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Publication numberUS3201122 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 17, 1965
Filing dateJul 22, 1963
Priority dateJul 22, 1963
Publication numberUS 3201122 A, US 3201122A, US-A-3201122, US3201122 A, US3201122A
InventorsJeff Horwitz
Original AssigneeJeffco Games Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Solitaire gin rummy game
US 3201122 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. T, 1965 J, HQRWRTZ BQLE SOLITAIRE GIN RUMMY GAME Filed July 22, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet l I N VEN TOR.

JEFF Hoawwz /WLL/ W4] Aug- 17 1955 J. HoRwlTz 3,201,122

SOLITAIRE GIN RUMMY GAME Filed July 22, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i (D KKQIO99452A GQ19876445 ur'ruNzm "1j TTL* (D mscnnus l KKQIO99452AK EQ.) 8 876443 QOJ 8876443 You DRAW (D KKK|O99452A YOU KKK|099542A msm @m8876443 www INVENTOR. IE- FF HQRWWZ BY United States Patent O 3,201,122 SLHTAEUE GEN RUMMY GAME `letti Horwitz, Winnetlra, llh, assigner to lietfco Games, lne., Winnetira, lill. Filed July 22, 1963, Ser. No. 296,731. Claims. (Cl. 273-1) This invention relates generally to soli-taire games and more particularly to a solitaire game which most` realistica-lly simulates actual playing situations and conditions lof the card game, vgin rum-my.

Board-type games which may be played by one or more players are -of course `well known and extremely popular. Similarly, there have been provided numerous solitaire board-type games which simulate the playing of various card games, .such as bridge and poker. However, despite the fact that gin rummy is probably the -most popular of all two handed card games, applicant is unaware of any game to be played by one player which simulates and teaches gin rummy.`

The lack of a solitaire gin rummy game may .of course be attributed to the diticulty in reproducing those playing conditions which are distinctively peculiar to that game. Thus, for example, those skilled in :the art will appreciate that in gin tummy, each player must pick up a card and then discard that card or another `one from his hand, whereupon the other player then has the option of picking up the discard `or taking a card from the deck. The `simulation `of these playing conditions has heretofore tapparently deiied reproduction.

It is therefore an important object of this invention to providea solitaire game which most realistically simulates the actual playing of gin tummy.

Another object is to afford a solitaire gin ruminy game of the character described which is compact in size `and thus may be readily transported and enjoyed at any time. A related object is lto afford such a solitaire gin rumrny game which does not require any supporting structure :such as a table. Thus, the game may be enjoyably played under normally `adverse conditions, such as, while riding in an ainplane or automobile.

A further object is to provide a solitaire gin rummy game of the character described which is extremely `simple to play in that it does not require the removal and/or insertion of game sheets at the end of each round of play. ln this regard, the invention contemplates the use of a relatively long and continuous scroll on which is printed the various card indicia and other intelligence.

Still another object is to afford a solitaire gin rummy game ofthe character described which contains a substantial number lof different playing hands. Arelated `object is to afford such a game in which the scroll may ibe readily removed and replaced by other scrolls so that the different hand possibilites are unlimited.

Yet another object is to provide -a solitaire gin tummy game of the character described in which the opponents hand may be maintained in secrecy and then exposed upon completion of the hand, as in actual .play of gin rummy. A relate-d object is to provide such a solitaire gin rummy game in which the opponents hand may be obs-cured or, if preferred, revealed at all times during play -so that the player may observe the techniques of his expert opponent.

Still a further `object is to afford a solitaire gin rumrny game of the character described which may be inexpensively fabricated and yet is most amusing and educational .for the purpose-s intended.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, arrangement and a combination of parts hereinafter fully described,

ZdLlZZ Patented Ang'. i7, 1965 ICC illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size and minor details `of the structure may ibe rnade without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.`

For Ithe purpose of facilitating an understanding of my invention, I have illustrated in the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment thereof, from an inspection of which, when considered in connection with the following description, my invention, its mode of construction, assembly and operation, and many of its advantages should be readily understood and appreciated.

Referring to the drawings in which the same characters of reference are employed to indicate corresponding or similar part-s throughout the several figures of the drawings:

FIG. l is a top plan view of a solitaire gin rummy game embodying the principles 'of the invention, (with portions broken away for convenience of illustration);

FIG. 2 is a Vertical cross-sectional View taken on the plane `of line 2-2 in PIG. l and viewed in the direction indicatedgt fFlG. 3 is a cross-sectional View taken on the plane of line 3-3 in FIG. l and viewed in the direction indicated;

FlG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view illustrating the relationship -of parts when the opponents hand is exposed;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional View taken on the plane of line 5 5 in FiG. 3 and viewed in the direction indicated;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a fragment of the scroll and illustrating some of the card indicia and other intelligence thereon; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the game board but showing the end Wall thereof swinging outwardly for removal of the rollers and scroll.

Referring more particularly to the various gures of the drawings, it will be seen that the reference numeral 10 indicates generally a novel game structure embodying the principles of :the invention. The game structure lil comprises a box-like member M consisting of a rectangular base 12, a pair of side walls l-i and a pair of end walls 16.

Removably positioned within the box member lll and closing the top thereof is an open-bottomed rectangular game board i8 having atop face Ztl, a pair of side walls 22 and a pair of end walls 24 and Z6. As indicated in the various figures of the drawings, the dimensions of the walls of the game board lil are substantially identical but slightly smaller than those of the base 12 so that the game board telescopes snugly but readily removably within the base.

A panel 2S is secured to the inner surface of each of the end walls 24 and 26, and each of said panels is formed with a pair of aligned holes 30, 36B (see FlGS. 2, 5 and 7).

lt is impontant to note that the end wall 2d and its associated panel 28 are connected to the top face Ztl by means of a suitable hinge 32. Thus the end wall 26 may be swung outwardly `away from the adjacent side walls 22 for reasons which will become apparent as the description proceeds. Y

Rotatably journalled in the pairs of aligned holes 30 is a pair ofspindles or rollers 34 and 35 which may be cylindrical in cross section as indicated. Each of the rollers 34 and 35 has rigidly mounted thereon a pair of spaced operating wheels or handles 36, 35. The handles 36 may be circumferentially knurled or notched as indicated, and it will be observed lthat the same project in a plane normal to the longitudinal axes of the rollers. Mounted on and between the rollers 34 and 35 is a continuous scroll-38 which has its opposite ends suitably connected one to each of said rollers. The scroll 38 has printed or otherwise suitably marked thereon tive longitudinal columns of card indica and intelligence as shownrin FlG. 6 of the` drawings. The first lcolumn i0 indicates the number of the hand being played, and this number remains constant until the particular hand is completed, at which time it changes to the next number. Thus, a single scroll Sdmay contain as many complete hands as desired. The second column l2 bears the card indicia of the players hand and illustrates the exact state land arrangement of his card at all stages of theV game. The third column 44 contains the intelligence which directs the player and his opponent to draw and discard a card in .alternating sequence. Column d6 shows the card which has been discarded by the player and his opponent, and likewise contains the intelligence at the end of a hand of whether the player or his opponent has called or made gin The last column 43 bears the card indicia of the opponents hand and likewise shows the exact state of his hand at all stages of the game. Column 44 may likewise bear intelligence and indicia giving the player an opportunity to decide his own play as to whether to go for gin or to calL Returning to FIG. l of the drawings, it will be seen that the top face 2t) of the game board is provided with four slots 5t) positioned so that the operating handles 3d may project therethrough. Similarly, the top face is formed with a window S2 for viewing the same number, a window 54 for viewing the players hand, a monitor window 56 for observing the playing instructions, a stock or discard window 53 for viewing the last discard, representation of a stock pile 59 adjacent said window 53, and a window 6) through which may be viewed the opponents hand. ft will likewise be noted that a flap 62 is pivotally connected to the top face 29 as at 64, said ldap being adapted to pivot between a position wherein it covers or obscures the window dil (FIG. 1) to a position wherein the window 60 is completely exposed (FlG. 4). A cooperating box-like cover (not shown) may likewise be provided for covering the entire game structure it). l Actual play of the game lil should by now be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Thus, at the beginning of game number 1, substantially the entire scroll 3S is wound around the bottom roller 35. The player now manipulates the upper roll 3d by turning the handles 36 in the direction indicated by the arrows in FIG. 1, all the while making the plays and observing the opponents discards as in .the actual game of gin tummy.

To start the game, the scroll 38 is positioned so that through the monitor window 56 there appears, for example, the indicia you will draw. When so positioned in the monitor window, two hands of cards are positioned, one in the window 54 entitled your hand and the other in the window 60 entitled opponents hand (see FIG. l). Y

After the playerV has studied his hand to decide whether to draw from the stock pile 59 or from the discard 46,

the upper scroll handle or wheel 36 with roller 31d is rotated so that the next indicia is brought into view in the monitor window. If the draw is from the stock pile 59, then "the card in the discard 46 will not change. It the draw is from the discard, the discard indicia 46 Vwill change. The new card drawn will appear in the players hand as the last card. On the next wheel turn, the new card will automatically be properly grouped in the players hand. Y

The indicia which will appear in the monitor window 56 will be you discard. After the player has decided which card to discard, the wheel 36 is again rotated to the next indicia, opponent draws. If the card which then appears in the discard window S8 is the one the player decided to discard, it indicates good card judgment. There may be some difference of opinion as to the correct card to discard butv the game is set up so that `there is little ques-tion asV to the correct card for the proper gin play.

The wheel 3d is once more rotated to the next indicia opponent discards. If the card in the discard pile changes, it indicates that he has drawn a discard card. if it does not change, it indicates that he has drawn from stock.

Again the wheel 36 is rotated to you draw. Gpponents discard will appear in discard window 53.

The game is continued in this manner until the player is ready to call or gin or until opponent calls or ,gins. If player does not wish to call when a play sequence shows call, player may turn wheel 36 to the next card sequence and take an alternate discard and continue to play to gin or a lower score. The player takes the risk, of course, of having opponent call or gin first. At the end of game 1 opponents hand may be exposed by opening the iiap 62 Iand the winner can then be determined.

At Vthe end of game number 1, the player may continue on through as many games as he desires, or until the entire scroll 38 has been transferred to the upper roller 3d. During play of all or any of the hands, the player may cover or expose the opponents hand by pivoting the ilap 62, as he desires. t

After completion of all hands on the scroll 38, the scroll may be rewound back onto the bottom roller 35 so that the same hands may be re-played.V When the player feels that he has mastered all of the hands on a single scroll, he may then remove the game board from the base 12. lt is now a simple matter to swing to the end wall 26 outwardly and remove the Scroll 38 and its attached rollers 34 and 35 (see FIG. 7). A new set of rollers with a scroll bearing a completeV set of new hands may now be inserted into the game board. Thus, the number of possible different hands is limitless.

From the foregoing description and drawings,it should be apparent that I have provided a novel solitaire game which most realistically simulates the actual playing conditions of gin tummy. The entire game structure may be completely fabricated from common inexpensive materials such as paper and paperboard. The number of different hands is limitless because it is a simple matter to replace the scroll and rollers. In addition, the game is convenient and simple to operate, and yet is most enjoyable and educational toy the player.

It is believed that my invention, its mode of construction and assembly, and many of its advantages should be readily understood from the foregoing without further description, and it should also be manifest that while a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described for illustrative purpose, the structural details are nevertheless capable of wide variation within the purview of my invention as delined in the appended claims.

What I claim and desire to'secure by Letter Patent of the United States is:

1. A solitaire gin rumrny card game comprising:

a base member;

an inverted box-like game board mounted in said base member, said game board including a top face and a pair of opposed end walls;

bearing means on said end walls',

a-t least one roller securely and rotatably journalled in said bearing means when said game board is mounted in said base member;

a Vscroll having card indicia and other intelligence connected tosaidone roller;

actuatingmeans connected to said one roller for rotating said one rollerto move said scroll therearound;v and hinge means for pivotally connecting at least one of said end walls to said top face to permit the removal of said one roller from said bearing means whenV said one pivotally connected end wall is swung out-V .ifi wardly, said top face being formed with a plurality of windows for viewing said card indica and intelligence.

2. The solita-ire gin rnmrny card game of claim l, wherein said end walls include circular openings, the structure defining said openings affording said bearing means.

3. The solitaire gin rummy card game of claim l, wherein a tlap is secured to the inner surface of each of said game board end walls, each oi said ilaps being formed with a pair of aligned circular openings, the

structure defining said openings affording said bearing means,

4. A solitaire gin rummy card game comprising:

a box-like base member having a bottom, a pair of side walls and a pair of end walls;

an inverted box-like game board, said game board including a top face, a pair of side walls and a pair of end walls, said end walls including openings, said game board being removably and telescopically positioned in said box-like base manner;

a pair of horizontally` spaced rollers securely and rotatably journalled between said game board end Walls and in said circular openings when said game board is positioned in said base member;

a scroll having card indica and other indicia attached to and between said rollers;

actuating means connected to said rollers for rotating said rollers to move said scroll therebetween; and

hinge means pivotally connecting at least one of said end Walls to said top face for providing outward swinging of said one end wall to permit the removal of said rollers and attached scroll and replacement with another pair of rollers and attached scroll,

6:3 said top face being formed with a plurality of windows for viewing said card indicia and other intelligence.

5'. A solitaire card gaine comprising:

a game board including a top face and a pair of opposed end walls;

a iiap -secured to the inner surface of each of said game board end Walls, each of said tlaps being formed with circular openings, the structure deiining said openings affording a bearing means;

at least one roller rotatably journalled in said bearing means;

a scroll having card indicia and other intelligence conneoted to said one roller;

actuating means connected to said one roller for rotating said one roller to move to said scroll therearound for viewing said card indicia and intelligence; and

hinge means for pivotally connecting at least one of said end walls to said top face to permit the removal of said one roller when said one pivotally connected end wall is swung outwardly,

References @ited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RTCHARD C. PNKHAM, Primary Examiner.

DELBERT B. LOWE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1548510 *Jan 19, 1923Aug 4, 1925Clay William RAuto score
US1587685 *Jun 5, 1923Jun 8, 1926Tillinghast Elbert REducational device
US1756208 *Mar 12, 1928Apr 29, 1930Mattie PeelenTeaching device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3334102 *Feb 27, 1964Aug 1, 1967Du PontQuinolonoquinolone pigments and substituted derivatives thereof
US3689071 *Jun 28, 1971Sep 5, 1972George F KuceraBlackjack or 21 game simulator
US4380334 *Mar 24, 1980Apr 19, 1983Mattel, Inc.Electronic card game simulator
EP0042864A1 *Dec 5, 1980Jan 6, 1982Mattel, Inc.Electronic card game simulator
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/138.1, 273/148.00R, 273/149.00R, 273/461, 434/129
International ClassificationA63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/00
European ClassificationA63F9/00