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Publication numberUS3206891 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1965
Filing dateJun 17, 1963
Priority dateJun 17, 1963
Publication numberUS 3206891 A, US 3206891A, US-A-3206891, US3206891 A, US3206891A
InventorsAdamski Richard R
Original AssigneeAdamski Richard R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetically actuated toy vehicle and roadbed with coil
US 3206891 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

MAGNETICALLY ACTUATED TOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED WITH COIL Filed June 17, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 W A mad 4/ l6 OMUWQSMIWK PM 0 n E K .\.I.|.|I.|l w 6 7 E1. 5, 4 5 5) .m i T: P m m m m m5 n Hz .wu 6 F goo 35 39 4o 37 36 ee Inventor Richard R-AJamskl Sept. 21, 1965 R. R. AoAMskl 3,206,891

MAGNETICALLY ACTUATED TOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED WITH COIL 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1963 IIII IHI'I p 1965 R. R. ADAMSKl 3,206,891

MAGNETICALLY ACTUATED TOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED WITH COIL Filed June 17, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Inv eator Richard R. Adamski 2 WWW flHorn egs Sept. 21, 1965 R. R. ADAMSKI MAGNETICALLY ACTUATED TOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED WITH COIL Filed June 17, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 I lumlh lllHlh.

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Sept. 21, 1965 R. R. ADAMSKI 3,206,891

MAGNETICALLY ACTUATEDTOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED' WITH COIL Filed June 17, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 1117 D INVENTOR.

$4M: PM 2% United States Patent 3,206,891 MAGNETICALLY ACTUATED TOY VEHICLE AND ROADBED WITH COIL Richard R. Adamski, 3943 W. Diversey, Chicago, Ii]. Filed .Iune 17, 1963, Ser. No. 233,417 24 Claims. (Cl. 46-235) The present invention relates to a motor apparatus for a toy or the like and the following disclosure is offered for public dissemination upon the grant of a patent therefor.

The present application is a continuation-in-part of my prior application, Serial No. 34,989, filed June 9, 1960, and now abandoned.

Numerous devices have 'been used to provide control over the propulsion, steering and other power functions of a toy vehicle. For example, the common electric train principle of energizing the driving motor through the metal rails with the power control being maintained through the means for energizing the rails. Another expedient has been to use flexible wires which trailed from the vehicle and permitted controls to be connected to those wires to govern the functions of the vehicle. All of the prior art devices have one or more of the following disadvantages. They do not give the impression of realistic operation either because of only minimal functional control or because of non-realistic electrical connections, e.g. wires. They are expensive to manufacture and sell.

Other prior art device-s provide battery power on the vehicle with any controls affixed to the vehicle. This may permit the powering of the vehicle but does not enable any control over that power by an operator when the vehicle is in motion.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a simple, inexpensive power apparatus for a toy vehicle or the like. The apparatus requires no electrical connections to the vehicle so that it does not limit the possibilities of realistic appearance that may be given to the vehicle. My invention permits the operation of a plurality of motors on the vehicle, one of which for example, may be a driving motor, another a steering motor, etc.

One of the important features of my invention is that a constant remote control may be maintained over the operation of the motors on the vehicle. Thus the vehicle may be driven at varying speeds. It may be steered, etc. While the operation of the vehicle in most embodiments will be confined to a predetermined way, great latitude is available with respect to the size, configuration, and shape of that way.

A further advantage of my invention is that it will permit the construction of toy vehicles at a cost that in most instances will be less than the cost of other powered toy vehicles, even those which do not have the controllable functions available through the use of my invention. Its simplicity not only makes it low in cost but there is little to get out of order or malfunction. It can be set up and operated by children of the ages to which toy trains or the like have a great appeal.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a toy dump truck chassis embodying my invention;

FIGURE 2 is a section taken at line 2-2 of FIGURE FIGURE 3 is a plan view of a track such as might be employed with the embodiment of FIGURE 1 and also illustrating a schematic wiring diagram of a power unit;

FIGURE 4 is a partial section taken at line 4-4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a partial view of a sectional form of track;

FIGURE 6 is a front view of another embodiment of a toy vehicle incorporating my invention;

FIGURE 7 is a section as viewed at line 7-7 of FIG- URE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a section as viewed at line 8-8 of FIG- URE 7;

FIGURE 9 is a schematic wiring diagram of a track and power unit such as might be used with the embodiment of FIGURES 6-8;

FIGURE 10 is a front view of a third embodiment of a toy vehicle;

FIGURE 11 is a section taken at line 11-11 of FIG- URE 10;

FIGURE 12 is a schematic diagram of an alternative form of steering control; and

FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary illustration of an alternative motor.

FIGURES 1 and 2 illustrate a chassis generally 15 of a toy vehicle. In this instance the vehicle has the configuration of a dump truck. A chassis generally 15 in-.

cludes a pair of dirigible front wheels 16 rotatably mounted on stub axles 17 secured to sleeves 18 which are rotatably attached to the chassis bed 19 by kingpins 20. Steering arms 21 are secured to sleeves 18 and each are pivotally attached to a crossbar 22.

On bed 19 between the two front wheels is a boss 24 in which is rotatably mounted a shaft 25. At the upper end of shaft 25 an arm 26 is secured to the shaft with the other end of the arm 26 being pivotally attached to the center of crossbar 22 by a pin 27. A permanent magnet 28, having a north pole at one end and a south pole at the other, is attached at one end thereof to the bottom end of shaft 25. From the foregoing description it will be apparent that any turning of magnet 28 about the axis of shaft 25 will correspondingly turn the dirigible wheels 16.

Extending across the rear of bed 19 is a shaft 30. A pair of wheels 31 are rotatably mounted on shaft 30. Also pivotally mounted on shaft 30 are a pair of lugs 32 which are secured to the bottom of a dump body 33.

On the underside of the rear of the chassis 15 is the drive motor generally 35. It comprises a permanent magnet 36 secured in a ring 37. One end of the magnet beyond ring 37 is a north pole and the other end of the magnet beyond the opposite end of ring 37 is a south pole. A shaft 38 is secured to the upper side of ring 37 and is suitably journaled in bed 19. The upper end of this shaft is headed to hold the drive motor in place. A crossbar 39 is secured to the bottom of the forward end of ring 37. At the opposite ends of crossbar 39 are driving feet 40. These are formed of spring wire with one end being secured to crossbar 39 and the other end being somewhat pointed to form what might be called a tooth.

A pair of spaced lugs 42 project from the top side of ring 37. A spring wire 43 is affixed to lugs 42 and extends forwardly under bed 19. Adjacent the forward end of wire 43 it extends through an opening in a lug 44 projecting downwardly from the bottom of bed 19. As will be apparent from the subsequent description of the operation of my invention, wire 43 and its mounting between pivoting magnet 36 and lug 44, forms a means to impart a simple harmonic pivotal movement to the drive motor, e.g. to tune the magnet to have a given natural frequency of vibration.

Forwardly of drive motor 35 is a similar motor, generally 46, which raises and lowers the dump body 33. Motor 46 comprises a permanent magnet 47 mounted 3 in a ring 48. Ring 48 is secured to the bottom end of a shaft 49 journaled in a boss 50 on bed 19. A bent portion of shaft 49 forms an arm 51 and a depending finger 52. Secured to finger 52 is a spring 53 which is a driving member of a ratchet drive and cooperates with a ratchet wheel 54.

Wheel 54 is secured to a shaft 56 journaled in a post 57 extending from the top side of bed 19. Wheel 54 projects through an opening 58 in bed 19. Opening 58 is sufficiently large to permit the rotation of wheel 54 as well as the rotation of finger 59 secured to one side of the wheel. When wheel 54 rotates 180 degrees from the position illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2, finger 59 pushes upwardly on a ledge 60 at the forward end of dump body 33 so as to raise the dump body to the position illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 2. With a second 180 degree rotation of wheel 54 finger 59 returns to the position illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2 allowing dump body 33 to pivot back downwardly to the full line position in FIGURE 2.

Motor 46 includes a pair of lugs 62 extending from ring 48. A spring wire 63 is attached to lugs 62 and extends through a lug 64 projecting downwardly from bed 19.

FIGURES 3 and 4 illustrate an embodiment of the way and energizing coils that might be used in connection with the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2. This comprises a board generally 76 which might be of molded plastic, fiberboard, etc. The upper face of the board forms ways over which the toy vehicle, as represented by chassis 15, can move. The center line of these ways is defined by guide strips or wires 67 and 68 formed of a magnetic material. For example, the guide wires 67 and 68 may be soft iron wire.

As best seen in FIGURE 4, surrounding the guide wires 67 and 68 are electrical coils 69 and 70, respectively. Each of coils 69 and 70 are wound from a continuous length of an insulated conductor, e.g. varnished copper wire. Suitable covers 71 and 72 are employed about the coils 69 and 70, respectively, to hold the coils in shape and secured to the bottom of board 76.

The two ends of coil 69 terminate in conductors 74 and 75. Similarly the two ends of coil 70 terminate in conductors 76 and 77. As will be apparent from the following description, various modes of connection may be employed to energize the coils, one of which is illustrated in FIGURE 3. In this embodiment conductors 74 and 76 are connected together by Wire 78. Also connected to wire 78 is one side of a battery 79, a rheostat 80 and a rheostat 81. One side of a pair of momentary push button switches 82 and 83 is connected to the other side of battery 79 by a wire 84. A wire 85 connects the opposite side of switch 82 to conductor 77 and to one side of a condenser 86. A wire 87 connects the opposite side of switch 83 to a condenser 88 and to conductor 75. The contact arms of a pair of ganged, three-positon, switches 90 and 91 are connected together by a wire 92 which also connects to the opposite side of condensers 86 and 88.

Each of switches 90 and 91 have three contacts 90a, 90b and 90c and 91a, 91b and 910, respectively. The two contacts 90c and 91c are used for the off position. Contact 90b is connected by a wire 93 to a source of alternating current 94. Similarly, contact 91a is connected by a wire 95 to a second alternating current generator 96. The two alternating current generators 94 and 96 may be identical except for the fact that they generate currents of different frequencies. For example, generator 94 may be a 200 cycle-per-second generator, while generator 96 may be a 60-cycle generator. The other output leads of generators 94 and 96 are connected by wires 97 and 98 to the variable contact arms of rheostats 80 and 81, respectively.

Motors 35 and 46 are adjusted or tuned at the time of manufacture to operate at different frequencies. For example, if a ZOO-cycle generator 94 and a -cycle generator 96 are to be employed, one of the motors, say for example motor 46, would be produced to operate at a ZOO-cycle simple harmonic frequency while the other motor 35 would be produced to operate at a 60-cycle simple harmonic frequency. This frequency control is set by the unsupported lengths of the simple harmonic resonance means provided by Wires 43 and 63. For example, the unsupported length of spring wire 63 between lug 64 and the adjacent lug 62 will determine the natural harmonic frequency of pivotal movement of the motor 46 about shaft 49, assuming that all other factors such as the inertia of the magnet, etc., are constant. By lengthening or shortening the unsupported length of wire 63 this natural harmonic frequency may be adjusted. In actual production lugs 44 and 64 would be so positioned on bed 19 as to give the desired resonant frequency for motors 35 and 46, respectively, when they were assembled.

With chassis 15 positioned over coil 69 as illustrated in FIGURE 3 and rheostat 81 set to supply substantial power from generator 96 to coil 69, the motor in resonance with generator 96 will be actuated. In the combination suggested this would be motor 35.

As pictured in FIGURE 4, the alternating current passing through coils 69 and will set up a generally oval magnetic field about the coils, which field at the top has a relatively horizontal flux portion which will intersect magnet 36 of motor 35. With the current flowing in one direction through coil 69 during one-half of the alternating cycle, the flux in the top portion of the magnetic field will be in one direction transverse to magnet 36. In cross section as viewed in FIGURE 4, this flux portion is normal to the pivotal axis of the magnet as defined by shaft 38. This flux portion will tend to urge the permanent magnet 36 to pivot in one direction about shaft 38. During the second half of this cycle when the current is flowing the other way the polarity of the flux of the magnet field about coil 69 will be reversed. As a result magnet 36 will tend to rotate in the opposite direction about shaft 38 during the second half of the cycle. The pivotal movement of the motor is illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 8 with respect to motor 46.

Without the simple harmonic control means provided by spring 43 the rotational impulses on magnet 36 as a result of this changing magnetic field would have no utilizable effect. However, spring 43 provides the structure of motor 35 with a natural harmonic vibrational frequency. While other factors such as the weight of the magnet, etc., also will affect the determination of this frequency, these other factors initially are constant with the adjustment (or tuning) to define the natural harmonic frequency being determined by the unsupported length of spring 43.

When a series of impulses are applied to motor 35 by the changing magnetic field about coil 69 which impulses are timed so as to conform to the natural vibrational frequency of the motor 35, a cyclic pivotal movement, of the magnet 36 about shaft 38, of wide amplitude will be achieved. It is this wide amplitude movement obtained by the resonance between the magnetic field about coil 69 and the simple harmonic frequency of motor 35 that are utilized for powering the vehicle. In the absence of resonance insufiicient motion is obtained to be usable. While resonance must be obtained, the exact center of resonance is not critical and some variance in the unsupported length of spring 43 can be tolerated without substantially impairing the operation of motor 35.

The specific unsupported length of a spring to tune a particular motor to a given alternating current frequency is easily determined empirically. For example, if it were desired to ascertain just where lug 44 should be positioned with respect to the adjacent lug 42 to tune motor 35 to operate at 60 cycles, it is only necessary to disengage lug 44 from chassis bed 19 and, with magnet 36 positioned over a coil 69 energized by a 60-cycle alternating current, to slide lug 44 back and forth along wire 43. The amplitude of oscillatory vibration of magnet 36 about shaft 38 will change noticeably as the tuning point is reached and passed. When the point along wire 43 at which the magnet 36 oscillates the greatest is determined that signifies the tuning of the motor 35. Lug 44 then should be secured to bed 19 so that it will have the same position along wire 43 as was determined by the tuning operation.

As magnet 36 pivots back and forth about shaft 38 driving members 40 will be reciprocated forward and backward (along an arcuate path) with respect to chassis 15. During the forward stroke the teeth at the bottom end of the driving members will slide over the surface of board 66. However, during the rearward stroke the teeth will engage the upper surface of board 66 to propel the chassis 15 forwardly.

As viewed in FIGURE 3 a chassis 15, when guided as hereinafter described, will be driven in a clockwise direction in a circle straddling coil 69. The steering of the chassis 15 about this circle is achieved by magnet 28 which will follow guide wire 67 to which it is attracted. Magnet 28 is not affected by the alternating magnetic field about coil 69 to an extent sufiicient to disturb its attraction for guide wire 67.

If it is desired to turn the chassis 15 over onto coil 70, the operator waits until the chassis is about in the position illustrated in FIGURE 3. At this instant switch 83 is closed momentarily. Switch 83 causes a flow of direct current from battery 79 through coil 69. The direct current will set up a non-alternating magnetic field about coil 69 conforming in shape to the field illustrated in FIGURE 4. Assuming that magnet 28 is mounted so that the front end is a north pole and the back end (at shaft 25) is a south pole, the magnetic field about coil 69 should be such that the fiux as viewed in FIGURE 4 has the effect of a south pole on the left side and a north pole on the right side. This will turn magnet 28 to the dotted line position illustrated in FIGURE 3 and cause the chassis 15 to be steered away from coil 69 and towards coil 70. Should chassis 15 be steered in the opposite direction (toward the axis of the circle defined by guide wire 67) this can be corrected by reversing the connections of battery 79 from those illustrated in FIGURE 3. The direct current from battery 79 is isolated from generators 94 and 96 by condenser 88. Of course, condenser 88 does not obstruct the flow of alternating current from the generators to coil 69.

Coil 70 will be energized through condenser 86. As chassis 15 arrives over coil 70, magnet 28 will pick up guide wire 68 and steer the chassis along coil 70. As soon as motor 35 arrives over coil 70 it will again be energized to continue driving the car. To return the chassis from coil 70 to coil 69, switch 82 will be closed momentarily when the chassis 15 is approaching the area indicated by section line 44 so as to cause steering magnet 28 to turn the chassis over towards coil 69.

If the upper surface of board 66 is relatively hard, as for example, a pressed fiberboard, it is desirable to have the ways along which the chassis will run, defined by a plurality of transverse ridges such as those indicated at 100 in FIGURE 2. These ridges have been illustrated in somewhat enlarged form in this figure so that they will be apparent. They need not be as high as those illustrated. The ridges should extend the full width of the distance between driving members 40 since their purpose is to provide engagement of the driving members 40 with the surface of board 66. The ridges should be spaced from each other approximately two-thirds of the maximum amplitude of the forward and reverse movement of driving members 40 so as to permit the motor 35 to develop its full pivotal vibration and to build up its momentum much as in a flywheel. In other embodiments the ends of the driving members 40, instead of being pointed, might have small rubber feet thereon.

To raise the dump body 33 the ganged switches 90 and 91 would be turned to reposition the switch arms on contacts 90b and 911), respectively. This would disconnect generator 96 from the two coils 69 and 70 and at the same time would connect generator 94 to those two coils. Rheostat would be adjusted to provide sufiicient flux about coils 69 and 70 to start the pivotal reciprocation of magnet 47 of motor 46. Motor 35 of course would not operate because it would not be synchronized with the frequency of generator 94.

The vibration of motor 46 would move ratchet tooth 53 back and forth along ratchet wheel 54, thus rotating the wheel and raising finger 59 to lift the dump body 33 as illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 2. At the raised position the dumping could be halted either by shutting off motor 46 with rheostat 80 or by moving switch (and 91) to contacts 900 and 910, respectively, at which time both motors would be de-energized. Dump body 33 could be lowered by again energizing motor 46 to rotate ratchet wheel 54 at an additional 180 degrees.

It will be apparent that a motor, e.g., 46, and ratchet mechanism, e.g., 53, 54, could be used in numerous applications in a toy or the like to achieve a rotary motion. As a matter of fact such a mechanism could be connected to one of the wheels, e.g., 31, to propel the vehicle. The ratchet teeth can be on a side of the ratchet wheel as illustrated, or could be about the periphery of the wheel.

FIGURE 5 illustrates one of the various types of alternative tracks that would be apparent to one skilled in the art from the foregoing description of my invention. In this embodiment the track is formed of molded plastic with the coils and guide wires embedded therein. The plastic is flexible so that curves may be formed merely by bending the track. Similarly, the track might be superelevated around the curves. Two sections are illustrated in FIGURE 5 one an end section which forms a loop to turn the vehicle around, the second is one of a series of straight sections generally 106, which of course might be curved by flexing as previously mentioned. Section 105 has a coil 107 embedded therein. Along the portion of the coil that is used as a way is a centered guide wire 108 of magnetic material. The two ends of the coil 107 are connected to electrical sockets 109.

Section 106 has a coil 110 embedded therein with guide wires 111 and 112 extending down the elongated parallel sides of coil 110. Along a side of straight section 106 are a pair of binding posts 114 and 115 to which wires 78 and 85 (or 78 and 87) of FIGURE 3 may be connected. A feed wire 116 is connected to binding post 114 and to a plug 117 on the end of section 106. One end of coil 110 also is connected to plug 117. A feed wire 118 similarly is connected to binding post 115 and plug 119. The other end of coil 110 is connected to plug 119 also.

It will be apparent that the alternating electric current supplied to binding posts 114 and 115 will feed coil 110 as well as coil 107 through the plug and socket connections between the two sections. Additional sections (not shown) may similarly be connected to the opposite end of section 106. The use of plug and socket connections will be apparent to one skilled in the art and additional recital of details and variations thereof is unnecessary in the light of the foregoing.

Assuming that chassis 15 were running to the left along guide wire 111, magnet 28 upon reaching the left end of the guide wire would immediately be attracted by the adjacent end of guide wire 108. The chassis 15 thereupon would be guided around the loop defined by guide wire 108 and upon reaching the lower end of that guide wire, as viewed in FIGURE 5, magnet 28 would be attracted by the end of guide wire 112 and the chassis would thereupon proceed to the right along the way defined by guide wire 112.

The particular form of track will depend upon the preferences of manufacturer and user. If the track is in the form of a single way or loop, whether circular, oval or otherwise, it is not necessary that the steering element 28 of chassis be a magnet. For example, assume that chassis 15 is to run only on the way define by coil 69 of FIGURE 3. In that case the chassis 15 will be steered along this coil even though the steering element 28 is formed of unmagnetized soft iron. With alternating current flowing through coil 69 as previously described a soft iron element positioned as is magnet 28 on chassis 15 will remain centered in the magnetic field set up about coil 69. Thus the soft iron element 28 will follow that magnetic field and steer the dirigible wheels 16 so as to follow that magnetic path.

FIGURES 6-9 llustrate an alternatively steered vehicle in which the steering is performed by a motor of my invention with no guide wire being used along the way to control the path of the vehicle as was the case with the embodiment of FIGURES 1-3. In this embodiment there is a vehicle chassis generally 122 comprising a chassis bed 123. At the rear of bed 123 is a drive motor generally 35' which is identical with the motor 35 in the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 except that shaft 38 is journaled in an externally threaded sleeve 124 attached to bed 123 by nuts 125. This form of mounting permits some vertical adjustment of motor 35'. The parts of motor 35 that correspond to the parts of motor 35 have been given the same numbers except with a prime thereafter in FIGURES 6-8.

Rear wheels 126 are journaled on an axle 127 secured to lugs 128. Lugs 128 in turn are attached to bed 123. At the front of chassis 122 are dirigible wheels 130 rotatably mounted on stub axles 131. Axles 131 and steering arms 132 are secured to sleeves 133. Pivotally secured to steering arms 132 is a steering crossbar 134. Sleeves 133 are journaled on kingpins 135.

Projecting upwardly from crossbar 134 is a post 137. Extending forwardly from crossbar 134 is a bracket 138. A spring 139 connects bracket 138 and a post 140 on bed 123. Spring 139 is a tension spring and normally holds the wheels 130 in the full line position illustrated in FIG- URE 8.

Forwardly of motor 35' is a motor 46' which generally corresponds to motor 46 of FIGURES 1 and 2 and comprises a permanent magnet 57', a mounting ring 48 having a pair of lugs 62 thereon, a synchronizing spring 63 mounted between lugs 62' and 64. Extending upwardly from ring 46' is a shaft 142 which is journaled in a sleeve 143. Sleeve 143 is threaded externally and held to bed 123 by nuts 144. The upper end of shaft 142 is bent horizontally to form a steering arm 145 which is positioned to push against post 147 to steer the vehicle in conjunction with spring 139.

FIGURE 9 schematically illustrates the type of way and the power means for driving and steering chassis 122. A coil generally 147 is employed which defines an elongated way and which is relatively wide compared with the coils 69 and 70 of FIGURE 3. No guide wire is employed. A suitable supporting surface 148 (FIGURES 6 and 7) is provided above coil 147 to support the wheels of the vehicle. The two ends of the coil 147 are connected to wires 149 and 150. Alternating current generator 94, rheostat 80 and a single pole double throw switch 151 are connected in series between wires 149 and 150, as are alternating current generator 96', rheostat 81 and a single pole double throw switch 152. Generators 94 and 96' and rheostats 80 and 81' correspond to generators 94 and 96 and rheostats 8t and 81, respectively, of FIG- URE 3.

In the operation of this embodiment, motors 35' and 46' are energized simultaneously. This of course is done by closing switches 151 and 152 and positioning rheostats 80' and 81' so as to apply two alternating currents of different frequencies to coil 147. Generator 94 applies a 200 cycle alternating current to coil 147 to energize motor 46'. Generator 96' creates a 60-cycle alternating current to coil 147 to energize motor 35. Motor 35' will drive the vehicle forward in the same manner as described with respect to motor 35 of FIGURES 1 and 2.

Motor 46' will pivot back and forth about the axis of shaft 142 somewhat in the form illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 8. The magnitude of the vibrations will be dependent upon the strength of the magnetic field with which motor 46 is synchronized-in the described embodiment the 200-cycle magnetic field produced by generator 94. Thus, the strength of this magnetic field will be governed by the adjustment of rheostat The stronger the current, the greater the magnetic field, and the greater will be the amplitude of the pivotal movement of motor 46' about the axis of shaft 142. Conversely, the smaller the current passed by rheostat 80' the weaker will be the magnetic field and the smaller the amplitude of the vibrations of motor 46' about shaft 142.

The clockwise movements of motor 46' (as viewed in FIGURE 8) Will push against post 137 extending spring 139 and turning wheels towards the position illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 8. The counter-clockwise pivotal movements of motor 46' will be so fast that spring 139 will not have an opportunity to return wheels 130 to the full line position illustrated in that figure. Thus, post 137 and wheels 130, will tend to maintain the position determined by the maximum clockwise pivotal movement of motor 46.

Since this maximum amplitude of clockwise pivotal movement will be determined by the strength of the magnetic field from generator 94 the extent to which wheels 130 are turned from the full line position of FIGURE 8, toward the position illustrated in dotted lines, will be determined by the setting of rheostat 80. Thus, by turning rheostat 80 in one direction, dirigible wheels 130 may be turned one way while a reverse turning movement of resostat 80 will turn wheels 130 in the opposite direction.

From the foregoing it will be seen that chassis 122, while moving lengthwise along the way defined by coil 147, may be steered from one side to the other side of the way under the control of rheostat 80. Of course, once the vehicle is allowed to move outside the magnetic field encircling coil 147, steering control will be lost and the drive motor 35' similarly will be de-energized.

FIGURES 10 and 11 show a further modification of the use of my invention in a toy vehicle. In this embodiment there is a chassis, generally 155, having a chassis bed 156. At the rear of the chassis bed 156 an axle 157 is secured to mounting lugs 158. Journaled on the ends of axle 157 are a pair of wheels 159.

At the forward end of chassis bed 156 are a pair of caster mounted wheels 161 rotatably positioned on stub axles 162. Axles 162 are afiixed to arms 163 adjacent the rear end thereof. The forward end of the arms 163 are affixed to sleeves 164. Sleeves 164 are journaled on kingpins 165 mounted in yokes 166 secured to the front of bed 156. A connecting rod 167 is pivotally mounted on pins 168 secured to the top of the rearward portion of arms 163 so that wheels 161 will turn together. It might be noted that the form of the mounting of the wheels 161 is what might be termed a caster mounting.

In the middle of the forward portion of bed 156 is an opening 171. At each side of this opening is an upright post 172 secured to bed 156. A motor generally 173 is pivotally mounted on posts 172.

The motor 173 comprises a permanent magnet 174 secured in a non-magnetic mounting sleeve 175. Stub shafts 176 are secured to and project from each side of sleeve with the shafts being pivotally mounted in posts 172.

Extending rearwardly from sleeve 175 is an arm 178. A spring 179 has one end thereof hooked into an opening 180 in the extending end of arm 178. The other end of spring 179 is aflixed to a mounting block 181 secured to bed 156.

Arms 183 extend downwardly from shafts 176 and have outwardly projecting fingers 184 on the lower end thereof. Pusher members 185 are secured to fingers 184. Pusher members 185 are formed of spring wire and have teeth 186 at the bottom end thereof.

The embodiment of FIGURES 10 and 11 is operated on a track which in plan view could have substantially the appearance of the track in FIGURE 5. As seen particularly in FIGURE 10 the track has a supporting surface 190 over which the wheels 159 and 161 may travel. Below the supporting surface 190 is an elongated coil, generally 191. However, the coil 191 is formed of two spaced sections 192 and 193. Between the spaced sections and defining the way along which the coil 191 extends is a guide wire 194. Wire 194 is of magnetic material such as, for example, soft iron.

When the conductors forming coil 191 are energized by an alternating current generator a magnetic field having a pair of generally vertical loops about each of sections 192 and 193, respectively, is formed. Thus, in a vertical plane parallel to and intersecting guide wire 194 the central portions of the flux from sections 192 and 193 are generally vertical, normal to the axis of shafts 176 about which the motor pivots. These portions are seen generally vertical through the air gap between sections 192 and 193 as viewed in FIGURE 10. They are normal to the pivotal axis of the motor. The polarity of this flux of course will reverse during each half cycle of the alternating current.

The constantly reversing flux provides impulses tending to urge magnet 174 to pivot up and down about shafts 176 as illustrated in dotted lines in FIGURE 11. Without the motor 173 having a natural vibration frequency in resonance with the frequency of the alternating current there would be little physical effect on the motor. However, spring 179 is of such characteristics as to give the motor 173 a simple harmonic frequency equal to the frequency of the alternating current generator that is connected to coil 191. Thus, there is very substantial pivotal oscillation of magnet 174 about shafts 176 which is shown slightly exaggerated in dotted lines in FIGURE 11. This pivotal movement moves the pusher members 185 forwardly and back with the teeth 186 engaging the surface 190 during the rearward portion of this movement. The chassis 155 thus is propelled forwardly.

Interestingly enough with the caster mounting of the wheels 161 chassis 155 will follow guide wire 194 even in the absence of any special steering mechanism. It is believed that this is due to the fact that during the times of zero magnetic flux from coil 191 (which occurs twice each cycle) magnet 174 is attracted to guide wire 194 to maintain the magnet 174, and thus the chassis 155, centered over a length of guide wire 194. When a curve is encountered the portion of the chassis occupied by the length of magnet 174 tends to remain centered over the guide wire and the caster mounting of the front wheels causes them to turn so that the chassis negotiates the curve.

It might be mentioned that with a horizontally vibrating drive motor such as motor 35' in FIGURE 8 positioned in the same general longitudinal position on the chassis as is motor 173 of FIGURE 11 will also follow a guide wire if the chassis has caster mounted wheels, even though there are no special steering controls on those wheels. However, it will not follow a guide wire as satisfactorily as will a vertically vibrating motor such as that illustrated in FIGURES 10 and 11.

FIGURE 12 is a schematic illustration of a steering control apparatus for use with a vehicle such as that illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2, employing a propulsion motor 35 and a steering magnet 28 operatively connected to dirigible wheels 16. In the FIGURE 12 embodiment, the way is defined by coil 147 which would correspond to coil 147 described in connection with FIGURES 6, 7 and 9. One end of coil 147 is connected by a wire 200 to a variable tap 201 of step-down transformer 202. Transformer 202 is adapted, as by means of plug 203, to be energized by a suitable source of electricity such as the ordinary house wiring outlets, i.e. mains.

The other side of coil 147 is connected by means of a wire 205 to movable contact 206 of a resistor, i.e. impedance, 207. One end of resistor 207 is connected to the untapped end of the transformer secondary through a rectifier 208. The other end of resistor 207 is connected to the same point on the transformer secondary through rectifier 209. It will be noted from the schematic diagram that the two rectifiers 208 and 209 are reversed as respects each other insofar as their connection between the transformer and the resistor contact 206 are concerned. Thus with the alternating current supplied by transformer 202 from the source of power, the current will flow through rectifier 208 during one half cycle and through rectifier 209 during the other half cycle. Rectifiers 208 and 209 might be referred to as gates, each of which opens to per mit the flow of current only in one direction. The current which passes through rectifier 208 will flow through portion 207 of resistor 207 as well as through coil 147. Conversely the current that flows through rectifier 209 will flow through resistor portion 207" as well as through coil 147.

If movable contact 206 is set midway on resistor 207 so that the resistance in portion 207 of the resistor equals the resistance in the portion 207" thereof, then, for all practical purposes, the amount of current fiow through coil 147 during the half cycles of one polarity will be equal to the current flow through coil 147 during the half cycles of the opposite polarity. The result will be that the mag netic flux of one polarity created about coil 147 during one half cycle of current flow will be equal to the magnetic flux of the opposite polarity created about coil 147 during the reverse current flow. With a steering magnet of the type illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2, the magnet will assume a position at which its longitudinal axis (from pole to pole)) is transverse to the magnetic flux when the fluxes of opposite polarity are of equal strength.

Thus with the magnet connected to the dirigible Wheels 16 in a manner such that the wheels are straight when the magnet is parallel to the length of the way (transversely to the flux) as is the structure of FIGURES 1 and 2, the vehicle will proceed straight down the way so long as the currents in the two half cycles are equal. As a matter of fact, the momentum and inertia are such that should the vehicle not be steered as hereinafter described, it will run off the ends of the way as it reaches the curved ends from either of the straightaway portions illustrated in FIGURE 12. The propulsion of the car corresponds to that previously described, namely, the alternating flux of the magnetic field corresponds to the natural vibrational frequency of motor 35 and causes the motor to vibrate and propel the vehicle.

With a repositioning of movable contact 206, the relative resistance in portions 207 and 207" of the resistor are changed with respect to each other. For example, assume that contact arm 206 is turned clockwise from the position illustrated in FIGURE 12, i.e. the contact is moved to the left. At the new position of the contact arm, the resistance in the portion 207' is relatively large as compared to the resistance in the portion 207". Thus at the time when current is flowing through rectifier 208, there will be a comparatively large voltage drop, IR drop, across resistor 207 and the actual power applied to coil 147 will be correspondingly smaller. During the times when current flows through rectifier 209 and thus through portion 207" of the resistor, the voltage drop across the resistor will be comparatively small and the power applied to coil 147 will be correspondingly large. The result is that during the half cycles of one polarity, a comparatively large magnetic flux of one polarity will be set up about coil 147. During the half cycles of opposite polarity, the magnetic flux of the opposite polarity set up about coil 147 will be comparatively small.

With such a situation existing in a relatively steady state,

i.e. more than just a few alternations, steering magnet 28 is urged about its pivot in a direction predetermined by the polarities of the comparatively large and small magnetic fluxes. When movable contact 206 is turned to the other end of resistor 207, i.e. the right end in FIGURE 12, the relative voltage drop across the two portions 207' and 207" of resistor 207 are reversed, and the relative power applied to coil 147 during the two half cycles is reversed, with the result that the relative strengths of the two polarities of the magnetic field about coil 147 are reversed. Steering magnet 28 thereby is urged in the opposite direction. Of course as steering magnet 23 is urged, and turned, in one direction or the other, the dirigible wheels 16 are correspondingly turned. Motor 35 will continue to effectively propel the vehicle despite the change in position of variable contact 206 on resistor 207.

With movable contact 206 operatively connected to a simulated steering wheel, a person can have the pleasure of steering the vehicle as it moves along the way defined by coil 147. As the vehicle approaches one of the curved ends, the steering wheel must be turned to reposition contact arm 206 and cause the car to follow the way about the curved end. Upon again reaching the straightaway, contact arm 206 is centered and the vehicle will resume a straight course. Assuming that the width of the way, as measured between the inner and outer wires defining one side therof, is substantially greater than the width of the car, the car may be steered back and forth across that width so long as the major component of the movement of the ear is longitudinally of the way (and thus the longitudinal axis of the car is not too far displaced from the longitudinal axis of the way) and thus the relationship of the magnetic flux and the positions of the magnets are such that there is an effective action. Tap 201 on the transformer secondary is provided as a speed control. It of course could be connected to simulated throttle to enable the user to have the feeling of speed as well as directional control of a simulated vehicle.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the electrical art from the foregoing that other means may be employed to control the strength of the half cycles of current through coil 147. Thus two controlled solid state rectifiers could be employed and connected so that each passes a half cycle of current of a polarity opposite that of the other. Thyratrons could be simliarly employed. In either instance the relative levels at which the rectifiers commenced passing current could be adjusted to enable the currents in the two half cycles to be varied, thus varying the relative strengths of the magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity resulting from the two half cycles of current. While each of the gates provided by rectifiers 208 and 209 are opened to permit substantially a complete half cycle of current fiow, the gate provided by a thyratron or controlled rectifier could be opened only part way to permit a limited or controlled current flow.

FIGURE 13 illustrates an alternative form of motor embodying a magnet 212 mounted. on a gimbal 213. Gimbal 213 includes a shaft 214 journaled and supported by .a bearing 215. Magnet 212 is journaled on pins 216 of yolk 217 of the gimbal. A spring 219 is connected to magnet 212 and to a suitable fixed support 220. A ratchet tooth 221 is connected to shaft 214 by ratchet arm 222. A ratchet tooth 223 is connected to magnet 212 by ratchet arm 224. Ratchet teeth 221 and 223 engage a ratchet wheel 225 rotatably mounted by a shaft 226.

The vibrational system made up primarily of the mass of magnet 212 and the restoring force supplied by spring 219 will have a natural resonant frequency of vibration. When a magnetic field of that frequency is applied to magnet 212, it of course will commence to vibrate as previously described herein. If the magnetic field as applied to magnet 212 is substantially vertical as viewed in FIG- URE 13, the primary, if not complete, vibrational movement of magnet 212 will be in a vertical direction, i.e. about the horizontal axis defined by pins 216. Similarly if the magnetic field is primarily only horizontal, the magnet will vibrate in a horizontal direction about the vertical axis defined by shaft 214.

In the former instance ratchet tooth 223 will move vertically along ratchet wheel 225 rotating the wheel in the direction shown by arrow 227. In the latter instance, ratchet tooth 221 will move horizontally approximately across the top of ratchet wheel 225 creating movement in the same direction. Should the magnetic flux be at an angle with respect to the horizontal and vertical, the magnet 212 will correspondingly move in the gimbal mounting. In the latter instance the rotation of wheel 225 will be governed more or less by both of ratchet teeth 221 and 223, depending upon the exact angle of the magnetic field. In some instances it may assist in operating the ratchet wheel to position shaft 226 at a 45 degree angle between the axes of pins 216 and of shaft 214.

The ratchet mechanism of FIGURE 13 could be used to operate various desired mechanisms on toys or the like. For example, the ratchet wheel 225 could be operatively connected to one of the wheels of vehicles previously described to drive the vehicle. In such an instance the motor of FIGURE 13 has the advantage that it continues to operate even though the vehicle and the motor have moved somewhat outside one side of a way such as that defined by coil 147. With motors in which the magnet pivots only about a vertical axis, e.g. motor 35 of FIG- URE 1, the motor becomes ineffective at about the time it reaches the side of the way as defined by the outside wire therealong. There is a magnetic field outside that outside wire but the component of the flux changes from a horizontal direction to substantially a vertical direction outside of the outside wire. At such a position the motor of FIGURE 13 would continue to operate as long as it was within a magnetic field of reasonable strength, even though the flux component were in a vertical direction.

The motor of FIGURE 13 has been illustrated with only one restoring spring 219. This would be effective provided gimbal 213 did not have any substantial mass and inertia as compared to that of magnet 212. In some embodiments, it might be necessary to add a second restoring spring connected so as to compensate for the mass and inertia of the gimbal when the vibration was about the vertical axis of shaft 214 and maintain the same resonant frequency of vibration as that existing when the vibrational movement was about the axis of pins 216.

The foregoing description of specific embodiments is for the purpose of complying with 35 U.S.C. 112 and should not be construed as imposing unnecessary limitations upon the appended claims for various modifications and variations thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing disclosure. For example, the motors have been described as being operated by a magnetic flux produced by alternating current. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that similar, fluctuating, magnetic fields can be achieved by feeding the coils with a pulsating direct current as distinguished from an alternating current.

In several of the described embodiments it was taught how two motors may be selectively operated by tuning the motors to different frequencies and energizing the coil with an alternating current of a frequency in resonance with the motor that was sought to be operated. It is also possible to selectively operate two motors by placmg the axes of pivotal movement of the two motors at 90 degrees from each other and utilizing coils having the same 90 degree orientation to each other to energize the respective motors.

While magnets 36, 47 and 174 have been described as permanent magnets, it will be readily apparent that the same results could be achieved by electro-magnets energized by a direct current as, for example, a battery mounted on the vehicle chassis.

I claim:

1. A toy adapted to be connected to a source of electrical power and comprising a vehicle, a way and control means; said vehicle including a plurality of wheels, at least one of said wheels being dirigi-ble, a first magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about a first axis, means operatively connecting the magnet and the dirigible wheel to position said wheel in accordance with the pivotal position of the magnet, a second magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about an axis approximately parallel to the first axis, said second magnet including means such that the magnet is tuned to oscillate about the second axis at a given natural frequency of vibration, and means connected to said second magnet to propel said vehicle; said way including electromagnet means positioned to produce, when energized, a magnetic field along said way; said control means being connected to said source of power and to said electromagnet means to supply alternating current thereto in a series of positive and negative pulses at a frequency approximately that of said given frequency, said control means having a movable member by which the relative strengths of the positive and negative pulses may be varied.

2. A toy as set forth in claim 1, wherein said control means comprises two gates, one gate controlling the relative curent flow in one half cycle of the alternating current and the other gate controlling the relative current flow in the other half cycle.

3. A toy as set forth in claim 1, wherein said control means includes a transformer having a secondary, and impedance means connected between the secondary and said electromagnet means, said movable member being a part of said impedance means, said impedance means being effective to enlarge the negative pulses and reduce the positive pulses when the movable member is readjusted in one direction and vice versa.

4. A toy as set forth in claim 3, wherein said impedance means comprises a resistor having connections at each end thereof and a movable contact forming said movable member, a first rectifier connected to one of said connection, and a second rectifier connected to the other connection, said rectifiers being connected to pass current in opposite directions from each other as it flows between the transformer and the electromagnet means.

5. A toy adapted tobe connected to a source of electrical power and comprising a vehicle, a way and control means; said vehicle including a plurality of wheels, at least one of said wheels being dirigible, a first magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about a first axis normal to said way, means operatively connecting the magnet and the dirigible wheel to position said wheel in accordance with the pivotal position of the magnet, a second magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about an axis approximately parallel to the first axis, said second magnet including means such that the magnet is tuned to oscillate about the second axis at a given natural frequency, and means connected to said second magnet to propel said vehicle; said way including electromagnet means positioned to produce, when ener gized, a magnetic field along said way with a portion of said field extending across the top of the way in a direction transverse to the length of the way whereby said portion is approximately normal to said magnets; said control means being connected to said source of power and to said electromagnet means to supply alternating current thereto in a series of positive and negative pulses at a frequency approximately that of said given frequency, whereby said electromagnet means produces a magnetic flux along said way which flux has a first polarity from the positive pulses and a second polarity from the negative pulses which flux causes the second magnet to oscillate to drive the vehicle and positions the first magnet in a neutral position when the flux of the first polarity equals the flux of the second polarity to control the direction of the vehicle, said control means including a movable member effective when actuated, to increase the magnetic flux of one polarity above that of the magnetic flux of the other polarity whereby said first magnet is pivoted to change the course of said vehicle.

6. A propelling apparatus for a toy vehicle movable along a way, said apparatus comprising: means on said vehicle including a magnet pivotally mounted about an axis for single harmonic oscillatory movement about said axis at a given frequency, and means connected to said magnet to propel said vehicle in response to the oscillation of the magnet; electromagnetic means associated with said way to produce a pulsating magnetic field intersecting said magnet and substantially in resonance with said given frequency, whereby said field will impart impulses to said magnet to produce a resonant oscillatory movement of said magnet; and means to remotely steer said vehicle.

7. A propelling apparatus for a toy vehicle movable along a way, said apparatus comprising: means on said vehicle including a magnet pivotally mounted about an axis for simple harmonic oscillatory movement about axis at a given frequency, and means connected to said magnet to propel said vehicle in response to the oscillation of the magnet; electromagnetic means associated with said way to produce a pulsating magnetic field intersecting said magnet and substantially in resonance with said given frequency, whereby said field will impart impulses to said magnet to produce a resonant oscillatory movement of said magnet; and means to remotely steer said vehicle, said means including a second magnet pivotally mounted on said vehicle, and a control device connected to the electromagnet means to supply electric power thereto in a series of pulses alternating in polarity and having a movable member by which the relative strengths of the positive and negative pulses may be varied.

8. A motor apparatus for a movable toy, said apparatus comprising: means on said toy including a magnet pivotally mounted about an axis for simple harmonic oscillatory movement about said axis at a given natural frequency; and stationary electromagnetic means positioned in juxtaposition to said toy to produce a pulsating magnetic field intersecting said magnet and substantially in resonance with said given frequency, whereby said field will impart impulses to said magnet to produce a resonant pivotal oscillatory movement of said magnet.

9. A motor apparatus for a toy, said apparatus comprising: a stationary supporting member for said toy, means associated with said supporting member to create on alternating magnetic field with a portion of the flux extending above said member, said portion having a given orientation with respect to said member, a magnet pivotally mounted on said toy and positioned in said field, said magnet being pivoted about an axis normal to said portion whereby said magnet will be urged to pivot back and forth about said axis by the alternations in the flux in said position; and means connected to said magnet to tune said magnet to a simple harmonic pivotal movement to said magnet substantially in resonance with said alternating field.

10. A motor apparatus for a toy mounted on wheels, said apparatus comprising: means on said toy including a magnet pivotally mounted about an axis for simple harmonic pivotal movement about said axis at a given frequency; a supporting device for said toy and defining a way therefor; and electromagnetic means including wires attached to said device and extending along said way to produce a pulsating magnetic field intersecting said magnet and substantially in resonance with said given frequency, whereby said field will impart impulses to said magnet to produce a resonant pivotal oscillatory movement of said magnet.

11. A propelling apparatus for a toy vehicle movable along a way, said apparatus comprising: means on said vehicle including a magnet pivotally mounted about an axis for simple harmonic oscillatory movement about said axis at a given frequency, and means connected to said magnet to propel said vehicle in response to the oscillation of the magnet; stationary electromagnetic means associated with said way to produce a pulsating magnetic field intersecting said magnet and substantially in resonance with said given frequency, whereby said field will impart impulses .to said magnet to produce a resonant oscillatory movement of said magnet; and means to remotely steer said vehicle.

12. A motor for a toy apparatus comprising: a stationary supporting member for said toy; means associated with said supporting member to create an alternating magnetic field extending along a predetermined path with a portion of the flux of said field as viewed in a plane normal to said path extending above said member, said portion having a given orientation with respect to said member; a magnet pivotally mounted on said toy and positioned in said field, said magnet being pivoted about an axis normal to said portion whereby said magnet will be urged to pivot back and forth about said axis by the alternations in the fiux in said portion; means connected to said magnet to tune said magnet to a simple harmonic pivotal movement to said magnet substantially in resonance with said alternating field; means connected to said magnet to propel said toy in response to the pivotal movement of said magnet; and means to steer said toy along said path.

13. A propelling and steering apparatus for a vehicle having wheels to support said vehicle on a plane with one of said wheels being steerable, said apparatus comprising: means on said vehicle to propel said vehicle, said means including a first magnet pivotally mounted about an axis generally normal to said plane for oscillatory pivotal movement about said axis at a given frequency; a permanent magnet pivotally mounted on said vehicle and positioned immediately above the said plane, means connecting said permanent magnet and said steerable wheel to position said wheel in response to the position of said permanent magnet; a supporting device for said vehicle and defining a way therefor; a guide of magnetic material extending along said way to position said permanent magnet to steer said vehicle along said way; a plurality of electric conductors extending along said way at each side of said guide; means connected to said conductors to apply an alternating current of substantially said frequency to said conductors to produce an alternating magnetic field about said conductors to resonantly oscillate said first magnet; and means to apply a direct current to said conductors to create a fixed magnetic field thereabout to overcome the attraction of the permanent magnet for said guide.

14. A steering apparatus for a vehicle having wheels to support said vehicle on a plane with one of said wheels being steerable, said apparatus comprising: means on said vehicle to propel said vehicle: a permanent magnet pivotally mounted on said vehicle and positioned immediately above the said plane; means connecting said permanent magnet and said steerable wheel to position said wheel in response to the position of said permanent magnet; a supporting device for said vehicle and defining a way therefor; a guide of magnetic material extending along said way to position said permanent magnet to steer said vehicle along said way; a plurality of electric conductors extending along said Way adjacent said guide; and means to apply a direct current to said conductors to create a fixed magnetic field thereabout to overcome the attraction of the permanent magnet for said guide.

15. A selectively operable dual motor apparatus, said apparatus comprising: a first motor means including a first magnet pivotally mounted and tuned for oscillatory pivotal movement at a first frequency; a second motor means including a second magnet pivotally mounted and tuned for oscillatory pivotal movement at a second frequency; electromagnetic means to produce two pulsating magnetic fields intersecting said magnets, one of said fields being substantially in resonance with said first frequency and the second field being substantially in resonance with said second magnetic field; and control means connected to said electromagnetic means to selectively control the intensity of said fields and thereby selectively controlling the operation of said motor means.

16. A selectively operable dual motor apparatus, said apparatus comprising: a first motor means including a first magnet pivotally mounted about a first axis for oscillatory pivotal movement about said axis at a first frequency; a second motor means including a second magnet pivotally mounted about a second axis parallel to said first axis for oscillatory pivotal movement about said second axis at a second frequency; electromagnetic means to produce two pulsating magnetic fields having a portion thereof normal to said axes and intersecting said magnets, one of said fields being substantially in resonance with said first frequency and the second field being substantially in resonance with said second frequency; and control means connected to said electromagnetic means to selectively control the intensity of said fields and thereby selectively controlling the operation of said motor means.

17. A selectively operable dual motor apparatus for a toy mounted on wheels, said apparatus comprising: a first motor means mounted on said toy including a first magnet pivotally mounted about a first axis for simple harmonic pivotal movement about said axis at a first frequency; a second motor means mounted on said toy including a second magnet pivotally mounted about a second axis parallel to said first axis for simple harmonic pivotal movement about said second axis at a second frequency; a supporting device for said toy and defining a way therefor; electromagnetic means including wires attached to said device and extending along said way to produce two pulsating magnetic fields about said wires having a portion thereof normal to said axes and intersecting said magnets, one of said fields being substantially in resonance with said first frequency and the other field being substantially in resonance with said second frequency; and control means connected to said electromagnetic means to selectively control the intensity of said fields and thereby selectively controlling the operation of said motor means.

18. A selectively operable dual motor apparatus for a toy mounted on wheels, said apparatus comprising: a first motor means mounted on said toy including a first magnet pivotally mounted about a first axis for a simple harmonic pivotal movement about said axis at a first frequency; a second motor means mounted on said toy including a second magnet pivotally mounted about a second axis parallel to said first axis for simple harmonic pivotal movement about said second axis at a second frequency; a supporting device for said toy and defining a way therefor; an engaging member connected to the first magnet for forward and rearward movement in response to each oscillation of said first magnet, said member being positioned to engage said device during the rearward movement thereof; electromagnetic means including wires attached to said device and extending along said way to produce two pulsating magnetic fields having a portion thereof normal to said axes and intersecting said magnets, one of said fields being substantially in resonance with said first frequency and the other field being substantially in resonance with said second frequency; and control means connected to said electromagnetic means to selectively control the intensity of said fields and thereby selectively control the operation of said motor means.

19. A guided toy vehicle apparatus comprising: a supporting member defining a way for said vehicle; a guide of magnetic material extending substantially the length of said way; and a plurality of electric conductors extending substantially the length of said way at each side of said guide; a vehicle frame; wheel means adjacent each end of said frame for supporting said body on said way, the wheel means at one end of said body being caster mounted on said frame; a permanent magnet pivotally mounted on said frame between the ends thereof for simple harmonic pivotal oscillations of a given frequency with respect to said frame; a spring mounted tooth connected to said magnet for forward and rearward movement in response to the pivotal oscillations of said magnet, said tooth being positioned to engage said member during the rearward movement thereof to push the vehicle forwardly; and means connected to said conductors to apply an alternating current of substantially said frequency thereto.

20. A toy vehicle apparatus comprising: a supporting device defining a way; electromagnetic means including a plurality of conductors extending along said way to produce an oscillating magnetic field of a given frequency about said conductors with a portion of said field being above said way and transverse to the length of the way; said means including a control to vary the strength of said field; a wheel mounted vehicle having a steerable wheel, said vehicle including propelling means; a steering member connected to said steerable wheel and movable generally transverse to the length of the way to steer said wheel; means connected to said member resiliently urging said steering member in one direction; a magnet mounted on said vehicle for pivotal movement about an axis normal to said device; means connected to said magnet to tune said magnet to a simple harmonic pivotal movement to said magnet substantially in resonance with said alternating field, whereby said field will cause said magnet to pivot at substantially said frequency at an amplitude that is a function of the strength of said field; and a steering arm connected to said magnet to pivot therewith and operatively associated with said member to move said member against the resilient urging a distance that is a function of the extent of pivotal movement of said magnet.

21. A steering and drive motor apparatus for a toy vehicle having a dirigible wheel, said apparatus comprising: a first motor means mounted on said toy including a first magnet pivotally mounted about a first vertical axis for a simple harmonic pivotal movement about said axis at a first frequency; a second motor means mounted on said toy including a second magnet pivotally mounted about a second axis parallel to said first axis for a simple harmonic pivotal movement about said second axis at a second frequency; a supporting device for said toy and defining a way therefor; an engaging member connected to the first magnet for forward and rearward movement in response to each oscillation of said first magnet, said member being positioned to engage said device during the rearward movement thereof; means on said toy resiliently urging said dirigible wheel in one direction; steering arm means operatively connecting said dirigible wheel and said second magnet to turn said wheel in the other direction an amount that is a function of the amplitude of the vibrations of said second magnet; electromagnetic means including wires attached to said device and extending along said way to produce two pulsating magnetic fields having a portion thereof normal to said axes and intersecting said magnets, one of said fields being substantially in resonance with said first frequency and the other field being substantially in resonance with said second frequency; and control means connected to said electromagnetic means to selectively control the production of said fields and thereby selectively control the operation of said motor means.

22. An apparatus for connection to an alternating current generator to drive a toy vehicle having a simple harmonic magnet motor means therein, said apparatus comprising: a supporting member defining a way for said vehicle; a plurality of electrical conductors extending the length of said way and positioned in juxtaposition therealong, said conductors being positioned below said way; and means to connect said conductors to said generator with the current flow through all of conductors being in the same direction of the way at any instance of current flow, whereby current from said generator through said conductors will set up a magnetic field about said conductors with the field extending the length of said way and having a portion above said way and normal to said way.

23. In a movable toy vehicle for use with a stationary magnetic means creating an alternating magnetic field in with a portion of said field having a given orientation, the improvement comprising: a frame; a permanent magnet pivotally mounted on said frame for oscillatory movement about an axis, whereby when said toy is positioned with said magnet in said portion with said axis normal thereto said magnet will be urged to pivot back and forth about said axis by the alternations in the flux in said portion; and means connected to said magnet to tune said magnet to a simple harmonic pivotal movement to said magnet substantially in resonance with said alternating field.

24. A toy adapted to be connected to a source of electrical power and comprising a vehicle, a way and control means; said vehicle including a plurality of wheels, at least one of said wheels being dirigible, a first magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about a first axis, means operatively connecting the magnet and the dirigible wheel to position said wheel in accordance with the pivotal position of the magnet, a second magnet mounted on the vehicle for pivotal movement about an axis approximately parallel to the first axis, said second magnet including means such that the magnet is tuned to oscillate about the second axis at a given natural frequency, and means connected to said second magnet to propel said vehicle; said way including electromagnetic means positioned to produce, when energized, a magnetic field along said way; said control means being connected to said source of power and to said electromagnetic means to supply alternating current thereto in a series of positive and negative pulses at a frequency approximately that of said given frequency, whereby said electromagnetic means produces a magnetic flux along said way which flux has a first polarity from the positive pulses and a second polarity from the negative pulses which flux causes the second magnet to oscillate to drive the vehicle and position the first magnet in a neutral position when the flux of the first polarity equals the flux of the second polarity to control the direction of the vehicle, said control means including a movable member effective, when actuated, to increase the magnetic flux of one polarity above that of the magnetic flux of the other polarity whereby said first magnet is pivoted to change the course of said veic e.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,606,222 8/52 Cliiford 310-21 2,618,888 11/52 Hoff 46-235 2,965,044v 12/60 Johnson l04150 FOREIGN PATENTS 454,989 8/50 Italy.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2618888 *Oct 12, 1948Nov 25, 1952Jean M HoffToy vehicular system
US2965044 *May 3, 1956Dec 20, 1960Johnson Jr Clark EPower supplies for miniature electric railways
IT454989B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3290818 *Jun 17, 1964Dec 13, 1966Die Casting Machine Tools LtdSteering mechanisms for toy vehicles
US3324366 *Nov 27, 1963Jun 6, 1967Ryan John WTuned reed motors
US4459438 *May 3, 1983Jul 10, 1984Helmut KaiserApparatus comprising a track and articles for movement therealong
US4741418 *Oct 25, 1984May 3, 1988Helmut KaiserElectromagnetic energization system with non-coiled, single wire conductor
DE102005018535A1 *Apr 21, 2005Oct 26, 2006Winfried DieckmannBahnanlage für den Spielbetrieb
EP0091971A1 *Mar 27, 1982Oct 26, 1983Helmut Dipl.-Ing. KaiserArrangement for operating parts and accessories
EP0351496A2 *Apr 10, 1989Jan 24, 1990Helmut Dipl.-Ing. KaiserArrangement for starting and possibly operating/transporting and/or steering of parts by means of magnet rotors
EP0351496A3 *Apr 10, 1989Aug 28, 1991Helmut Dipl.-Ing. KaiserArrangement for starting and possibly operating/transporting and/or steering of parts by means of magnet rotors
EP1714686A1 *Apr 13, 2006Oct 25, 2006Winfried DieckmannTrack for toy vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/134, 104/300, 104/304, 310/22, 310/13
International ClassificationA63H18/00, A63H18/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63H18/10
European ClassificationA63H18/10