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Publication numberUS3207083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1965
Filing dateAug 21, 1963
Priority dateAug 21, 1963
Publication numberUS 3207083 A, US 3207083A, US-A-3207083, US3207083 A, US3207083A
InventorsLohry Kermit Dean, Royal Q Lohry, Lohry Leslie William
Original AssigneeLohry Kermit Dean, Royal Q Lohry, Lohry Leslie William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 3207083 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SSP- 21, 1965 K. D. LoHRY ErAL 3,207,083

PUMP

Filed Aug. 21, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 HG WrraeA/f Ys.

Sept. 21, 1965 K. D. LoHRY rAL PUMP 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 2l, 1963 TOR5 INVEZI AL 6l 551/5 WML/AM A fraz/v5 Ys.

Sept. 21, 1965 K. D. L oHRY ET AL 3,207,083

PUMP

Filed Aug. 2l, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 6666 /16 1z0 12a l/ 6@ 7 Y Vf/Q i h 6@ 5@ 54 www I' i 76 -A' Jim- N" ff United States Patent C) 3,207,083 PUMP Kermit Dean Lohry, 1721 Rebecca St.; Leslie William Lohry, 2315 Kennedy Drive; and Royal Q. Lohry, 1714 W. 17th, all of Sioux City, Iowa Filed Aug. 21, 1963, Ser. No. 303,509 3 Claims. (Cl. 103--175) This invention relates to a pump and more particularly to a fluid or liquid pump capable of supplying a steady flow of fluid material under extremely efficient operating conditions.

As conducive to a better understanding of the instant invention it should be understood that most conventional pump devices now in use, such as the well known diaphragm pump or gear pump, normally have a curve of flow of fluid material which varies with the position of the components providing a non-uniform rate of flow. Also, prior art structures are relatively inefficient requiring undue operating power and providing limited flow through. Furthermore, pump devices known heretofore have had a specific pumping capacity or have been unnecessarily complex in providing for adjustability thereof. Conventional structures of this type are also deficient in that they are incapable of being accommodated to specic operating necessities thereby requiring special pumping devices to be maintained for each operation.

A primary object of this invention is to provide a pump free from the foregoing and other disadvantages.

Another object of the instant invention is the provision of a pump having four Valve means readily re-arrangeable and providing a steady flow of fluid material without the normal curve of flow found in conventional pumping devices known heretofore.

A further object of the instant invention is the provision of a pumping structure wherein the valve cages and the valve means contained therein may be readily interchanged and removed for inspection or repair and wherein each of the valve means may be readily reversed within its respective valve cage to change the direction of the fluid flow through the pump.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a device of the character described, the assembly of which may be readily adapted to pump a first fluid material on the instroke of a piston means forming an integral part of the structure, and a second fluid material on the outstroke thereof so that the two fluids may be equally blended at the same time they are pumped.

Yet another object of the instant invention is the provision of a pumping device having a piston means with a packing formed of a synthetic material which requires no priming and is f such wear resistant nature that it will run dry without damage and will be highly self-sealing so that it will hold its prime.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pumping structure having a drive means including an antifriction or slider block which is particularly efficient reducing the necessary operating power.

An additional object of the instant invention is the provision of an eccentric drive means or a pumping device which is readily variable to adjust the stroke of the pump and thus can control the gallonage flow.

A still further object of the instant invention is to provide a pump of the type described which is readily adaptable to virtually any material by the simple expedient of changing the valve means inside each or any of the valve cages pointed out as the description of the invention proceeds and as shown on the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE l is a top plan view of a pumping device in accordance with the instant inventive concept showing one arrangement of the components thereof and with parts broken away for illustrative convenience;

FIGURE 2 is a front plan view thereof;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional View taken substantially on line 3-3 of FIGURE l and showing in detail the variable eccentric drive means;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse cross-sectional view` taken substantially on line 4-4 of FIG. 3, with parts broken away for illustrative convenience;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 5 5 of FIG. 2 showing in detail the slider block construction, with parts broken away for illustrative convenience;

FIGURE 6 is a transverse cross-sectional View taken substantially on line 6-6 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged sectional View taken substantially on line 7-7 of FIGURE 1 showing an end view of the pump and valve assembly;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 8 8 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 9-9 of FIGURE 1 showing in detail the piston means, with parts broken away for illustrative convenience;

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 10-10 of FIGURE 2 showing in detail the internal components of the pump and valve assembly; and

FIGURE 1l is a schematic view of a rearrangement of the components of the pumping device of the instant invention for use in pumping and simultaneously equally blending two different fluid materials.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to FIGURES 1 to 10, inclusive, a pump device in accordance with the instant invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 20 and comprises basically a pump and valve assembly shown at 22, and a drive means therefor including linkage means generally designated 24, an anti-friction or slider block shown generally at 26 for guiding and frictionlessly supporting the linkage means 24, and an eccentric means designated generally by the reference numeral 28 for receiving rotary power from a motor means (not shown) and adjustably translating the same into reciprocatory power to operate the pump 20.

The pump and valve assembly 22 includes a cylinder 30 defining a chamber therewithin having a forward portion 32 and a rearward portion 34 separated by a piston means 36 slidably mounted within the cylinder 30 intermediate the ends thereof.

The piston means 36 includes a piston shaft 38 and a piston member 40, the latter element being formed of a central backing plate 42 on either side of which are piston washers 44 preferably formed of a polytetrailuoroethylene such as Teon manufactured by DuPont combined with a stiffening agent, such as fiberglass and having peripheral edge portions in fluid tight contact with the interior wall surfaces of the cylinder 30. Retainer plates 46 are backed by washers 48, the entire assembly being removably securedto a threaded reduced end portion of the piston connecting rod or shaft 38 by nut means 50.

The piston connecting rod 38 passes through an end block 52 having a threaded nipple 54 thereon. A packing sleeve 56 circumscribes piston connecting rod 38 as do packing seals 58 formed of conventional hydraulic packing material and a packing nut 60 is threadably secured on the nipple 54 to maintain the packing in position.

The cylinder 30 engages at opposite ends in notches defined in end blocks 52 and 62, respectively, against O-rings or other conventional gasket materials 64, these elements being secured in related assembly by stud means 66 and nut means 68.

First, second, third, and fourth valve cages, 70, 72, 74, and 76, respectively, have first, second, third, and fourth valve means 78, 80, 82, and 84, respectively, removably supported therein in a manner to be more fully described hereinafter. Each valve cage is divided into two portions, one portion being defined by spacer cans 86, 88, 90, and 92, respectively, and the other portion being defined by end cans 94, 96, 98, and 100, respectively, the spacer and end cans of each valve cage having peripheral edges adapted to mate at 102, 104, 106, and 108, respectively, when the valve cages are in assembled relationship. The spacer cans 86, 88, 90, and 92 abut in sealing relationship O-rings 110, 112, 114, and 116, respectively, seated in grooves formed in end blocks 52 and 62, the valve cages being maintained in related assembly with the end blocks by assembly straps 118, stud means 120, and nut means 122.

Each spacer and end can has an inwardly directed peripheral flanges means 124 secured adjacent its aforementioned mating peripheral edge, these peripheral flanges receiving outwardly extending peripheral portions of support members 126 forming integral elements of valve means 78, 80, 82, and 84, respectively, O-rings 128 or the like being interposed to insure sealing contact. The support members 126 each have at least one aperture 130 defined therethrough and slidably receive doubleheaded valve stems 132 carrying valve plates 134 on one side of support members 126 adapted to close the apertures 130 when in contact with the support member 126. Spring means 136 circumscribe valve stems 132 on the opposite side of support plates 126 and normally bias valve plates 124 into contact with support members 126. The tension of spring means 136 is less than the pressure, either positive or negative, caused by the reciprocation of piston means 36 as explained hereinafter so that certain valve plates 134 are lifted when the piston means 36 moves forwardly within the cylinder 30 and other valve plates 134 are lifted when the piston means 36 moves rearwardly therewithin.

A first conduit means 138 is defined in end block 52 communicating between one portion of the first valve cage 70 and the rearward portion 34 of the chamber within cylinder 30. A second conduit means 140 is defined in end block 52 communicating between one portion of the second valve cage 72 and the rearward portion 34 of the chamber. Third and fourth conduit means 142 and 144, respectively, are defined in end block 62 communicating between one portion of third and fourth valve cages 74 and 76, respectively, and the forward portion 32 of the chamber within cylinder 30. Additional conduit means such as formed by hoses 146 and 148 communicate between and interconnect the other portions of second and third valve cages 72 and 74, respectively, and first and fourth valve cages 70 and 76, respectively, hose clamps 150 of conventional form being shown as clampingly engaging the hoses 146 and 148 about nipples 152, 154, 156, and S on the end cans of each Valve cage.

The other portion of at least one of the valve cages, first valve cage 70 as shown in the drawings, includes means defining an inlet 160 communicating with a source of uid material (not shown) to be pumped by the device of the instant invention. The other portion of at least one other valve cage, second Valve cage 72 as shown in the drawings, includes means defining an outlet 162 which may communicate with a conventional surge chamber 164 shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 10 to further reduce any non-uniformity in flow, such a chamber being found unnecessary with the device of the instant invention for most applications because of the evenness of ow produced by the novel arrangement of component parts.

The linkage means 24 includes a jam nut 166 locking the piston shaft Ito a pump connector 168 having bifurcated portions receiving therebetween part of a knuckle assembly 170 connected by a stud 172 to a reverse knuckle assembly 174 which in turn is pivotally secured to a stud 176 forming part of the adjustable eccentric means 28.

Substantially frictionless bearing means 178 are rotatably connected through the bifurcated portions of pump connector 168 and the knuckle assembly 170 and are ridingly received upon the lower portion of a guide chamber 180 of substantially rectangular cross-section defined by the slider block 26.

The eccentric means 28 includes an ecentric block 182 defining a longitudinally extending guide chamber 184 therewithin slidingly carrying an adjusting block 186 which threadably receives a longitudinally extending adjusting 4stud 188 having a manually rotatable wing nut head 190 extending through one end of the eccentric block 182. Pivot stud 176 extends transversely from the adjusting block 186 and is received in a longitudinally extending slot 192 in the side of the eccentric block 182. The reverse knuckle assembly 174 is pivotally secured on stud 176 between a spacer 194 and a lock nut 196. Means such as a nipple 198 extend transversely from eccentric block 182 and receive a motor shaft power take off 200 being locked thereto for rotation therewith in any conventional manner, such as by key means 202. A gauge pointer 204 rides over a scale means 206 secured externally to the eccentric block 182 to indicate the offset distance between the means 198 and the pivot stud 176 thereby facilitating measurement of the reciprocation of piston means 36 and the output from the pump 20.

The use and operation of the device of the instant invention as arranged in FIGURES l to 10 will now be apparent. The motor means (not shown) will rotate the motor shaft 200 which will in turn rotate the eccentric means 28 to translate the rotary power to reciprocatory power carried through linkage means 24 to the piston shaft 38 and causing forward and rearward movement of the piston means 36. Variation of the length of stroke may be readily adjusted by loosening the jam nut 166 and turning the adjusting stud 188 to vary the offset distance between the nipple 198 and the pivot stud 176. As the piston means 36 moves forwardly within the cylinders 30 fiuid material is withdrawn from a remote source (not shown) through the inlet 160 into the valve cage 70 and upwardly through the apertures 130 of the support member 126 of valve means 78, the valve plate 134 of which has been lifted against the tension of spring means 136 by the suction caused by the forward motion of piston means 36. The fluid material then passes through first conduit means 138 into the rearward portion of the chamber within the cylinder 30, being unable to pass outwardly through the second conduit means 140 since the valve plate 134 of second valve means 80 has been pulled into closed relationship by the tension of spring means 136 and by the suction from forward movement of the piston means 36 and also being unable to pass through additional conduit means 148 since valve plate 134 of fourth valve means 84 is closed by the tension of spring means 136 and the positive pressure on its top face from the forward movement of the piston means 36. Fluid material within the forward portion 32 of the chamber defined by cylinder 30 is forced through third conduit means 142 and third valve means 82, the valve plate 134 of which has been opened against the tension of spring means 136 by the positive pressure caused by forward movement of the piston means 36. This fluid material passes through additional conduit means 146 over the top face of the valve plate 134 of second valve means 80 and out of the system through the outlet 162 into surge chamber 164 if desired. On the rearward movement of piston means 36 valve plates 134 of first and third piston means 78 and 82, respectively, are closed and valve plates 134 of second and fourth valve means 80 and 84, respectively, are opened, fluid material passing under first valve means 78 through additional conduit means 148 and through fourth Valve means 84 and fourth conduit means 144 into the forward chamber 32 within the cylinder 30 to be later expelled on the forward stroke of the piston means 36 as described hereinbefore. Likewise, fluid material withdrawn into the rearward chamber 34 of the cylinder 30 on the forward stroke of the piston means 36, is expelled through second conduit means 140 and second valve means 80 to outlet 162 on the rearward movement of piston means 36.

It will be readily seen that any of the valve cages may be readily removed by simply loosening bolt means 122 and hose clamps 150. The valve cages are interchangeable as are the valve means and each valve means may be readily reversed within its respective valve cage by simply separating the spacer and end cans thereof and inverting the support member of the valve means before reassembling the same within its valve cage.

FIGURE 11 schematically shows a slight variation in the arrangement of the component parts of the pump of the instant invention to allow for the equal blending and simultaneously pumping of two different fluid materials. All of the elements are interconnected in a manner similar to the embodiments of FIGURES 1 to l0 except that fourth valve cage 76 is provided with means defining an inlet 160 in addition to the inlet 160 forming part of first valve cage 70. A common outlet 162 is provided on second valve cage 72' and second and third valve cages 72 and 74 respectively are interconnected by an additional conduit means 146. However, the nipples 152 and 158 of rst and fourth valve cages 7 0' and 7 6 respectively are not interconnected as in the arrangement of FIGURES 1 to 10 but are sealed so that on the forward stroke of piston means 36 a first fluid is withdrawn from a remote source through inlet 160' and the valve means within valve cage 70 to the rearward portion 34 of the chamber defined within the cylinder 30. This first fluid material is expelled through the common outlet 162 by being forced upwardly through the second conduit means and the second valve means within the second valve cage 72 on the rearward movement of the piston means 36'. A quantity of a second fluid material is withdrawn from a remote source through the inlet 160 in the fourth valve cage 76 passing upwardly through the valve means and the fourth conduit means to be received in the forward portion 32 of the chamber within the cylinder 30 on the rearward movement of the piston means 36', this quantity of second fluid material being expelled on the forward movement of the piston means 36 by passing upwardly through third conduit means and the third valve means within the third Valve cage 74', and outwardly through additional conduit means 146 to the common outlet 162'.

It will be readily seen that other variations on the specific arrangement of the component parts of the pump of the instant invention may be provided to satisfy various operational necessities.

It will now be seen that there has been herein provided a unique pump which satisfies all of the objectives of the instant invention and others, including many advantages of great practical utility and commercial importance.

Since many embodiments may be made of the instant inventive concept, and since many modifications may be made of the embodiments hereinbefore shown and described, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted merely as illustrative, and not in a limiting sense.

We claim:

1. A valve and valve cage assembly for use in a pump of the type including a cylinder defining a chamber having two ends, a piston slidably mounted intermediate the ends,

and a plurality of valve cages having valves therein, wherein each valve cage includes one portion defined by a spacer can and another portion defined by an open end can, said spacer and end cans of each of said valve cages having peripheral edges adapted to mate when said valve cage is in assembled relationship, each of said spacer and end cans having inwardly directed peripheral flange means secured adjacent said peripheral edges, each of said valve means including a support member having an outwardly extending peripheral portion receivable between said peripheral flanges of its respective spacer and end cans in fluid tight relationship, and means removably securing said spacer and end cans of each valve cage in assembled relationship.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said support member of each of said valve means is substantially planar and includes at least one aperture defined therethrough, a valve stem slidably mounted perpendicularly through said support member and carrying a valve plate on one side of said support member, said valve plate being adapted to close the apertures in said support member when in contact therewith, spring means on the other side of said support member normally biasing said valve plate into contact with said support member, the tension of said spring means being less than the pressure caused by the reciprocation of said piston means, whereby certain of said valve plates are lifted when said piston means moves forwardly in said chamber and others of said valve plates are lifted when said piston means moves rearwardly in said chamber.

3. The structure of claim 2 wherein said valve plates of alternate valve means are lifted when said piston means moves forwardly in said chamber and said valve plates of other alternate valve means are lifted when said piston means moves rearwardly in said chamber.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 33,914 12/61 Willett 103-175 36,267 8/62 Bender 103-175 94,190 8/69 Dixon 103-176 505,090 9/93 Carse 103-9 540,626 6/95 Barton 103-175 600,195 3/98 Dunn 103-9 604,767 5/98 Kughler 103--175 670,796 3/01 Lynch 103-9 1,614,733 1/27 Hufnagle 103-175 1,641,717 9/27 Welter 103-175 1,872,503 8/32 Repschleger 103-6 2,019,479 11/35 Buttner 103-9 2,216,573 10/40 Owsley 103-175 2,217,287 10/40 McNew 103-175 2,729,237 1/56 Hite 137-515.7 2,901,000 8/59 Wright 137-5157 2,933,049 4/ 60 Johnston 103-175 2,943,639 7/60 Smith 137-5157 2,957,422 10/60 Loeber 103-40 2,962,975 12/60 Camp 103-175 3,007,349 11/61 Loeber 74-571 3,040,666 6/62 Flynn 103-38 3,073,256 1/ 63 Browne 103-228 3,116,648 1/ 64 Arenhold 74-600 FOREIGN PATENTS 402,810 9/09 France. 753,821 8/33 France. 256,932 1/28 Italy.

LAURENCE V. EFNER, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3354830 *Jul 22, 1965Nov 28, 1967Rock Ola Mfg CorpPump means
US4043709 *Aug 21, 1975Aug 23, 1977Domain Industries, Inc.Adjustable stop assembly
US4093404 *Dec 19, 1975Jun 6, 1978Celanese CorporationApparatus for preparation of matrices containing frangible particulate matter
US4372903 *Sep 21, 1981Feb 8, 1983Cts CorporationProcess for controlling the movement of press components
US4936753 *Jun 3, 1988Jun 26, 1990The Aro CorporationDiaphragm pump with interchangeable valves and manifolds
US5076769 *Jul 16, 1990Dec 31, 1991The Dow Chemical CompanyDouble acting pump
US5407424 *Feb 24, 1993Apr 18, 1995Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Angioplasty perfusion pump
US6318967 *Mar 1, 2000Nov 20, 2001Dresser-Rand CompanyGas compression kit and method with interchangeable compression cylinders
US8628305Sep 5, 2007Jan 14, 2014Gardner Denver Thomas, Inc.Fluid intake and exhaust fittings for a compressor or pump
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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/454, 137/515.7, 92/13.7, 417/568, 417/536
International ClassificationF04B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B7/00
European ClassificationF04B7/00