only in the green cross initial position of the master controller cam unit, whereby, when the master controller reaches the green cross initial position, which is position three, as shown in the sequence chart of FIGURE 12, of the copending application, a circuit is completed through the closed contacts 57 and line 356 to armature 283, and up per fixed contact of energized relay 282 and line 358 through rectifier 359, resistor 349 and the coil of relay 272 to the grounded line 350, thus energizing the relay 272 and breaking the indexing circuit previously described, for the cam unit of the master controller, thereby stopping the cam unit of the main controller in the cross street portion of the cycle. This in turn supplies a hot feed through the cam contacts 34 in the master controller to the line 360 for a purpose to be hereinafter described.

Accordingly, as the pedestrian timer moves from position three to position four, thereby opening the cam contacts 228 and (lo-energizing the relays 240 and 246, the hot feed on the line 360 is connected through the lefthand lower fixed contact 241 and armature 242 to line 361, which is connected through the green cross signal 82 to the grounded line 294, thus energizing the green cross signal 82. Further, in position four of the pedestrian cam unit, the cam contacts 232 are closed, thus completing the discharge circuit for the green cross signal indication, thereby allowing the main timer to time out the green cross initial interval.

Position four of the pedestrian controller cam unit is a spin-through position in which the dont walk signal contacts 230 are closed. It will also be seen that the dont walk signal cam contacts are closed in position one, which is the rest position for the cam unit, so that the dont walk signal is maintained energized While the cam unit spins through position four and returns to position one, which is the rest position.

Notice from FIGURE 4 that the memory cam contacts 225 close in position three, which is the pedestrian clearance position, and are maintained closed in this position, as well as in positions four and one of the cam unit. The closing of the memory contacts 225 will complete a circuit from the common line 286 through line 302, closed cam contact 225 and line 393, to the armature 269 of the relay 264. Accordingly, any pedestrian actuation received Will be remembered at all times, except during the pedestrian proceed portion of the cycle, which is position two of the cam unit, by virtue of the fact that the relay 254 will be held energized by the ground feed placed on the armature 269 upon an actuation of the pedestrian detector 218, or 219, thereby recalling the master controller to the ambersignal indication for the main street in order to permit the pedestrian controller to indicate the walk signal to the pedestrian tratlic, thereby answering the calls received by the pedestrian controller.

The relay 276 is provided as a safety feature, and will be energized at all times that the main timer motor is running by virtue of the hot feed on line 342, through the coil of relay 276 to return line 286. The energization of the relay 276 will connect the ground on line 286 through the armature 277, and fixed contact 278 of the energized relay 276 to the memory circuit line 362, which is connected, as shown in FIGURE 2, in the main timer to the detector relay coil 64 to hold this relay energized, should the vehicle detector be actuated, for remembering any cross street detector actuation that appears during the time when the motor of the main timer cam unit is. energized. This circuit is necessary to insure that a cross street vehicle actuation will be remembered, if the pedestrian unit is causing the cross street portion of the cycle to be skipped, and a cross street detector actuation appears during that time.

What I claim is:

1. A traffic control system for an intersection comprising a main street and a cross street, and having at least one pedestrian movement through said intersection, said system comprising a vehicular controller having at least one actuated movement, signal means for the main and cross street traffic movements connected to said vehicular controller, detector means associated with at least the cross street trafilc movement connected to said vehicular controller, a cam unit in said vehicular controller for rotation through a plurality of discrete positions for presenting the right-ot-way signal display to the signal means associated with the main and cross street trafiic movement, timing means for timing the duration of the right-of-way signal display intervals to the vehicle movements, said vehicular controller normally presenting the right-of-way signal display to the main street tratfic movement and having timing, stop, cycle, and motor circuits, a pedestrian controller means connecting said vehicular controller timing, stop, cycle, and motor circuits through I said pedestrian controller, the timing and stop circuits of said vehicular controller being normally completed through said pedestrian controller whereby said vehicle controller is cycled only in response to vehicle actuations when no pedestrian detector actuations are received, said pedestrian controller having a cam unit rotatable through a plurality of discrete positions for presenting a right-oi-way signal display to the pedestrian movement, pedestrian signal means and pedestrian detector means connected to said pedestrian controller, means operable upon actuation of said pedestrian detector means to open the vehicular controller timing circuit, and to complete said vehicular cycle circuit to cycle said vehicular controller into its main street clearance position, means connecting said pedestrian controller to said vehicle controller operable upon completion of the main street clearance interval to cycle the pedestrian controller cam unit to present the walk signal to the pedestrian movement, and to open said trafiic signal circuits to change all the vehicle signal means to stop, timing means in said pedestrian controller to time the duration of the pedestrian walk signal interval, and operable upon completion of said interval to cycle said pedestrian controller to present a clearance signal indication to said pedestrian movement while maintaining the stop indication to said vehicle movements, skip means in said vehicle controller operable in the absence of a vehicle actuation of said cross street detector means and upon completion of the pedestrian clearance signal indication to complete said motor circuit to cycle said vehicular controller cam unit to skip the right-of-Way signal display to said cross street and return said vehicular controller cam unit to a rest position in which the proceed signal is disgilayed to the main street and means in said pedestrian controller to change the pedestrian signal indication from clearance to stop.

2. The trafiic control system of claim 1, wherein said pedestrian controller is provided with means operable upon actuation of said cross street vehicle detector means to open said motor circuit to halt the cycling of said vehicular controller carn unit in a position in which the cross street proceed signal means is displayed, upon completion of the clearance signal indication to the pedestrian movement, and to present the right-oi-Way signal display to the cross street vehicle movement in the normal manner.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,883,645 4/59 Vivier 340-36 3,056,946 10/ 62 Brockett 340-36 NEIL C. READ, Primary Examiner.

THGMAS l3. HABECKER, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2883645 *Dec 2, 1957Apr 21, 1959Eastern Ind IncTraffic actuated control system and apparatus
US3056946 *Feb 12, 1958Oct 2, 1962Lab For Electronics IncTraffic actuated control system and apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5406276 *Jul 9, 1992Apr 11, 1995Ogle; Terry B.Cross-walk warning light system
US5559509 *Jan 9, 1995Sep 24, 1996Ogle; Terry B.Cross-walk warning light system
US5734339 *Sep 20, 1996Mar 31, 1998Ogle; Terry B.For giving visual indication to motor traffic on a selected road
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/916, 340/309.4, 340/925
International ClassificationG08G1/07, G08G1/08
Cooperative ClassificationG08G1/08
European ClassificationG08G1/08