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Publication numberUS3204836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1965
Filing dateMay 3, 1962
Priority dateMay 3, 1962
Publication numberUS 3204836 A, US 3204836A, US-A-3204836, US3204836 A, US3204836A
InventorsJoffe Edward J
Original AssigneePark Plastics Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispenser
US 3204836 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1965 E. J. Jox-FE 3,204,836

DISPENSER Filed May 3, 1962 United States Patent O 3,204,836 DISPENSER Edward Il., Jolie, Summit, NJ., assigner to Park Plastics Co., Inc., Linden, NJ., a corporation of New .Iersey Filed May 3, 1962, Ser. No. 192,193 8 Claims. (Cl. 222-545) This invention relates to a dispenser of that type which is applied to a bottle for controlling the ilow of uid lfrom the bottle. Dispensers of the particular class are being used in increasingly greater quantities due to the development of plastic containers that may be squeezed to eject various types of fluids of varying viscosity. Of course, dispensers of the type to which I refer may be used on rigid bottles or containers, as those skilled in the art will appreciate.

As a feature of my invention, I contribute a dispenser that may be readily applied to a bottle by the placing of a part of the dispenser within the neck of the bottle, after which the simple rotation of another part of the dispenser will open or close a passage for the ilow of fluid. Dispensers having the general structure I have thus outlined broadly, are well known in the art. However, so far as I am aware, no truly commercially successful dispenser has been contributed, due mainly to the fact that the control of iuid iiow is not effective.

As one feature of my dispenser that makes it extremely effective commercially, I utilize the rotation of one part, which may be called the valve or outer part, relatively to a stationary part, to open a vertical passage. This Vertical passage is normally closed merely by the application of one vertical arc or circular shaped wall to another arc or circular shaped wall. More in detail, a cylindrical wall of the outer or valve part of my dispenser rotates in bearing relation to a cylindrical wall of the stationary inner part of my dispenser, generally known in the art as the cork. The fit between these walls is such that no fluid will ow therebetween. Because the parts of my dispenser are preferably formed of polyethylene, the two walls will rotate readily relatively to one another, and this rotation is utilized to align passages in the walls so that uid may flow outwardly from the bottle or other container, through the outer or valve part of the dispenser.

Because of the bearing relationship of the two walls, it is obvious that there need not be accurate vertical alignment of the walls. Further, there need not be vertical pressures between the dispenser parts such as is required where surfaces transverse to the axis of rotation form the closure of the dispenser.

As a still further feature of my invention, the inner or cork part is readily adapted for insertion into the neck of a bottle with means for limiting the insertion. The outer or valve part of the dispenser lits partially within the cork or inner part, and lies also outwardly of the cork so as to occupy a position about the outer surface of the neck of the bottle or dispenser. As a particular further feature of my invention, the valve or outer part coacts with a surface or surfaces on the neck to hold the valve against endwise movement away from the neck. As a still further and more particular feature of the invention, it is this coaction between the outer part of the bottle neck and the valve that not only holds the outer or valve part on the bottle neck, but also retains the cork within the bottle neck, while at the same time the valve is held yieldingly against endwise movement off the neck of the bottle.

In a modified form of the invention the valve is held assembled to the cork or inner part, there being no assembly relationship between the valve and the bottle.

As a further feature of my invention, I have conceived a method as well as a means whereby a series of outer or valve parts held together on runners, may be assembled to 324,836 Patented Sept. 7, 1965 a series of inner or cork parts also held assembled on runners. Thus, the inner and outer parts are formed in molding machines through the flow of plastic material from gatings through runners to the actual parts. The relationship of the corks to the runners and the valves to the runners is such that when the runners are placed in a particular relationship, the corks may be moved into the valves to form an assembled dispenser. As a further feature of this part of the invention, the runners are formed with indexing portions that move into indeXed relationship, it naturally following that the corks and valves are then also in that particular relationship that will permit their assembly.

As a further particular feature of the invention, the means for assembling the corks and the valves also cut the valves and corks from the runners.

I have thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of my invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that my contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of my invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which my disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of my invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions as do not depart from the spirit and scope of my invention, in order to prevent the appropriation of my invention by those skilled in the art.

Referring now to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective View showing the two parts of my dispenser adapted to be assembled to the neck of a container or bottle, preferably a squeeze type plastic bottle, such as is well known in the art;

FIG. 2 is a vertical section of the parts of FIG. 1 in assembled relation;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the cork or inner part of the dispenser inverted from its position in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a section taken along line 4 4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a section taken along line 5 5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is similar to FIG. 5, showing the valve or outer part rotated relatively to the inner or cork part;

FIG. 7 shows two corks secured to runners and two valves secured to runners, the runners about to be related to one another for assembly of the corks to the valves accompanied by the severance of the runners from the valves and corks;

FIG. 8 shows the operation of a suitable tool for assembling the two parts of my dispenser; and

FIG. 9 is a modification of my invention showing a dispenser in which the valve is held assembled to the cork or inner part rather than to the bottle.

Refer-ring now more particularly to the drawings, I show best in FIG. 1 the valve or outer part of my invention designated Iby reference numeral 10, land suitably fluted at 11 `so that it may be lreadily turned by hand. The outer part 10 functions effectively as .a spout as will be seen hereafter. The inner central or cork part of the dispenser of my invention is rdesignated by reference numeral 12 i-n FIG. 1, and is formed with flutes or serrations 13 so that when inserted into a bottle neck it will not readily rotate relatively to the neck. A typical container, in this case a squeeze bottle, is designated by reference numeral 14 and is formed with a neck 15.

The cork or central part 12 inserted into the neck 15, as best shown in FIG. 2, the insertion being accomplished when the cork is positioned as shown in FIG. 1 with its 4ll'ange 16 uppermost. In FIG. 3 the flange -16 is v.shown lowermost, due to the inverted position of the central part 12. The flange 16 limits the insertion of the cork int-o the bottle, as is clearly shown in FIG. 2. Further, the ends 17 of t-he flange are used as stops 4to limit the rotation of the valve or spout part 10 relatively to the cork or central -part 12. This use of the surfaces 17 of flange 1.6 is `probably best shown in FIG. 4. There, the lug 18 of valve or 4spout 10 is shown against :one of the stop surfaces 17 of the flan-ge 16.

The cor-k -or central part 12 has .a base por-tion 20 connected by a series of ribs 21 to the outer peripheral Wall y22 Iof the cork. The purpose of the particular construction is to decrease the .amount of material -required tto make lthe cent-ral part. In fact, for this purpose, the central part or cork is equipper with a further short bore 23, best shown in FIGl 3, and in section in FIG. 2. The several spaces that are formed through the use of the lribs 21 are designated by reference numeral 24 and .are also well `shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Formed centrally of the base 20 and, therefore, centrally of the cork 12 is an upstanding cylindrical .member or post 26 cut away .as at 27. The post 26 is shown in section in FIG. 2, and is seen well in FIG. 1 where the cut away portion 27 is particularly clear. It is also `well shown in section in FIGS. 4 `and 5.

Between the opstanding lcylindrical member or post 26 and the remainder of the base portion 20 of the cork there is a circular passage opening 19 defined on one side by the circular wall 30 of cork 12, and on the other side by the outer `circular surface of the upstanding cylindrical member or post v26. Rotatably mounted within this circular passage 19 is `a sleevelike portion 31 'of cir-cular section forming an integral part of the valve Ior spout 10. The .sleevelike portion 31 is best shown in section lin FIGS. 2 yand 5 `and can also be seen in FIGS. 4 and 6. For a purpose that will appear presently, a part of `the wall -of the sleeve 31 is cutaway as .at 32, as is well seen in FIGS. 2, and 6.

yIn FIGS. 1 and 2, the neck 15 of the :bottle is shown formed with a circular ridge 40, and adapted for coaction with this ridge 40 is an inward lip 41 formed on a skirt 42 of the valve or spo-ut 10. It is obvious from lan examination of FIG. 2 that once valve or spout 10 is applied with its lip 41 under the ridge 40, t-he valve will 'be iheld yieldin-gly against removal from the neck 15 of the bottle. Application of the v-alve or spout to the neck of 4the bottle, 'as shown in FIG. 2, is made possible through the yielding construction of the spout 10, it being preferably formed of polyethylene, as was earlier outlined.

With the valve or spout in that position relatively to the Icork or central part 12 4shown in FIG. 6, the passage formed by the cut away portion 32 of the sleeve 31 will =be out of alignment with the passage 27 'of the upstanding cylindrical post member `26. Since the cylindrical wall 30 is in contact with the outer cylinder wall of the -valve sleeve 31 except at 32, it is obvious that no -uid will ow from the bottle through passage 19. Rotation of valve -or -spout 1t) to the position of FIG. 5 will align passages 27 and 32, as seen in FIGS. 2 and 5, and fluid will now flow out of the bottle. It may be well at this point to indicate that passage 19 in which ,the valve or spout sleeve 31 rotates, is in communication with the bottle 14 through the small `openings 30a, best :shown in FIG. 3. lThese passage-s are formed in the base 20 of the cork 12 `and are substantially in alignment with pass-age 1'9.

I believe it will now be clear that valve or spout 10 rotates relatively to cork or central part `12 within the limits determined by lug 18 and surfaces 117 (FIG. 4). Valve 10 is held assembled to the neck 15 of lbottle 14, and holds Ithe central part 12 within the bottle neck and with flange 1.6 ag-ainst the end surface of the bottle neck. Rotation -of valve 10 lopens `and closes a vertical passage at 27, 32 leading from passage 19.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, I show a further feature of my invention involving the molding of the parts 10 and 12 so that they may be assembled very readily, while being preferably simultaneously severed from the runners with which they are integral when taken from the molding machine. In FIG. 7, two corks 12 there illustrated are shown formed yas part of la runner 50. Those .skilled in the art will apprectiate that the plastic will flow through the runner 50 and runner strips 51 to form the corks 12. At the lower part of FIG. 7, I show two valves 10, each of which is formed yas part of a runner 52. It will lbe noted that th-rough runner portions 53 the valves are made integral with the runner 52.

Runner S0 is formed with dowel openings 55, while runner 52 is formed with dowel pins 56. The corks are so related to runner 50 and the valves 10 so related to runner 52, that when the two runners 50 and 52 are placed against one another with dowels 56 and the openings 55 aligned, the corks 12 are in position for assembly to the valves 10. This assembly can be achieved as shown in FIG. 8.

There, a dowel 56 of a runner 52 is shown within a ydowel opening 5S :of `a runner Si); A press plunger 57 is shown just .after having severed a cork 12 from its runner 5t), the cork 12 havin-g been propelled into the valve 10 which rests in a .die 5S, it being understood that the valve has also now been severed from its runner 52. A ring 59 on the die plunger 57 is shown within the valve 10 and just `under the lip 41. Obviously, the cork and valve have vbeen assembled and can both be removed quite readily through the use of a further auxiliary plunger 57a within plunger 57. The cork and valve are now available for shipping t-o the user, who will merely slip the cork 12 into 'a bottle neck while valve 10 enga-ges ridge 40 .at 41, all as shown in FIG. 2. The dispenser yassembly is then ready for operati-on.

Obviously, through the method set forth, it is possible to assemble a considerable number of dispensers automatically, while simultaneously separating the dispenser elements from` the runners with which they are formed. It will be understood further that this part of my invention is based on a very broad .and important concept.

Referring now to FIG. 9, I show another form of cork at 60 and a valve at 61. The two parts 61) and 61 function exactly as do the parts 10 and 12, except that the part 61 is here assembled at 62 to a flange 63 of the cork. In this way, the cork and valve form a complete dispenser which is assembled to a bottle by the mere placing of the cork within the neck of the bottle. While the particular modification is undoubtedly valuable, I do prefer the modification of FIG. 2, wherein the valve is retained by the bottle, and in turn helps retain the cork within the bottle neck. The assembly of FIG. 2 is more compact than that of FIG. 9 and the retention of the assembly relatively to the bottle is more effective. In both modifications, it is the simple pressure-free rotation of the valve relatively to the cork that controls dispensing.

I now claim:

1. A dispenser comprising a central or cork part having spaced inner and outer concentric curved walls dening therebetween an arc-shaped passage for the movement of fluid through the dispenser, a spout part having a sleevelike portion tted into said arc-shaped passage for rotating therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the inner and outer Walls of said passage for closing said passage while permitting rotation of said sleeve in said passage, and said sleevelike portion and a wall of said passage having each an opening adapted Vfor alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said central part to permit How of Huid through said openings.

2. A dispenser comprising a central or cork part having spaced inner and outer concentric curved walls dening therebetween an arc-shaped .passage for the movement of fluid through the dispenser, a spout part having an upper surface overlying said inner wall and a downwardly eX- tending sleevelike portion tted into said arc-shaped passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the inner and outer walls of said passage for closing said passage, said sleevelike portion having a slot opening into said passage, the inner Wall of said passage having an opening adapted for alignment with said slot in a particularly rotated position of said spout part relatively to said central part, to permit flow of fluid through said slot into the opening in said inner Wall, and said upper surface of said spout part having an opening for communicating with said opening in said inner Wall.

3. A dispenser` comprising a central or cork part having a central upstanding cylindrical post, a curved wall formed on said central part concentrically with said post and spaced therefrom to define with said post an arcshaped passage for the movement of fluid through the dispenser, a valve or spout part having a sleevelike portion fitted into said arc-shaped passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer Walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the said curved wall of said passage and the outer surface of said post for closing said passage, and said sleevelike portion and the outer surface of said post having openings adapted for alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said post to permit flow of fluid into said opening in said post.

4. A dispenser comprising a central part having a central or cork upstanding cylindrical post, a circular wall concentric with said post and spaced from said post to define with said post a circular passage for the movement of fluid, a valve or spout part having an upper surface juxtaposed to the upper end of said post, a sleevelike portion extending from said upper surface and fitted into said passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the outer surface of the post and the said circular wall of said passage for closing said passage, said sleevelike portion and the outer surface of said post having openings adapted for alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said post to permit ow of fluid into said post, and said upper surface of said spout part having an opening communicating with the opening of said post.

5. A dispenser attachment for a dispensing bottle cornprising a cork or central part adapted to be inserted and held in the neck of said dispenser bottle in the manner of a cork or other stopper, said central part having spaced inner and outer curved walls defining therebetween an arcshaped passage for the movement of fluid through the dispenser, a valve or spout part having a sleevelike portion fitted into said arc-shaped passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the inner and outer walls of said passage for closing said passage, said sleevelike portion and a wall of said passage having each an opening adapted for alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said central part to permit flow of fluid, said spout having also a further outer opening for the outward flow of fluid, and said spout part having an outer flange for encompassing the neck of the bottle and formed with a retaining surface cooperable with a retaining portion on the outer surface of said neck.

6. A dispenser attachment for a dispensing bottle comprising a cork or central part adapted to be inserted and held in the neck of said dispenser bottle in the manner of a cork or stopper, means integral with said central part impinging on the upper end of said neck to limit insertion of said central part into said neck, said central part having ia central upstanding cylindrical post, a curved wall formed on said central part concentrically with said post and spaced therefrom to define with said post an arcshaped passage for the movement of fluid through the dispenser, a valve or spout part having a sleevelike portion fitted into said arc-shaped passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the said outer wall of said passage and the outer surface of said post for closing said passage, said sleevelike portion and the outer surface of said post having each an opening adapted for alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said post to permit flow of fluid into said opening in said post, and said spout part having an outer flange for encompassing the said bottle neck and formed with a retaining surface cooperable with a retaining portion on the outer surface of .said bottle neck.

7. A dispensing bottle having a neck, a cork or central part adapted to be inserted and held in said neck in the manner of a cork or stopper, said central part having a central upstanding cylindrical post, a circular wall on said central part concentric with said post and spaced from said post to define with said post a circular passage for the movement of fluid, a valve or spout part having an upper surface juxtaposed to the upper end of said post, a sleevelike portion extending from said upper surface and fitted into said passage for rotation therein with the inner and outer walls of said sleevelike portion fitting against the surface of the post and the said circular wall of said passage for closing said passage, said sleevelike portion and the outer surface of said post having openings adapted for alignment in a particular rotated position of said spout part relatively to said post to permit flow of fluid into said post, said upper surface of said spout part having an opening communicating with the opening of said post, said spout part having an outer flange encompassing said neck and formed with a retaining surface, and a retaining portion on the outer surface of said dispenser neck cooperable With said retaining surface.

8. In a combination of claim 4, said spout part having an outer flange for encompassing the neck of the bottle and formed with a retaining surface cooperable with a retaining portion on the outer surface of said neck.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,179,423 1 l/ 39 Pari 222-546 2,421,201 5/47 Hallock ISI-41.71 2,558,026 6/51 Wilson 18-55 2,584,916 2/52 Poux 18-55 2,764,453 9/ 56 Robb et al 222-548 X 2,891,304 6/59 Colvin 29-193.5 2,931,543 4/ 60 Thomas 222-546 2,944,330 7/ 60 SWick 29-193.5 3,118,578 1/64 Collins 222-548 RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner. LOUIS I. DEMBO, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3295730 *May 27, 1965Jan 3, 1967Moran James GRotary flow control closure for a container
US3325065 *Oct 20, 1965Jun 13, 1967Continental Can CoDispensing container and closure having relatively rotatable inner and outer caps with rotation limiting means
US3325066 *Oct 22, 1965Jun 13, 1967Continental Can CoDispensing container having a rotary closure cap
US3386633 *Apr 20, 1966Jun 4, 1968John A. EricsonClosure for a bottom pour metallurgical ladle
US3690521 *May 28, 1971Sep 12, 1972Middleton Edward BContainer including a rotatable spherical valve with ring driver gear teeth
US3967765 *Sep 30, 1974Jul 6, 1976Leeds And MicallefMultiple purpose nozzle
US4020982 *Oct 10, 1975May 3, 1977Leeds And MicallefRotary shut-off nozzle
US4690304 *Dec 5, 1985Sep 1, 1987Simone MorelObturating device for tubes, flasks and other containers, the opening and closing of which are controlled through rotation
US4754899 *Feb 3, 1987Jul 5, 1988Gene StullTwist cap having adjustable flow rate
US4772152 *Jul 29, 1986Sep 20, 1988Nomix Manufacturing Co. LimitedConnector for conveying fluid
US4860955 *Jan 27, 1989Aug 29, 1989Nomix Manufacturing Co. LmitedSpraying equipment with rotatable cap for adjusting flowrate
US4865253 *Jul 20, 1988Sep 12, 1989Nomix Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Spraying equipment
US4905902 *Oct 15, 1987Mar 6, 1990Nomix Manufacturing Company LimitedSpraying equipment
US4964548 *Oct 27, 1989Oct 23, 1990Mccormick & Company, Inc.Dispensing closure having an interior sealing sleeve, a threaded sleeve engaging a threaded tube, and stop blocks limiting twisting of the closure cap
US5161718 *Apr 11, 1991Nov 10, 1992L'orealAssembly for dispensing at least one liquid product or a product in the form of a cream
US5325999 *Sep 17, 1993Jul 5, 1994L'orealAssembly for dispensing at least one liquid product or a product in the form of a cream
US5833121 *Jul 29, 1996Nov 10, 1998L'orealPackaging and dispensing device
US5938086 *Nov 5, 1998Aug 17, 1999Aptargroup, Inc.Container and closure with non-rising rotatable housing, dispensing valve, and separate releasable internal shipping seal
US6095382 *Sep 21, 1998Aug 1, 2000Aptargroup, Inc.Container and closure with dispensing valve and separate releasable internal shipping seal
US6334556 *Sep 20, 1999Jan 1, 2002Rexam SofabCap for sealing a liquid product container
US7125187 *Dec 26, 2002Oct 24, 2006L'Oréal, S.A.Closure system for a container
US8251263Mar 19, 2009Aug 28, 2012Mary Kay Inc.Container caps and systems
US8561857Jul 25, 2012Oct 22, 2013Mark Kay Inc.Container caps and systems
USRE38328Nov 13, 2000Nov 25, 2003L'orealPackaging and dispensing device
DE2644786A1 *Oct 4, 1976Apr 21, 1977Leeds & MicallefAusgabeduese
EP0758615A1 *Aug 8, 1996Feb 19, 1997L'orealPackaging and dispensing device
WO2000017062A1 *Sep 20, 1999Mar 30, 2000Bougamont Jean LouisCap for sealing a liquid product container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/545, 222/548
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/26
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/263
European ClassificationB65D47/26D2