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Publication numberUS3202801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1965
Filing dateJul 11, 1962
Priority dateJul 11, 1962
Publication numberUS 3202801 A, US 3202801A, US-A-3202801, US3202801 A, US3202801A
InventorsSam P Saluri
Original AssigneeSam P Saluri
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Body heating means
US 3202801 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A11g 24, 1965 s. P. sALURl 3,202,801

BODY HEATING MEANS Filed July ll, 1962 INVENTOR. S 1D. Sl 01?/ ,mm @@ff/@M United States Patent O 3,202,801 BODY HEATING MEANS Sam P. Saluti, 1033y 16th St., West Des Moines, Iowa Filed July 11, 1962, Ser. No. 209,126 2 Claims. (Cl. 219-528) This invention relates to body heating means and more particularly to an electrically heated, heating pad.

The use of heating pads using resistance wire as the heating means is old. In general, such heating pads consist of a 'pad structure of cloth, rubber, felt or the like, and in which is embedded the resistance wire which, in tp/rm is adapted to be electrically connected to a source uw, ot' electricity. Such common heating pads are relatively lightweight and are incapable of retaining heat for any substantial period of time after they have been turned olf. Also, they are not constructed so as to closely conform with or adhere to that part of the body which they engage.

Therefore, one of the principal objects of my invention is to provide an electric heating pad that will provide pressure as well as heat to that part of the body area being heat treated.

A further object of this invention is to provide a heating pad that will conform with the surface irregularities of the body area of which it engages.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an electric heating pad that will remain in a warm state long after it has been disconnected from a source of electrical energy.

Still further objects of my invention are to provide an electrical heating pad that is economical in manufacture, durable in use, and refined in appearance.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

My invention consists in the construction, arrangements, and combination, of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in my claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of my heating pad;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the heating pad, taken on line 2-2 of FIG. l; and

FIG. 3 is a horizontal sectional view of the device taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and more fully illustrates its construction.

There are many features of my heating pad that are found in ordinary electric heating pads. It has the usual pad body 10, the resistance wire 11 associated with the pad body, the electrical lead cord 12 operatively electrically connected to the resistance wiring, a prong plug 13 on the outer end of the cord, and a switch means 15 imposed in the cord line.

My invention, however, relates in general to the treatment of one or two ysides of the pad portion. Preferably I install at each side of the pad a flexible compartment holding granular or particle matter. If desired, only one side of the pad portion may have this material compartment, but in my explanation, I shall describe a compartment at each side of the base pad portion. To accomplish this I provide a cloth or like envelope 16 embracing the pad portion 10. Between 'one side of the pad portion and one side of the envelope 16, and between the other side of the pad portion and the other side of the envelope, I place the dry material 17. This granular material may be of any suitable matter, but I recommend that it be -of mineral nature, such as sand, metallic particles, mineral salts, or like. Sand is ideal, because of its cheap cost, substantial weight, and heat retaining characteristics. Certain vegetable and animal matter may also be used, such as grain, plastic particles, ground bone and like.

The arrangement of the resistance wire 11 within the pad 10 is recommended as shown in FIG. 3. The reason for this is that it permits the sewing of the two seams 19 and 20 completely through the unit as shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2. These two seams create with the side edges of the envelope and the interior pad, three chambers 21, 22 and 23 at each side of the heating pad unit, as shown in FIG. 2. These six chambers of the unit are each suitably loosely tilled with the particle matter 17 The separate closed chambers at each side of the pad unit serve several purposes besides the mere holding of the matter 17. They prevent the objectionable shifting of a majority of the matter 17 to one side of the pad unit. They maintain a more uniform thickness of the matter at each side of the pad body. They produce more possible flexibility to the pad unit so that the pad will conform to the surface being engaged by the pad. They produce even weight distribution over the pad unit area.

When my device is plugged into an electrical outlet and the switch turned on, the resistance wire will produce heat. This heat will transfer to the matter 17. Due to the mass .of the matter 17, it will successfully retain heat for an extended period of time. The weight of the matter will provide good pressure onto the surface of the user and thus the heating pad will be maintained closely `adjacent the body surface. The heat transferred from the matter 17 to the users body surface will be even, uniform and penetrating.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my body heating means without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim:

1. In an electrical heating pad, comprising in combination,

a pad base body, said pad base body including an upper layer of llexible material, a lower layer of flexible material, a means for securing said upper and lower layers together adjacent their perimeter, a circuit of resistance wire passing between said upper and lower layers and being adapted to be operatively connected to a source of electrical energy, a layer of insulating material surrounding said resistance wire, a layer of heat conductive material between said upper and lower layers,

a flexible envelope embracing said pad base body,

stitching extending through both sides of said envelope and said pad base body creating thereby a plurality of sealed compartments at each side of the unit,

and a mass of low thermal conductive particles in each of said compartments.

2. In an electrical heating pad, comprising in combination,

a pad base body, said pad base body including an upper layer of flexible material, a lower layer of flexible material, a means for securing said upper and lower layers together adjacent their perimeter, a circuit of resistance wire passing between said upper and lower layers and being adapted to be operatively connected to a source of electrical energy, a layer of insulating material surrounding said resistance wire, a layer of heat conductive material between said upper and lower layers,

a flexible envelope embracing said pad base body,

said flexible envelope including an upper and lower layer of ilexible material with respect to said embraced pad base body,

stitching first extending through the upper layer of said flexible envelope, thence through the upper layer of said pad base body, then through the lower 1ayer of said pad base body, then through the lower layer of said flexible envelope thereby creating a .plurality ofs-eal-ed compartments at the upper and lower surfaces of said pad base body,

and a mass of low thermal conductive particles in each `of said compartments.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITEDVSTATES PATENTS 515,693 2/94 Nutting 219-529 1/00 Cheney 12S-399 5/12 Kulm 219-530 9/ 19 `Charles 219-528 X 12/22 Gingras 2l9-529 5/30 Bartik 219-528 6/42 Mitchell 219-529 4/ 55 Packchanian 219--529 FOREIGN PATENTS 3/ 35 France.

RICHARD M. WOOD, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2287320 *Aug 21, 1940Jun 23, 1942Byron V MitchellVulcanizing implement
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FR782135A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3480760 *Nov 6, 1967Nov 25, 1969Fairfield Wool Co IncElectrically heated pillow
US3780262 *Jul 28, 1972Dec 18, 1973R RuddThermal bank
US4672178 *Jun 18, 1985Jun 9, 1987Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Reduced pressure heat storage element and electric heater using the same
US4846176 *Feb 24, 1987Jul 11, 1989Golden Theodore AThermal bandage
US4925743 *Apr 27, 1989May 15, 1990Nihon Food Culture Co., Ltd.Disposable body warmer and heat generating material therefor
US4954676 *Jan 14, 1988Sep 4, 1990Axti Pty Ltd.Electrically heated stuffed toy with concentrated heat dissipation
US5329096 *Aug 27, 1993Jul 12, 1994Toa Giken Co., Ltd.Heat storage mat
US5750962 *Jul 28, 1997May 12, 1998Vesture CorporationParaffin based material for storing and releasing thermal energy
US5805766 *Jul 7, 1996Sep 8, 1998Wang; Chi-TuHeat releasing bag with sodium acetate solution and electric heating element producing infrared radiation
US5849009 *Jul 24, 1995Dec 15, 1998Bernaz; GabrielFlexible probe for high frequency skin treatment
US5892202 *Sep 6, 1996Apr 6, 1999Vesture CorporationThermal storage and transport
US5913849 *Nov 4, 1996Jun 22, 1999Coloplast A/SHeat dressing
US5932129 *Jan 24, 1996Aug 3, 1999Vesture CorporationThermal retention device
US5999699 *Feb 25, 1998Dec 7, 1999Vesture CorporationThermal retention device with outer covering receiving a warmer and food to be heated
US6121578 *Mar 12, 1999Sep 19, 2000Vesture CorporationWrap heater and method for heating food product
US6215954Feb 25, 1998Apr 10, 2001Vesture CorporationThermal retention-device
US6300599Sep 19, 2000Oct 9, 2001Vesture CorporationWrap heater and method for heating food product
US6329644Oct 5, 2000Dec 11, 2001Vesture CorporationThermal retention-device
US6353208Feb 15, 2000Mar 5, 2002Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6392201Aug 16, 2000May 21, 2002Vesture CorporationCatering apparatus and method for delivering heated food product
US6433313Jul 7, 2000Aug 13, 2002Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6486443Mar 4, 2002Nov 26, 2002Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6555789Jul 22, 2002Apr 29, 2003Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6555799Mar 18, 2002Apr 29, 2003Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6629396 *May 22, 2001Oct 7, 2003Gevorg AvetisyanCell adaptable for construction of a housing structure
US6723967Oct 10, 2001Apr 20, 2004Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Heating/warming textile articles with phase change components
US6861628Nov 20, 2002Mar 1, 2005Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
US6936791Mar 15, 2000Aug 30, 2005Vesture Acquisition CorporationThermal storage and transport
US6989517Jul 27, 2004Jan 24, 2006Vesture CorporationApparatus and method for heated food delivery
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WO1997048363A1 *Jun 17, 1997Dec 24, 1997Denel Pty LtdAn infant transport unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/528, D24/206, 219/549, 219/530, 392/346, 607/96
International ClassificationH05B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationH05B2203/014, H05B3/342, H05B2203/003, H05B2203/017
European ClassificationH05B3/34B