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Publication numberUS3200817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 17, 1965
Filing dateDec 5, 1961
Priority dateDec 5, 1961
Publication numberUS 3200817 A, US 3200817A, US-A-3200817, US3200817 A, US3200817A
InventorsBrainard Benson C
Original AssigneeBrainard Benson C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray container shield enclosure
US 3200817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 17, 1965 B. c. BRAINARD SPRAY CONTAINER SHIELD ENCLOSURE Filed Dec. 5, 1961 INVENTOR [vwso/v C. 5/?A/NARD BY .Enm I ORNEY cap in angular relation to the spray container.

United States Patent 3,200,817 SPRAY CONTAINER SHiELD ENCLQSURE Benson C. Brainard, 14 E. Gairs Road, North Oaks, Minn. Filed Dec. 5, 1961, Ser. No. 157,113 9 Qlaims. (Cl. 128--173) The present application is a continuation-in-part of my previous application for Spray Container Shield Closure, Serial Number 836,633 filed August 28, 1959, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a spray container shield enclosure and deals particularly with a container having a spray head in which the container is provided with a removable closure which may either seal the spray head or which may act as a spray shield. Spray containers of the type used to spray a liquid or powdered material must in some instances be protected by a cap or enclosure which prevents the spray head from becoming contaminatcd with dust or dirt between spraying operations. As an example, spray containers containing an eye lotion must be carefully protected from dust and dirt to prevent even the infinitesimal particles of dirt from being sprayed upon the surface of the eye. Such spray containers must also usually be provided with a shield designed to confine the finely divided spray in the proper direction. It is a purpose of the present invention to provide a spray container with a cap or closure, which, in one position, forms an enclosure for the spray head and prevents this spray head from becoming contaminated by dust and dirt. This cap or closure is also designed to form a shield which is designed to enclose the spray head and to direct the finely divided mist in the proper direction when it is not use as a spray head closure.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a spray receptacle of suitable shape and design equipped with a spray head through which a finely divided mist may be dispensed. The container is provided with a cap which frictionally engages the upper end of the container and which normally completely encloses the spray head to form an effective protection against dust and dirt which might otherwise come to rest on the spray head to contaminate the material being sprayed. This cap or closure is provided with an aperture which is closed by the spray container when the spray is not in use so that dust and dirt cannot come in contact with the spray head. This aperture is of proper dimensions to frictionally engage the spray head when the cap is removed from the container so that the spray head may be inserted through the wall of the cap, and so that the cap may form a shield for guiding the spray in the proper direction.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a spray container including a cap preferably formed of resilient plastic which is unaffected by the prodnot being sprayed. This cap is provided with an open end which in one position encloses a portion of the spray container and forms a dust proof enclosure for the spray head. By removing this cap from the container and turning the cap into angular relation to the container, the spray head may be inserted through an opening in the cap, the cap may serve as a shield for the spray, and the finely divided product may be sprayed through the open end of the cap which normally en circles the container.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a spray container including a cap having a pair of similar openings in opposite walls thereof, either of which is designed to accommodate the spray head extending therethrough to frictionally support the In opera- 3,29%,817 Patented Aug. 17, 1$65 "ice tion, the spray head extends through one of these openings to terminate between the two openings. The opposite aperture is designed to form a light opening as well as a means for admitting air into the cap. When the device is used as a spray for eye lotion, the spray head normally extends through the lower aperture while the opposite upper aperture provides a means of admitting light to the interior of the cap. This arrangement is important in view of the fact that there is a natural tendency for a person to close the eyelid of the eye being sprayed as soon as the spraying operation is begun. There is a natural tendency for the person using the spray to look toward the light opening in the cap which means that the eyelid is in fully open position at the beginning of the spraying operation. As a result, there is a greater chance for the spray to contact the eye before the eyelid is involuntarily closed. Furthermore, as the spray is a finely divided mist, much of the spray will remain suspended in the air within the shield until the eye is again open. As the eye is opened, the view is involuntariiy directed toward the light source in the top of the shield, permitting a certain amount of the spray suspended in the air within the shield to contact the surface of the eye.

Most persons who use an eye lotion experience dithculty in applying the lotion directly to the surface of the eye. If an eye dropper is used to apply the liquid, most of the liquid never reaches the surface of the eyeball because of the natural impulse for the eyelid to close during the process. Eye cups are somewhat more effective, but it is still difficult and almost impossible for some persons to open their eyes when the eye is submerged in the liquid. 1 have found that most persons can withstand a finely divided mist directed toward the eye than can stand other methods of application. This is particularly true if the mist is confined Within a shield, and if the shield includes a light aperture in its upper surface, as the eye is involuntarily directed toward the light aperture as soon as it is open, thereby exposing a greater area of the eyeball to the mist. Once the mist is on the surface of the eyeball, it is readily spread over the surface of the eyeball by movement of the eyeball and eyelid.

An added feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a spray container of the type described including upon its walls a pair of rounded projections designed to extend into the openings extending through opposite walls of the cap. This arrangement serves the double purpose of maintaining the cap in frictional engagement with the container, and also preventing dust and similar material from gathering on the walls of the apertures when the cap is in normal position enclosing the spray head.

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part of the specification;

*IGURE 1 is a front elevational View of the spray container in closed position.

FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view through the container, the position of the section being indicated by the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of the upper portion of the apparatus with the closure removed and positioned as a shield for the material being sprayed.

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of the apparatus in readiness for the spraying operation, a portion of the apparatus being shown in section.

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of the spray container with the cap removed therefrom.

The spray container is indicated in general by the letter A and includes a bottom portion which is designated in general by the numeral it? and a cap portion which is designated in general by the numeral 11. The cap portion 11 is designed to telescope over the upper portion of the spray container and to be frictionally supported in telescoping relation. Both portions of the container are preferably formed of a somewhat flexible resilient plastic material so that the container itself may comprise what is often referred to as a Squeeze Bottle and so that the cap portion may frictionally engage over the upper end of the container. In the particular design of construction illustrated, the spray container It) includes outwardly bulged front and rear walls 12, and outwardly bulged side walls 13, the container being of greatest cross sectional area at approximately its center point. A bottom wall 14 connects the side and end walls, and the top wall 15 of the container includes a centrally located cylindrical neck 16. The front and rear walls 12 and side walls 13 are inwardly offset as indicated at 17 so that the telescoping walls of the cap ll will conform to the general contour of the cont-ainer and not project outwardly therefrom.

The spray head 19 which may be of any suitable type, but which is preferably of the type illustrated in my application for patent for Spray Head, Serial Number 854,423, filed November 20, 1959. This spray head is frictionally engaged in the bottle neck 16 and supports a fiuid supply tube 20 extending to a point near the bottom 14 of the container. The spray head 19 is provided with an air passage 21 which leads to a point above the tube 20 so N that as air is forced through the passage 21, liquid is drawn through the tube 24) to combine with the air. The

' upper end of the spray head 16 is provided with cylindrical groove 22 which is designed to accommodate a sleeve 23 extending downwardly from the top enclosure 7 V 24 of the cap ii.

The cap 11 is provided with a peripheral wall structure including tapered front and rear Walls 25 and tapered side walls 26 which are shaped to fit the conformation of the upper portion of the container 153 and to fit snugly thereagainst when the cap is in container closing position. Circular projections 27 are provided on opposite sides of the front and rear walls of the container 10 adjoining the upper end thereof. The projections 27 are preferably tapered and project from the normal contour of the front and rear Walls 29 of the upper portion of the container 10 a distance which is less at the upper end thereof than at the lower end thereof, as is indicated in FIGURE 4 of the drawings.

The front and rear walls 25 of the cap 11 are provided with opposed apertures 39 which are of proper diameter to accommodate the projections 27, and which are also of proper diameter to frictionally fit about the neck 16 of the container body. It is not absolutely essential that both of the apertures be of the same diameter, but from a practical standpoint it has been found desirable, as the cap may then be applied to the neck 15 of the container with either side of the cap uppermost. Obviously, if one of the apertures were relatively small, it would be necessary to choose which side of the cap was to fit on to the bottleneck 16 for spraying operation.

As is indicated in FIGURE 3 of the drawings, and as also may be noted in FIGURE 5, the bottle neck 16 is provided with laterally extending flanges 32. having arouate ends which are designed to engage against the walls 26 of the cap 11 to guide the sleeve 23 into the cylindrical groove 22 in the spray head 19. These flanges simplify the application of the cap over the container and spray head when the container is not in use. The flanges 32 tend to center the upper portion of the cap with respect to the container as the container is closed. Furthermore, the cap 11 and container it are of sufiiciently flexible and resilient material so that the cap may spring over the circular projections 27 in the closing operation, and the cap .may bepulled from the container body although the withdrawal of the cap is made more diilicult by the engage merit of the projections 27 into the apertures 35 to prevent accidental disengagement of the cap.

In the operation of the device, the cap 11 is usually telescoped on to the container Id as indicated in FIG- URES -1 and 2 of the drawings; However, when the product is to be sprayed, particularly when the apparatus is used as an eye spray, the cap 11 is removed from the body, and the container neck 16 in inserted into one of the openings 39 in the manner illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4 of the drawings. The cap is preferably applied so that the outlet of the spray is directed toward the open end of the cap as in FIGURE 4. By holding the open end of the cap adjacent an eye, and applying a general pressure to the walls of the container 1-2, a very finely divided mist issues from the spray toward the open end of the cap, and thus toward the eyeball.

As is evident from FIGURES 3 and 4 of the drawings, the opening 3t) which is opposite the one accommodating the bottle neck in; is directly above the spray head. If the open end of the cap is held closely adjacent the eye, the e is a natural tendency for the eye to look toward the open ing 3%, and this tendency opens the eye to a greater extent than normal. In other words, the eye looks upwardly at an angle toward the light opening. As a result, during the spraying operation, more time is required to close the eye than would be true if the eyelid were in only partially open position. It should be understood that the operator desires to apply the lotion to the eyeball and therefore attempts to keep the eye open durin the spraying operation. However, the eyelid will often close involuntarily as the spray starts and the eyelid will normally blink closed. However, as the spray is in finely divided form and is confined within the shield, the operator will nor mally open his eye immediately after closing it, and will instinctively look toward the light opening, permitting the spray to contact the eyeball.

The container neck 16 also includes a peripheral flange 33 which is spaced from the flanges 32 a distance substantially equal to the thickness of the front and rear Walls 29 or" the cap H. The flange 33 is of a diameter slightly greater than the diameter of the openings 30 in the cap. As a result, the cap must be forced over the flange 33 during insertion of the neck through an opening. The cap is then securely fixed to the container during use. This perits the edge of the cap to be pressed firmly against the eyelid during the spraying operation, thus assisting in holding the eyelid open. The material used is sufiiciently resilient to permit attachment and detachment of the cap with a snapping motion; and the resilience ofthe cap also permits the cup to engage against the eyelidfirmly, and yet Without excessive force.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in spray container shield enclosure, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to'have it understood that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

ll. In combination with an elongated walled container having a spray head provided with a substantially cylindrical periphery projecting from an end thereof, a cap having an end closure and encircling walls secured thereto and depending therefrom, the walls of said cap being adapted to frictionally engage over the walls of said container when in spray head enclosing position, said .walls of said cap having a pair of opposed rounded apertures therethrou h, and rounded projections on opposite sides of said container walls, said projections being similar in shape and size to said apertures and positioned to extend into said apertures when said cap is in spray head enclosing position.

2. The structure of claim It and in which said apertures are of adiarneter substantially equal to that of the cylindrical spray head periphery to frictionally accommodate said spray head extending therethrough.

3. The structure of claim 1 and including flange means on said cap engageable with said spray head to hold the cap centered with respect to said spray head.

4. The structure of claim 2 and including a peripheral flange of resilient material on said spray head capable of flexing through one of said apertures.

5. In combination with a container having a spray head projecting from an end thereof, said spray head having a portion thereof adjoining the said container end of substantially cylindrical periphery, a cup-shaped cap having an end closure and peripheral encircling walls attached thereto, the end of said cap opposite said end closure being open, said encircling walls having a pair of opposed apertures therein intermediate said end closure and said open end, at least one of said apertures being of a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of said spray head portion whereby said cap may be frictionally engaged on said spray head portion, said spray head eing of a length to terminate Within said cap when said cap is engaged thereon, the other said aperture being open to atmosphere and in substantially aligned spaced relation to said spray head when said cap is engaged thereupon.

6. In combination with a container having a spray head thereon, a cup-shaped cap comprising an end closure and continuous peripheral walls marginally connected thereto, said cap having an open end opposite said end closure, said peripheral walls having a pair of opposed openings therethrough intermediate the end closure and the open end thereof, at least one of said openings having an outline shape substantially similar to the peripheral cross-sectional shape of said spray head whereby said cap may be frictionally engaged on said spray head with said spray head extending through said one opening, said spray head terminating Within said cap in spaced relation to the other said opening when said one opening frictionally engages said spray head, the other said opening being open to atmosphere and substantially aligned with said spray head when said spray head extends through said one opening.

7. The structure of claim 6 and in which the walls of said cap are frictionally engageable over the walls of said container to enclose the said spray head.

8. The structure of claim 6 and including a pair of rounded projections on opposite sides of said container adapted to engage into said openings in said cap when said cap is frictionally engaged over the walls of the container.

9. In combination with a walled container having a spray head projecting therefrom, said spray head having a portion thereof adjoining said container of substantially cylindrical periphery, and a pair of projections extending from said container on opposite outer surfaces thereof, a cup-shaped cap of flexible resilient material including an end closure and encircling peripheral Walls engageable over said spray head and fitting snugly over the upper portion of said container, said cap having a pair of opposed apertures therein in the walls thereof into which said oppositely located projections may extend to hold said cap engaged on said container, said projections substantially filling said apertures when engaged therein, said apertures being of a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of said spray head portion, whereby said cap may be frictionally engaged thereon.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,132,925 3/15 Gillette 220- 2,890,697 6/59 Van Sickle 239-337 3,006,340 10/61 Meshberg 128-208 3,012,555 12/61 Meshberg 128203 ADELE M. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1132925 *Oct 28, 1908Mar 23, 1915King Camp GilletteBlade-box.
US2890697 *Mar 15, 1957Jun 16, 1959Sickle Wilton E VanEnclosed medicament container and atomizer
US3006340 *Mar 3, 1958Oct 31, 1961Philip MeshbergDispensing package
US3012555 *May 18, 1959Dec 12, 1961Philip MeshbergDispensing package for material under pressure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3314426 *May 20, 1964Apr 18, 1967Lever Brothers LtdEyecup and spray dispenser
US3506001 *Nov 4, 1966Apr 14, 1970Colgate Palmolive CoEye-spraying device having mirror
US4052985 *Jun 28, 1976Oct 11, 1977Coleman D JacksonApparatus for medicinally spraying an eyeball
US5078129 *Mar 8, 1990Jan 7, 1992Research Foundation Of State University Of New YorkDevice for stimulating salivation
US6325784Jun 10, 1999Dec 4, 2001Lenard L. MuroffMirrored eye drop target and method therefor
US8034036 *Mar 11, 2008Oct 11, 2011Tom OsbornePortable eye flushing system and method
WO2013142607A1 *Mar 20, 2013Sep 26, 2013Duke UniversityDevices and methods of administering opthalmic medications
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/200.14, D24/110, 206/438, 239/337, 604/192
International ClassificationA61H35/02, A61H35/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H35/02
European ClassificationA61H35/02