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Publication numberUS3206818 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1965
Filing dateMar 15, 1963
Priority dateMar 15, 1963
Publication numberUS 3206818 A, US 3206818A, US-A-3206818, US3206818 A, US3206818A
InventorsKnowlton Edward A
Original AssigneeUnited Carr Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snap fastener assembly and decorative part for the same
US 3206818 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1965 E. A. KNOWLTON 3,206,318

SNAP FASTENER ASSEMBLY AND DECORATIVE PART FOR THE SAME Filed March 15, 1963 Inveni'oz' Edward .H. Knowlion,

United States Patent 3,206,818 SNAP FASTENER ASSEMBLY AND DECORATIVE PART FOR THE SAME Edward A. Knowlton, Winchester, Mass., assignor to United-Carr Incorporated, a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 15, 1963, Ser. No. 265,513 Z'Claims. (Cl. 24-208) This invention is directed to a fastener assembly and more particularly to an assembly that includes a supporting material having a snap fastener socket or stud part heat sealed to an undersurface thereof and a decorative part also heat sealed to the uppersurface of the support and in alignment with the snap fastener part, and also the decorative part, per se.

An object ,of the invention is to provide a snap fastener installation which includes a decorative part heat sealed to a support over a snap fastener member and a decorative part having a coating of heat sealable plastic material such as vinyl which is adapted to be bonded by dielectric heat sealing without distorting the decorative part.

Another object of the invention is to provide a decorative part heat sealable to a supporting material and for use in conjunction with or without a snap fastener part also heat sealed to the supporting material.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a portion of an article .of commerce such as the front opening of a plastic raincoat, showing the decorative part of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged section taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged plan view of an improved decorative part;

FIG. 4 is an edge view of the part shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a section of the decorative part showing the bottom surface with a recess therein;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 showing the primer coating applied to the undersurface of the decorative part;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 with the heat sealable material held in place by the primer material;

FIG. 8 is an edge view of a modified form of decorative part, without the recess in the bottom of the decorative part; and

FIG. 9 is a section .of an installation of the decorative part shown in FIG. 8 attached to a supporting material.

Heat sealing of buttons or snap fastener studs or snap fastener sockets to a support is known to be old in the art. However, the idea of heat sealing a decorative part to a support over a snap fastener stud .or socket is be lieved to be new, especially where it is desirable to dress up an article of commerce, such as a vinyl raincoat, by the use of a fancy so-called mother-of-pearl part of plastic or other suitable material such as now used in the trade with metal snap fasteners.

The invention selected for illustration and description relates to an assembly, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, which includes a support having overlapping portions 1 and 2 to provide an opening such as the front opening of a raincoat. The raincoat material may be plastic or cloth and a plastic snap fastener stud 3 is heat sealed to the upper face of the portion 2, as shown in FIG. 2.

A plastic snap fastener socket 4, is heat sealed to the underside of the overlapping portion 1 and the improved decorative part 5 is heat sealed to the upper exposed surface of the portion 1. The parts 4 and 5 may be heat sealed to the portion 1 as a single operation by suitable heat sealing equipment or each may be sealed by a separate operation according to the desires of the manufacturer of the garment.

A decorative part 5 shown in FIGS. 1-7 is formed of polyester plastic material and usually has the appearance of a salt or fresh water pearl. This part 5 has a recess ice 6 in the bottom surface (FIG. 5) and preferably a coating of bonding material 7 (preferably plastisol primer material) is applied over the bottom surface of the part 5 including the surface in the recess 6 as shown in FIG. 6. Thereafter a vinyl plastisol heat sealable material 8 is applied to the underside of the part 5 to fill the recess and cover the bonding material and also have.

a shape and thickness about as shown in FIG. 7. It has been found that an amount of plastisol material 8 thicker than just a plain thin coat is desirable in some instances for proper heat sealing of the part to a support. The problem that has been solved by this invention is the provision of a decorative part of plastic or other suitable material that may be heat sealed in assembly with a snap fastener part to a suitable supporting material. This is accomplished because the difference in the properties of the vinyl, and the polyester pearl decorative part is such that the vinyl material will melt and heat seal to the support, while the decorative part has a lower dielectric loss factor and therefore does not soften enough to become misshaped.

Because the pearl does not function as an electrode the way a metallic decorative part does the distance between the two electrodes of the attaching equipment is much greater, and hence more power (energy/time) is required. Power required to heat the vinyl to a certain temperature in a certain time varies directly as the square of the voltage and inversely as the square of the distance between electrodes.

A decorative part 9, as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, is the same as shown in FIG. 7 except that the recess 6 has been eliminated and a plastisol coating 10 is applied over a coat of primer 11 on the bottom surface thereof. This construction is all that may be necessary in some installations and with some materials.

The decorative parts 5 or 9 may be heat sealed to a supporting material 12 as shown in FIG. 9 to provide a decoration without being associated with a snap fastener member.

A method of applying the bonding material and the vinyl plastisol is to apply the bonding material by spraying, brushing, etc., drying the bonding material, and then applying the vinyl plastisol by dropping a measured amount onto the dried bonding material, and thereafter curing by heat, as in a hot air oven; then, the decorative part is ready for use at any future time.

In the case of the vinyl-backed decorative part described above, the trick is to heat the vinyl without too much heating of the body of the decorative part. In this case too much is any temperature which alters the appearance of the decorative part 5. Experiments have shown that the decorative part 5 reached a term perature of about ISO-200 F. while fusion temperature .of the vinyl material 8 is about 350 F. An example of a workable combination is the difference of physical properties of two materials such as polyester decorative part 5 and soft vinyl 8 because the polyester material has a lower dielectric loss factor than the vinyl material. The loss factor describes the amount .of electrical energy which at very high frequencies used in high frequency electric heat sealing devices, is absorbed in the form of heat by the normally non-conductive plastic materials.

While there have been illustrated and described improved embodiments of the invention it should be understood that the invention is best defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A fastener assembly comprising, in combination, a supporting material to which a part may be heat sealed, a decorative part located at one side of the support and heat sealed thereto by a heat sealable material carried at an underside of said decorative part, a snap fastener member heat sealed to the opposite side of said support in alignment with, and substantially coextensive with, the decorative part, and a primer material between the decorative part and the heat sealable material to bond the heat sealable material in place.

2. A fastener assembly comprising in combination a supporting material to which a part may be heat sealed, a decorative part located at one side of said supporting material and heat sealed thereto by a heat sealable material carried at the underside of said decorative part, and a snap fastener member heat sealed to the opposite side of said support in alignment with the decorative part, said decorative part being of a material having an inherent lower dielectric loss factor than the heat sealable material at the underside thereof to prevent distortion of the decorative part during the heat sealing operation.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,020,007 11/35 Wagman 156310 X 2,745,159 5/56 Jones 24213 2,956,915 10/60 Korn et a1. 161265 X FOREIGN PATENTS 995,680 8/51 France.

DONLEY J. STOCKING, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2020007 *Feb 14, 1934Nov 5, 1935Wagman Morris HOrnamentation and method for the same
US2745159 *Mar 30, 1951May 15, 1956United Carr Fastener CorpHeat sealable plastic fastener and assembly
US2956915 *Feb 17, 1955Oct 18, 1960Kaye Tex Mfg CorpThermoplastic laminate for use in lining storage tanks
FR995680A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3416200 *Mar 22, 1967Dec 17, 1968Scovill Manufacturing CoPermanently locking snap fastener
US3760461 *Feb 23, 1972Sep 25, 1973J WrightTowel attachment
US4265002 *Aug 13, 1979May 5, 1981Hosken James CMagnetic fastening means
US4580320 *Mar 26, 1984Apr 8, 1986Scovill Japan Kabushiki KaishaButton having plastic resin head
US4592118 *Nov 18, 1983Jun 3, 1986Barnhart Industries, Inc.Fasteners for apparel and methods of manufacturing them
US4606079 *Oct 16, 1985Aug 19, 1986Barnhart Industries, Inc.Fasteners for apparel and methods of manufacturing them
US4633565 *Oct 16, 1985Jan 6, 1987Barnhart Industries, Inc.Fasteners for apparel and methods of manufacturing them
US4735753 *Jul 28, 1986Apr 5, 1988Ackermann Walter TMethod of making a fastener
US4783723 *Feb 25, 1987Nov 8, 1988Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Collectors heat sealed to vulcanized rubber gasket without adhesive
US4841706 *Nov 18, 1987Jun 27, 1989Carlisle CorporationNon-penetrating fastener for affixing elastomeric sheeting to a roof
US5441095 *Jan 10, 1994Aug 15, 1995Trethewey; Brig E. A.Detachably mounted windshield screen
US5797643 *Jan 19, 1996Aug 25, 1998Fia Inc.Fastening a fabric cover to a vehicle surface
US6314621 *Jan 25, 2000Nov 13, 2001Morito Co., Ltd.Tape-mounted fastener and a manufacturing method thereof
US7203999 *Aug 20, 2002Apr 17, 2007Bagot Valerie PButton protector for laundering, dry-cleaning and ironing operations
USRE32500 *Aug 15, 1986Sep 15, 1987Scovill Japan Kabushiki KaishaButton having plastic resin head
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/693, 24/114.6, 24/114.4
International ClassificationA44B1/00, A44B17/00, A44B1/28
Cooperative ClassificationA44B17/0029, A44B1/28
European ClassificationA44B17/00F, A44B1/28