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Publication numberUS3199287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1965
Filing dateMay 9, 1962
Priority dateMay 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3199287 A, US 3199287A, US-A-3199287, US3199287 A, US3199287A
InventorsKinley John C
Original AssigneeKinley John C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Explosive means for tubing perforator and the like
US 3199287 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. C. KINLEY Aug. 10, 1965 EXPLOSIVE MEANS FOR TUBING PERFORATOR AND THE LIKE Filed May 9. 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet l Jab/7 C. KHz/6y INVENTOR.

ATTO/F/VE) J- C. KIN LEY Aug. 10, 1965 EXPLOSIVE MEANS FOR TUBING PERFORATOR AND THE LIKE Filed May 9. 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTOR/Vf) s- 1965 J. c. KINLEY 3,199,287

EXPLOSIVE MEANS FOR TUBING PERFORATOR AND THE LIKE ATTO/P/VEV United States Patent 3,199,287 EXELGSW'E lvl BANS FOR TUBING PERFORATUR AND THE LIKE .ioltn C. Kiniey, 5815 Royalton St, Houston 36, Tex. Filed May 9, 1962, Ser. No. 195,444 '1 Claims. (Cl. 6t)26.1)

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in explosive means for tubing perforators and the like.

In United States Patent No. 2,544,601, a tubing perforator of the general type of this invention is disclosed. Such perforator provides means for inserting an orifice insert into a tubing or pipe by explosive action.

An object of this invention is to provide a new and improved perforator tool, and particularly a new and improved explosive means therewith, which has all of the advantages of the tool of said Patent No. 2,544,601 as well as certain additional advantages.

An important object of this invention is to provide a new and improved explosive means which is especially suitable for use in a tool for inserting an orifice insert in a tubing or pipe but which is also suitable for use in other explosive-actuated tools and devices.

Anot er object of this invention is to provide a new and improved explosive means wherein a dish-shaped scaling disk is provided for sealing off one end of the explosive chamber to thereby prevent oil-center travel or" said disk whereby sealing of the explosive by the disk is assured.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved cxpiosive means wherein a dish-shaped sealing disk is provided for seating off one end of the explosive chamber to locate the inside upper end of the chamber housing below a flange in the tool body supporting the chamber housing for thereby positioning the explosive within an increased thickness portion of the tool body so that an increased charge of the explosive can be safely used.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a 5,

new and improved perforator tool having a tool body which includes a firing pin body and an explosive chamher body; said firing pin body and said explosive chamber body being interconnected by buttress threads for increased strength, whereby increased explosive powder charges may be employed.

A particular object of this invention is to provide a new and improved explosive cartridge or chamber body having a lower closure plug which is threaded into the chamber body so that when the explosive powder is detonated, such threads are stripped or such cartridge is pulled apart where weakened by such threads to prevent re-use of the cartridge, whereby the dangers of re-use of a fired cartridge are prevented.

The preferred embodiment of this invention will be described hereinafter, together with other features thereof, and additional objects will become evident from such description.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

PEG. 1 is an elevation, partly in section, illustrating the tubing perforator, and the explosive means therewith, after it has been fired for the insertion of an insert orifice into a tubing or well pipe;

FlGS. 2A through 2D are longitudinal views, partly in elevation and partly in section, illustrating a tubing perforator tool from its upper end to its lower end, respectively, and incorporating therewith the explosive means of this invention; and

3,199,287 Patented Aug. 10, 1965 FIG. 3 is an enlarged view similar to FIG. 2B, but illustrating the explosive means of this invention after it has been fired.

In the drawings, the letter A designates generally the tubing pcrforator which includes the explosive means B of this invention, as will be more fully explained. The perforator A is of the type which inserts an orifice insert C into a well pipe or tubing D for the purpose of controlling fluid fiow into the tubing or pipe D. As shown in FIG. 1, the tubing D is normally located within a casing E. The perforator A is adapted to be located prior to the firing of the perforator A at a selected collar or joint F in the tubing or pipe string D. The perforator A is fired by the manipulation of a wire line on which the periorator tool A is lowered into the well pipe D, or a suitable weight may be dropped on the wire line for dctonataing the explosive charge in the explosive means B of the tool A, as will be explained. Such explosion effects the insertion of the orifice insert C to the position shown in FIG. 1, and thereafter the tool A is removed from the particular location in the tubing D, leaving the insert C in position within the tubing or pipe D for ilow control thcrethrough.

In the particular embodiment illustrated in the drawings, the perforator A inciudes a firing pin body It) which is positioned within a sleeve 11 by means of suitable shear pins 12, or other suitable connecting; means. With the use of the shear pins 12, the sleeve 11 may be separated from the firing pin body it] by a manipulation of the wire line supporting the tool A, if such becomes dcsirable or necessary, so that the fishing neck ltta at the upper end of the body is exposed for a fishing operation, as will be well understood by those skilled in the art.

The upper bore 1% of the firing pin body includes a firing pin rod 14 which is adapted to move downwardly and impart a movement to a tapered firing pin 15 which is located in a tapered lower bore lliic ot' the firing pin body 16. The lower external end of the body It) has external buttress threads 10d, the purpose of which will be explained hereinafter.

The sleeve 11 has one or more openings 11a to prevent a fluid lock within the housing or sleeve 11 as a punch 16 moves with respect to such sleeve 11. The punch E6 is provided with an upper inclined annular shoulder lain which engages a corresponding internal shoulder 11!) in the sleeve It so that when the punch to is in the raised position (FlG. 2A), the entire tool A is supported from the wire line or other means extending to the surface of the well (not shown). In the preferred form of the invention, the punch 16 is suspended in an upper position by means of a shear pin 18 which is located above a shear ring 1.9 and is adapted to be sheared upon a down ward movement of the punch 16. In other words, the pin 18 is sheared by a downward impact or engagement with the shear ring 19 as to permit a movement of the punch 16 downwardly to cause the lower reduced Clltlllleter portion ltib of the punch to enter the bore 1% of the firing pin body it and to strike the upper end of the firing pin rod it to cause it to move downwardly. The upper end of the punch It? may be connected to the wire line (not shown) in any suitable manner, but shown in FIG. 2A, an adapter 20 is threaded by the interengagemcnt of threads 16c and 2th: and by the locking of a pin 21 which extends from the punch 16 into the adapter 29 to prevent rotation thereof. The adapter 20 preferably has a fishing neck 20!) at its upper end which may be used for a fishing operation in some instances. A partial showing of a rope socket 22 in FIG. 2A illustrates one manner of connecting a suitable wire line or cable to the upper end of the tool A. Wire line operated jars are usually connected above the adapter 20.

The firing pin body It) is connected to an explosive chamber body 25 by means of meeting intcrcngaging internal threads 25a and external threads 18d. Such threads are of the buttress type so that they serve to hold the firing pin body It) and the explosive chamber body 25 securely together even with relatively large explosive charges 30. The chamber body 25 has an internal bore 25b which is substantially uniform throughout its length, but at its upper end it is enlarged at 250 to provide a laterul annular shoulder 25d. An explosive chamber housing or cartridge 31 for the explosive St is positioned within the body 25 (FIG. 2B). The chamber housing or cartridge 31 is formed with a laterally extending flange 32 at its upper end which rests upon the shoulder 25d. The flange 22 is provided with a dish-shaped depression or recess 32a for receiving a correspondingly dish-shaped sealing disk 35. When the firing pin body HP is fully threaded into the body 25, the lower end ltlc of the firing pin body it} is in contact with the disk 35 to compress such disk 35 between the body and the flange 32. It is to be noted that the lower end we of the body it is also shaped to fit within the dish-shaped recess 32a. Preferably, the disk 35 is formed of brass so that it provides a fluid-tight seal above the chamber housing 31. For detonating such charge 30, a detonator 38 such as the detonator of a shotgun shell or a blank cartridge is provided in a central opening 32b in the flange 32. Such detonator 33 is of conventional construction and is mounted so as to remain in position above the powder 3! and below the scaling disk 35. Preferably, the firing pin has a firing pin projection 15a which is adapted to puncture the sealing disk 35 and strike the detonator 38 for the detonation of the detonator 38 and the subsequent explosion of the explosive powder or charge 30.

By reason of the provision of the dishshaped recess 32c, and the corresponding dish-shaped disk 35, it is impossible for the disk 35 to shift otf center from the flange Therefore, the proper sealing is always obtained as compared to a fiat disk which is not depressed or shaped as in the present invention. Furthermore, by the lowering of the upper surface of the flange 32 with such recess 3211, the upper inner end 31a of the housing 31 is located below the shoulder 250. so that the powder charge is in a portion of the body 25 having a greater wall thickness than the area thereabove. By locating all of the powder 38 within the relatively thick wall of the body 25, a larger charge of powder can be used in the cartridge or chamber housing 31. Also, the location of the powder within the increased wall thickness provides for further 7 y in the handling of the tool on the surface.

lower end of the chamber housing 31 is closed by a plug 36 which has threads 36a in co-acting interengagcment with threads 31/) on the inner surface of the chamber housing 33. When the powder or charge 39 explodes. the force of such explosion is sullicient to strip, pull apart or sever the threads 31b (FIGS. 1 and 3) to pull a section 31c thereof with the plug 36 as it moves downwardly due to the explosive force (P16. 3). The threads 35a may be stripped or severed instead of the threads 315, or both threads 36a and 311; may be stripped or severed. The stripping or severing of the threads 311; and/or the threads 36:: prevents a re-threading thereof and therefore, the cartridge or chamber housing 31 cannot be re-used by someone inexperienced in the loading of the powder or explosive 3! Therefore, the danger of a re-use of the cartridge 31 is eliminated by means of the threaded plug 36 shown in FIG. 2B.

A seal 37 of neoprene or similar material is positioned beiow the plug 36 and seals against the bore 251; to prevent any substantial loss of explosive pressure when the explosive is fired. A driving wedge 40 is below the seal 37. Such wedge 40 has an inclined surface 40:: (FIG. 2C) which is behind and in engagement with an inclined surface 41a (FIG. 2C) of a carrier 41. The carrier at is adapted to slide laterally in a suitable slot or grooves 42 in the lower stop body 43. Normally, the

carrier 41 is retained in its retracted position (FIG. 2Q) by a shear pin 41c or other suitable means.

The carrier 41 is rclcasably attached to the insert C which has an opening or orifice 44 thcrcthrough. One or more shear pins ill) rclcasably connect the carrier 41 and the insert C so that alter the insert C inserted into the tubing or pipe D, such pin or pins 41b may be sheared for releasing the carrier 41 from the insert C upon the longitudinal movement of the tool A. In order to position the tool A at a desired elevation in a well pipe D, a spring loaded latch 45 is mounted on a pivot pin 36 near the lower end of the tool A (FIG. 21)). The latch 45 is urged radially or laterally outwardly by a spring 47 or other resilient means so as to extend beyond the body 43 (dotted lines in FIG. 1). During the running in of the tool A, the latch 45 is held in a retracted position by a tripper 48 which is pivotally mounted on a pin Such trippcr 48 is held in an upwardly extending position during the running in of the tool A by a shear pin 5? which is adapted to be sheared by the engagement of the upper edge 48a of the tripper with the inside of a collar F (FIG. 1). Such tripping of the tripper 4 S shears the pin 56 and allows it to swing or drop below the latch 45 (FlG. 1), whereby the latch 45 is moved by the resilient leaf spring 47 to its extended latching position for engagement within the collor F. Thus, the tool A is located within a particular collar F so as to properly position the tool A prior to the firing of the explosive charge 3%.

In order to stop the downward movement of the wedge 40, a stop-Wedge 66 having an inclined surface 63a is positioned at the lower end of the body 43. Such stopwedge 60 is maintained at the proper position for receiving the drive wedge 48 by a set screw 6t which projects into a recess 60b. It is to be noted that the recess 60b extends slightly above the set screw 61 to permit limited downward longitudinal movement of the stopwedge 60 relative to the screw 61. The stop-wedge is formed of brass in the preferred case and it is seated upon a washer 62 which is preferably made of hardened steel. The stop-wedge 66 has a fluid passage 600 near its lower end which is in communication with a central opening 62a in the washer 62 and also a central opening in the body 43, the purpose of which will be hereinafter explained. The washer 62 is provided to prevent the jamming of the wedge 60 so tightly into the bottom of the body 43 that it cannot be removed. It is also to be noted that the body 43 preferably has a relief port 430 to prevent a fluid lock as the drive-wedge 40 moves downwardly to the stop-wedge 60.

When the drive-wedge 49 moves downwardly after having forced the carrier 41 and the orifice insert C outwardly, it reaches a position wherein the opening 43a is closed by the drive wedge 40 and grease or other fluid confined below the wedge 40 is then compressed and is forced down through the opening Gtlc and the opening 62a into the area 65. The area 65 is above a latch release piston 70 which is held in an upper retracted position by one or more shear pins 71 (FIG. 2D). While the piston 70 is in its upper retracted position, a spring 72 is confined under compression so that upon the shearing of the pin 71, such spring 72 urges the latch release member or piston 7t? downwardly together with the action of the grease or fluid in the chamber 65 above the piston 70. Thus, when the compressed grease or fluid in the chamber 65 acts on the piston 70 to shear the pin 71, the spring 72 then acts to continue the downward movement of the piston 79 and cause the inclined tapered surface 76:! to move into engagement with an inclined surface 45a on the latch 45 which in turn causes a pivoting or retraction of the latch 45 as shown by the solid lines in FIG. 1. The latch 45 is thus retracted and held in the retracted position by the piston 70. It is to be noted that the piston 70 preferably has a relief hole 70b therethrough to prevent an excessive downward force on the piston 70 by the fluid compressed within the chamher or area 65. If such opening 70b is not provided in the piston 70, the piston 70 is apt to be forced downwardly with such force that it damages the pivot pin 46. The particular size of the opening 7% may of course be varied to control such downward impact by the piston 70 on the latch 45.

In the operation or use of the tool A of this invention with its explosive means B, the tool A is preferably lowered on a wire line or other suitable conventional support extending from the rope socket 22 or other suitable connecting means. While the tool A is being lowered in the tubing or pipe D, the tripper 48 is in the retracted position shown in FIG. 2D and is held in such position by the shear pin 50. The tripper 48 thus serves to hold the latch 45 in the retracted position as the tool A is lowered. Also, the punch 16 is in its raised position as shown in FIG. 2A and is therefore spaced from the firing pin rod 14 to prevent premature firing as the tool A is lowered.

When the elevation in the tubing D has been reached a at which it is desired to insert the orifice insert C, the tool is raised upwardly to engage the edge 48a of the tripper 48 with the collar or joint F to shear the pin 50. Upon a shearing of the pin 59, the tripper 48 drops to the position shown in FIG. 1 and the spring 47 urges the latch 45 to the extended dotted line position shown in FIG. 1. With the latch 45 in the extended position, the tool A is again lowered until such latch 45 catches in the tubing or collar F to stop the downward movement of the tool A.

Thereafter, the line supporting the tool A is jerked or manipulated, preferably with a conventional wire line jarring tool or weight (not shown) to impart a downward force to the punch 16 which causes a shearing or severing of the pin 18 and an impact blow by the punch on the top of the firing pin rod 14. Such blow is transmitted from the rod 14 to the firing pin and to the detonator or shell 38. Upon the explosion of the detonator 38, the entire explosive charge 36 is detonated or fired. The firing of the explosive powder or charge causes the plug 36 to move downwardly and strip the threads 36a from the threads 31b or to pull apart the cartridge at such threads to prevent a re-use of the cartridge or chamber housing 31. The explosive force of the charge or powder 30 transmits a downward movement to the wedge 40 which causes a co-action between its inclined surface 40a and the inner inclined surface 41a of the carrier 41 to move such carrier 41 laterally outwardly. The carrier 41 carries the insert C with it in the lateral movement to cause the orifice insert C to puncture through the pipe or tubing D and position it for permitting subsequent flow through the orifice 44.

The downward movement of the drive-wedge 40 continues until it is stopped by the stop-wedge 60. Also, as explained above, when the drive-wedge 40 reaches its lower limit, it forces the grease or other fluid under compression into the chamber 65 above the piston 70 and causes a shearing of the pin 71. The coil spring 72 thereafter urges the piston 70 downwardly to cause a release of the latch 45 to the solid line position of FIG. 1 so that the tool A can therefore be raised or lowered as desired within the tubing D. With the orifice insert C in the tubing D as shown in FIG. 1, a longitudinal movement of the carrier 41 with the tool A severs the shear pins 41b and leaves the insert C in the pipe D after the tool A is moved.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention is illustrative and explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A tool having an explosive means therewith, the

improvement residing in said explosive means, including:

(a) an explosive chamber housing having an upper flange and a chamber therebelow for receiving explosive powder,

(b) said flange also having a dish-shaped depression in its upper lateral surface, and

(c) a dish-shaped sealing disk generally conforming in shape to said depression for forming a seal for the upper end of said chamber housing.

2. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

(a) a detonator disposed in said flange below said sealing disk and adapted to detonate said explosive powder.

3. A tool having an explosive therewith, the improvement residing in:

(a) an explosive chamber body having a tubular inner bore and an internal lateral shoulder,

(b) an explosive chamber housing having an inner chamber for receiving an explosive charge,

(c) said housing also having an external laterally extending flange forming the upper end of said chambcr,

(d) a sealing disk on said flange,

(e) a firing pin body in said bore of said explosive chamber body above said shoulder and in contact with said sealing disk, and

(f) buttress threads on said explosive chamber body and said firing pin body for holding them together with said scaling disk in sealing contact between said firing pin body and said flange to prevent fluids from entering said inner chamber.

4. A tool having an explosive means therewith, the

' improvement residing in:

(a) an explosive chamber body having a tubular inner bore and an internal lateral shoulder,

(b) an explosive chamber housing having an inner chamber for receiving an explosive charge,

(c) said housing also having an external laterally extending flange forming the upper end of said chamber,

(d) said flange having a dish-shaped recess in its upper surface,

(e) a dish-shaped sealing disk seated in said recess of said flange, and

(f) a firing pin body connected to said explosive chamher body for holding said sealing disk in scaling contact with and between said flange and said firing pin body.

5. A tool having an explosive means therewith, the improvement residing in:

(a) an explosive chamber body having a tubular inner bore and an internal lateral shoulder,

(b) an explosive chamber housing having an inner chamber for receiving an explosive charge,

(c) said housing also having an external laterally extending flange forming the upper end of said chamber,

(d) said flange having a dishshaped recess in its upper surface,

(e) a dish-shaped sealing disk seated in said recess of said flange,

(f) a firing pin body connected to said explosive chamber body for holding said sealing disk in sealing contact with and between said flange and said firing pin body, and

(g) buttress threads on said explosive chamber body and said firing pin body for holding them connected together with said sealing disk compressed therebetween to provide an eflicient seal.

6. A tool having an explosive means therewith, the improvement residing in said explosive means, including:

(a) an explosive chamber housing having an upper flange and a chamber therebelow [or receiving explosive powder,

(b) a plug closing the lower end of said chamber housing, and

(c) severable co-acting threads on said plug and said housing for holding said plug in said housing until the powder explodes.

7. A tool having an explosive means therewith, the improvement residing in:

(a) an explosive chamber body having a tubular inner bore and an internal lateral shoulder,

(b) an explosive chamber housing having an inner chamber for receiving an explosive charge,

(c) said housing also having an external laterally extending flange forming the upper end of said chamher and resting on said internal lateral shoulder,

(d) the inner surface of said upper end of said chamber being disposed below said shoulder to surround 8 said charge in said chamber with a portion of said chamber body having a relatively thick wall.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,185,303 1/40 Kinley 16655.4 2,262,925 11/41 Cole 16655.5 2,336,812 12/43 Spencer 166-55.4 2,381,081 8/45 Schlumberger l66-55.5 2,426,106 8/47 Kinley 166-553 2,667,837 2/54 Musser et al. 102-44 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,604 11/94 Great Britain.

BENJAMIN HERSH, Primary Examiner.

CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2185303 *Jul 1, 1938Jan 2, 1940Kinley Myron MWire line shooting tool
US2262925 *Aug 7, 1939Nov 18, 1941Cole Cawthern CProjectile and barrel for gun type perforators
US2336812 *Oct 12, 1942Dec 14, 1943Lane Wells CoFiring mechanism for gun perforators
US2381081 *Jan 23, 1940Aug 7, 1945Marcel SchlumbergerGun perforator
US2426106 *Jul 31, 1942Aug 19, 1947Kinley Myron MMeans for explosively inserting orifices in pipe in wells
US2667837 *May 22, 1951Feb 2, 1954Turnbull Norman KHermetically sealed explosive cartridge
GB189422604A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3366179 *Aug 18, 1965Jan 30, 1968Kinley John CWell tool having safety means to prevent premature firing
US3447604 *Jul 13, 1967Jun 3, 1969Kinley John CSafety assembly for impact-actuated well tool
US3912013 *Nov 11, 1974Oct 14, 1975Vann Roy RandellHigh temperature perforating method
US3990507 *Oct 14, 1975Nov 9, 1976Vann Roy RandellHigh temperature perforating apparatus
US4078611 *Nov 5, 1976Mar 14, 1978Vann Roy RandellHigh temperature perforating method
US4624307 *Sep 26, 1985Nov 25, 1986J. C. Kinley CompanyExplosive perforating tool
US5908365 *Feb 5, 1997Jun 1, 1999Preeminent Energy Services, Inc.Downhole triggering device
US7487833 *May 18, 2006Feb 10, 2009Schlumberger Technology CorporationSafety apparatus for perforating system
US8056632Apr 3, 2008Nov 15, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole initiator for an explosive end device
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/636, 166/63, 102/531, 89/1.15
International ClassificationB21D28/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D28/007
European ClassificationB21D28/00C