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Publication numberUS3206885 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1965
Filing dateOct 1, 1963
Priority dateOct 1, 1963
Publication numberUS 3206885 A, US 3206885A, US-A-3206885, US3206885 A, US3206885A
InventorsJethro Dye Garnett
Original AssigneeJethro Dye Garnett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Firearm with metal bearing member and plastic material between receiver and stock
US 3206885 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1965 3,206,885

G. J. DYE FIREARM WITH METAL BEARING MEMBER AND PLASTIC MATERIAL BETWEEN RECEIVER AND STOCK Filed Oct. 1, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR G. J Dye Sept. 21, 1965 G. J. DYE

FIREARM WITH METAL BEARING MEMBER AND PLASTIC MATERIAL BETWEEN RECEIVER AND STOCK 2 Sheets-Shget 2 Filed 001;. 1, 1963 INVENTOR 6. J Dye Ill United States Patent 3,206,885 FIREARM WITH METAL BEARING MEMBER AND PLASTIC MATERIAL BETWEEN RECEIV- ER AND STOCK Garnett Jethro Dye, 950 Veltre Circle SW., Atlanta, Ga. Filed Oct. 1, 1963, Ser. No. 312,907 4 Claims. (CI. 42-75) This invention generally relates to a concept for securing a metallic firearm mechanism to a wooden stock.

On most factory-made rifles, in order to minimize the cost of production, the wooden stock is routed out by a machine so that it can receive the metallic firearm mechanism (usually consisting of a bolt, trigger and barrel). It is not practical to try to machine the wooden stock to such an extent that it will make a perfect fit with the intricate shape of the metallic firearm mechanism. Usually several simple surfaces are chosen as points of bearing and an effort made to get good contact with these points. The degree of perfection achieved is to a great extent dependent on the quality of wood because the quality determines the finish that may be achieved. Even if a good finish is achieved and a good hearing or fit is effected initially, the wood is subjected to subsequent warpage conditions which can alter the fit. In addition, shrinkage and expansion resulting from humidity variations can produce changes in the tightness of the fit. In some cases if a relatively soft and readily compressible wood for the stock it will result in a varying fit between the firearm mechanism and the stock depending upon the amount that the attaching screws are tightened.

All of these above faults are reduced in custom made guns where great care is taken particularly in the selection of the wood to see that it is well seasoned, stable and of good density so that a good finish and fit may be obtained. With custom made guns the stock is cut out not by machine but by hand with small chisels so that every practical point of the metallic firearm mechanism bears evenly and smoothly against a matching part of the wooden stock. During this process the fit is constantly checked with Prussian blue until a perfect fit is achieved. Considerably improved accuracy does result, but such custom fitting is obviously very expensive and even so the fit is still subject to some change as a result of warpage, swelling, or shrinking.

In recent years .a new technique has been developed which is economical and which achieves a reasonably good fit. This technique consists of cutting away the wood of the stock until clearance is achieved at all locations where hearing or fit is desired, and then the areas around these locations are filled with an excess of certain plastics (e.g. epoxy resins, or fiber glass, etc.). The metallic firearm mechanism is pressed into the soft plastic to form a sort of mold, and the plastic allowed to harden. The firearm mechanism is then removed. The result is a molded fit of the parts which is good and it may readily be disassembled and re-assembled. However, swelling, warping or shrinking of the wood can still cause changes in the point of impact from day today.

Greater accuracy could be achieved by milling slots and/or drilling holes in the metallic firearm mechanism and then using a plastic that would adhere to the metal parts as well as fill in through the holes and slots to make a permanent bond of the metallic firearm mechanism to the wood stock. However, this would not be practical because the various parts could not be disassembled for cleaning and repair.

Molded plastic stocks have also been provided and in some cases relatively a close fitting may be obtained. However, wooden stocks are greatly preferred due to their feel, strength and beauty. Thus, the retention of "ice a wood stock is greatly desired if an accurate fitting can be achieved.

It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a fitting which will enable the stock to accurately receive and hold a metallic firearm mechanism in the same position each time these parts are assembled.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fitting which will not allow the metallic firearm mechanism to shift with respect to the stock, thereby insuring uniformity of position so that inaccuracy from shot to shot will not occur through the fault of the firearm, but only through the fault of the rifleman.

A further object of the invention is to obivate the effects of varying atmospheric conditions on the position of the metallic firearm mechanism in the stock.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fitting which will allow metallic firearm mechanisms and stocks to be interchanged without changing the point of impact of the metallic firearm mechanism or the stock.

These as well as other objects and advantages will be readily apparent after studying the detailed description which follows in conjunction with the drawings. However, before explaining the present invention in detail it should be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the specific details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring now to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an exploded perspective view of a portion of a rifle which includes the elements of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a partially cut-away perspective view of a metal bearing member secured in a wooden stock;

FIGURE 3 is a view along 33 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 4 is a front view of the barrel connector portion of the bolt action assembly showing the front lug;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary and partially cut away view of the rear end of the bolt action assembly including the rear lug;

FIGURE 6 is a view along 66 of FIGURE 5.

Considered from one aspect, the present invention involves a firearm comprising:

(a) a barrel,

(b) a receiver attached rearwardly of said barrel,

(c) said receiver including at least one lug which is disposed transversely to the axis of said barrel,

(d) said receiver including at least one lug which is disposed parallel to the axis of said barrel,

(e) a wooden stock,

(f) a metal bearing member rigidly secured to said wooden stock by a mass of plastic material,

(g) said metal bearing member having grooves that are positioned and aligned so as to receive said lugs on said receiver, and

(h) means to secure said lugs and grooves together in a tight fitting relationship.

As is shown in FIGURE 1, a barrel 30 is provided which is threaded so that it can be attached to the threaded end 25 of the barrel connector portion 11 of receiver 10. The receiver 10 of the firearm is provided with at least one lug 15 which is disposed transversely to the axis of the barrel 30. The receiver 10 is also provided with at least one lug 12 which is disposed parallel to the axis of said barrel.

In FIGURES 3 and 4 the location of the front lug 15 on the bottom of the barrel connector portion 11 is shown in greater detail. A threaded hole 28 is shown which i) is adapted to receive the bolt 17 of FIGURE 1. The bottom portion of the lug 15 is seen to be somewhat V- shaped.

FIGURES and 6 show the location of a rear lug 12 in relation to the bottom rear portion of the receiver. A threaded hole 29 is adapted to receive the bolt 20 (see FIGURE 1).

Lugs 12 and 15 are preferably integrally formed with the receiver but may be welded, brazed or otherwise securely attached thereto.

In FIGURES 1 and 2 the wooden stock 18 is clearly shown. The stock can be made from any desired wood and is appropriately routed or cut to accommodate a trigger housing 8 and the metal bearing member 14 which will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

The metal bearing member 14 has two downwardly extending legs ,19a and 1% which extending parallel to the axis of the gun, and the wooden stock 18 must of course be cut out sufficiently to receive these legs. Legs 19a and 1% are preferably provided with a plurality of openings 24. The upper surface of the metal bearing member 14 preferably has an opening 26 to accommodate the trigger housing 8. The upper surface of the metal bearing member 14 also is provided with several grooves, as for example transverse groove 16 and longitudinal groove 13, said grooves being somewhat V- shaped. Grooves 13 and 16 are preferably provided with threaded holes 34 and 32 respectively, but these threaded holes could also be spaced laterally of the grooves.

The trigger housing 8 is secured to the bottom of wooden stock 18 by means of screws 21 and 22. The upper portion 7 of the trigger housing 8 extends up into the opening 26 of the metal bearing member 14. A trigger guard 8 is also shown.

After the trigger housing has been inserted in place in the stock, a quantity of either a thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic material 23 is placed in the routed out portion of the wooden gun stock. A preferred plastic material would be an epoxy resin or an equivalent material. Fiber glass may be added for reinforcement. It is preferred that the plastic material be relatively unaffected by ordinary changes in atmospheric conditions and have the ability to effect a good bond to both metal and wood.

When the introduction of the plastic material has been completed, the metal bearing member 14 is put into position and the plastic material permitted to set or harden so that the metal bearing member is securely embedded in the plastic. The plastic material, since it adheres both to the wood of the stock and to the metal of the metal bearing member, will effectively lock these two components into a unitary whole. When the wooden stock is cut out or routed out, such cutting out can be carried out so that the resulting channels and cavities in the Wooden stock will help insure that the plastic cannot come loose from the wooden stock once the plastic has set. It is preferred that the metal bearing member 14 be positioned so that it does not directly contact the wooden portion of the stock so that the adhesive plastic can enter at every point and thereby achieve maximum adhesion. The openings 24 in the legs 19a and 1% help insure the permanent maintenance of the position of the metal bearing member in the settable plastic material by the filling in of the space in openings 24 with the plastic material.

When the metal bearing member 14 has been embedded in the plastic as described above, it in effect forms a very stable and essentially unvariable platform, bearing or impact surface which is adapted to receive the bolt action assembly 10. Lugs 15 and 12 mate securely into grooves 16 and 13 respectively and are held there tightly by means of bolts 17 and respectively. Forward, backward and lateral movement is thus prevented.

It should be noted that the grooves and lugs might be positioned at various other angles to one another so long as the backward, forward and lateral movement is effectively restrained. While two lug and groove connections are preferable, when conditions require, additional lug and groove seatings may be provided. Also, the front lug could be parallel to the axis of the barrel and the back lug could be transverse to the axis of the barrel.

While the invention is illustrated on a bolt action rifle the invention may be suitably applied to other firearms.

When the rifle is fired the recoil is transferred from the metallic firearm assembly to the wooden stock through the fittings described above. In particular, any component of recoil force either forwardly or backwardly will cause the lug 15 to bear against the edges of groove 16. Thus, any movement or force will be uniform with each shot due to the uniform position of the parts and the rigidity of their connection. If a new receiver is placed in the rifle the same bearing surface will be contacted. Since these surfaces are metal there will be only the very slightest, if any, difference in the behavior of interchanged parts.

When the rifle is fired, any recoil action which might cause lateral force on the receiver will cause the lug 12 to bear against the side of groove 13. Any movement is immediately restricted. This action will be uniform with each shot. Thus, after the operator becomes accustomed to the rifle he need only obtain uniformity in his firing motions to obtain accurate results.

The invention will accommodate other desirable features commonly used in target weapons. In some cases, particularly with heavy barrels, the barrels are permitted to free float or have clearance for their entire length so that they may vibrate freely. The theory is apparently that if the barrel is not restrained by some outside force it will vibrate exactly the same for each shot. Therefore, the target rifle will fire with the same accuracy with each shot. In the present invention the barrel may float freely or it may be secured and the advantages of the invention may be reaped.

Whereas the stock is frequently referred to as a wooden stock in the foregoing specification and the claims which follow, it will be understood that stocks made of plastic or any other material are obvious equivalents. Also, whereas V-lugs are described as being the attaching means between the metal bearing member and the receiver no invention would be involved in using mating ball sockets instead of V-shaped lugs.

In conclusion, while the foregoing specification and drawing describe the construction, operation and use of one preferred embodiment of the instant invention, it is to be understood that I do not intend to limit myself to the precise constructions and arrangements herein disclosed, since the various details of construction, form and arrangement may obviously be varied to a considerable extent by anyone skilled in the art without really departing from the basic principles and novel teachings of this invention and without sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention, and accordingly it is intended to encompass all changes, variations, modifications and equivalents falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A firearm comprising in combination:

(a) a barrel,

(b) a receiver attached rearwardly of said barrel,

(c) said receiver including at least one lug which is disposed transversely to the axis of said barrel,

(d) said receiver including at least one lug which is disposed parallel to the axis of said barrel,

(e) a wooden stock,

(f) a metal bearing member rigidly secured to said wooden stock by a mass of plastic material,

(g) said metal bearing member having grooves that are positioned and aligned so as to receive said lugs on said receiver, and

5 6 (h) means to secure said lugs and grooves together References Cited by the Examiner in a tight fitting relationship. 2. A firearm according to claim 1 wherein said plastic UNITED STATES PATENTS material comprises an epoxy resin. 2,967,368 1/61 Williams 42-75.1

3. A firearm according to claim 1 wherein said plastic material includes fiber glass.

4. A firearm according to claim 1 wherein threaded BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT. Primary Examiner. bolts connect said aligned grooves and lugs together.

5 2,975,540 3/61 Lewis 42-75.3

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Classifications
U.S. Classification42/75.3
International ClassificationF41C23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41C23/00
European ClassificationF41C23/00