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Publication numberUS3206209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1965
Filing dateFeb 3, 1964
Priority dateFeb 3, 1964
Publication numberUS 3206209 A, US 3206209A, US-A-3206209, US3206209 A, US3206209A
InventorsFarrah Charles D
Original AssigneeFarrah Charles D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pivoted surface projectile game apparatus
US 3206209 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 14, 1965 C, D, FRRAH 3,206,209

PIVOTED SURFACE PROJECTILE GAME APPARATUS Filed Feb. 3, 1964 United States Patent O 3,206,209 PIVOTED SURFACE PROJECTILE GAME APPARATUS Charles D. Farrah, Schamburg, Ill. (49 Wellesley Lane, Roselle, Ill.) Filed Feb. 3, 1964, Ser. No. 341,886 3 Claims. (Cl. 273-110) 'from offense to defense between the participants during the continuous action.

It is therefore a general object of this invention to provide a new and improved game apparatus.

It is a primary object of this invention to provide a y newand improved game lapparatus which provides continuous competitive action between two contestants.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved game apparatus which may be played on relatively equal terms between children of very tender years and adult participants.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a new and improved game apparatus for providing competition of a continuous nature between contestants of diverse ages and affording instantaneous change of competitive posture of either contestant from offensive to defensive.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved game apparatus for providing continuous competitive action between contestants of diverse ages which is simple to produce and economical to manufacture.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a new and improved game apparatus for providing continuous competitive action between contestants of diverse ages wherein each contestant simultaneously and continuously seeks to offensively occupy a common goal while at the same time retaining the capability to block the opposers occupation of this common goal.

Other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is a side elevational View of the game of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the game of this invention;

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view of the game of this invention showing different positions to which the arms may be manipulated;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of the game of this invention showing the arms manipulated so that the spools oppose each other and block the entry of the opposite spool into the goal; and

FIGURE 5 is an end elevational view of the game of this invention.

Referring now to the drawings, in FIGURE 1 there is shown the game apparatus 10 of this invention. Included in the apparatus is a generally tlat elongate base 12 bearing generally sickle-shaped, inwardly facing, opposed arms 14 and 14a in spaced relation above the base on upwardly projecting posts 16 and 16a, respectively. Each post 16 and 16a is received in a slot (not shown) in the underside of the arms 14 and 14a, respectively, and transversely extending pins 18 and 18a, respectively, ex-

3,206,209 Patented Sept. 14, 1965 ICC tend through each arm and each post to mount the arms for pivotal movement relative to the posts.

The game apparatus further includes projectiles or spools 20 and 20a for each arm 14 and 14a, respectively. The spools straddle the arms and are freely rollable relative to the arms so that suitable manipulation of the arms can impart a desired trajectory to the spools. A goal or keeper 22 projects upwardly from the base between the two arms 14 and 14a and is notched at 23 for receiving one of the spools.

Each arm 14 and 14a is provided with arcuate crescentshaped flat track portions 24 and 24a, respectively, and at outwardly extending handles 26 and 26a, respectively. Each track portion terminates in upwardly inclined pointed front flipping ends 27 and 27a, respectively, while the lopposite end of each track junctures with the handles 26 and 26a in upturned rear limit portions 28 and 28a, respectively.

Each spool- 20 and 20a includes tubular shafts 29 and 29a, respectively, with Wheel-like discs 30 and 30a mounted at either end of each shaft 29 and 29a, respectively, in conventional spool-like fashion. The shaft portions 29 and 29a are of sutlicient width so thatrthe spools may freely straddle the track portion of the arms with the discs of the spools spaced free kof the sides of the arms to permit free rolling movement of the spools between the rear limit portion and the front dipping portion of the tracks of each arm.

The object of the game is to flip one of the spools into the goal so that the spool shaft will become lodged in the notched portion of the goal and retain the spool in the goal. To this end, each player can manipulate the pivotally mounted arms to build up momentum of the spool to flip the spool into the proper trajectory, so that the spool, under the inuence of gravity, will lodge on the goal 22. In FIGURE 3, the arms are shown in their opposite extreme positions of manipulation utilized in building up momentum of the spool.

As shown in FIGURE 4, each player may not only offensively seek the common goal, but he may also block the opposing players attempt to flip the spool into the goal. The radius of the discs 30 and 30a are of such dimension so that when one spool is on the tip of its associated arm, the periphery of the disc of the spool will prevent the entry of the opposite spool into the goal.

The movement utilized to obtain the momentum for llipping the spool into the goal is a simple rocking movement which is imparted to the pivotally mounted arms. Such a movement is within the coordination capacity of a very young child. The feel of the proper amount of rocking force to be applied to the arms to impart the desired movement to the spool may be quickly and easily learned so that an extremely young child may participate in this competitive game with adults on relatively equal terms.

The game apparatus of this invention provides a truly competitive continuous action game capable of being played between participants of diverse ages and affording the possibility of instantaneous change of competitive posture from offensive to defensive. There is but one goal which both participants are seeking to obtain and each participant may olfensively seek this goal, as Well as defensively prevent the opposing contestant from attaining the goal. The game apparatus is of very simple construction and the base, upstanding post and goal may be molded in one piece of a suitable plastic. The two arms and two spools, as Well as the two pivot pins are identical members so that only four simple pieces need be fabricated and the only assembly step required is to pivotally mount the arms to the post by means of the pivot pin. Thus the game apparatus of this invention may be simply and economically manufactured and provide a source of competitive amusement to contestants of different age groups.

While I have shown and described certain embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modications. Changes, therefore, in

' the construction and arrangement may be made Without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention as set out in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A competitive continuous action game apparatus, comprising: a base; a pair of track members pivoted on the base in mutual opposition to each other for rocking manipulation; projectile means for each track member, said projectile means comprising a spool having a shaft and upright discs at either end of the shaft, said spools straddling each track member with the disc-like ends overhanging the track members to thereby adapt said spool to roll relative to said track members and build up momentum in response to the rocking manipulation of each pivoted track member; a goal spaced from each track member, said goal having a spool receiving portion of a size and shape to receive the shaft of each spool when the .spool has been ipped into a proper trajectory under the spool disc so that when the spools are positioned upon each end of the track member and positioned adjacent the goal,

one spool may prevent the entry of the other spool on to the goal.

2. The game apparatus of claim 1 wherein the goal is substantially centrally disposed between the track members.

3. A competitive continuous action game apparatus, comprising: a base; a pair of track members, each having an arcuate track surface, said track members pivoted to the base for manual rocking manipulation; a spool for each track member, said spool having a shaft of a length greater than the width of the track members and enlarged ends mounted at each end of the shaft so that when the spools are mounted on the track members with the shafts generally transverse to the track members the enlarged ends overhang the track members to thereby mount the spool on the track members for free rolling movement relative thereto; and only a single goal means positioned equidistant between the track members and having notch means open at its ends of va size for receiving the shaft of only one of said spools when that spool has been iiipped into a proper trajectory under the combined inuence of gravity and skillful manipulation of its track member. 4

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 503,022 8/93 Whitburn. 3,093,377 6/63l Irwin 273-109 3,108,809 10/63 Peterson 273-11() RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US503022 *Apr 26, 1893Aug 8, 1893 Daniel whitburn
US3093377 *Sep 7, 1961Jun 11, 1963Irwin William RSkill toys
US3108809 *Jun 1, 1962Oct 29, 1963Peter A PetersonSpinning toy game device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4120501 *Sep 29, 1977Oct 17, 1978Roger Lee AthertonInclined track ball and dice game
US6638134 *Jan 18, 2002Oct 28, 2003Peter L. HewittVertical boarding toy having a thin flat-faced track jumping spinner
US7946903 *May 4, 2007May 24, 2011Mattel, Inc.Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US8465339May 24, 2011Jun 18, 2013Mattel, Inc.Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20080171491 *May 4, 2007Jul 17, 2008David SheltmanWheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20110223829 *Sep 15, 2011Mattel, Inc.Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/355, 273/120.00R, 273/357
International ClassificationA63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/00
European ClassificationA63F9/00