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Publication numberUS3207211 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1965
Filing dateJul 3, 1963
Priority dateJul 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3207211 A, US 3207211A, US-A-3207211, US3207211 A, US3207211A
InventorsIrving J Winterfeldt
Original AssigneeIrving J Winterfeldt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eaves trough with radiation absorbing attachment
US 3207211 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 21, 1965 l. J. WINTERFELDT 3,207,211

EAVES THOUGH WITH RADIATION ABSORBING ATTACHMENT Filed July 5, 1963 I NVEN TOR.

/1///v-J WA/TEEFELD? United States Patent 3,207,211 EAVES TROUGH WITH RADIATION ABSORBING ATTACHMENT Irving J. Winterfeldt, 1537 Shemer Road, Northbrook, Ill. Filed July 3, 1963, Sel. No. 292,528 Claims. (Cl. 165-47) This invention relates to an eaves trough with radiation absorbing attachment.

In many areas, accumulations of ice in eaves troughs results in corrosion and other damage. Not only is the eaves trough subjected to excessive weight but water is backed up and may cause the adjacent eaves or roof to rot. In aggravated situations, the water may even enter the building to which the eaves trough is affixed.

I have discovered that relatively small tabs of metal of heat absorbing and conducting characteristics can be attached to an eaves trough at intervals of several feet in a projecting position to receive radiation from the sun or sky, the resulting heating of the trough being sufiicient to melt ice and slush and promote the flow and discharge of water from the eaves trough. It is even practicable to use tubular rivets to fasten the heat absorbing tab to the eaves trough so that any localized melting of ice will cause immediate discharge of the resulting water, thus keeping open that portion of the trough nearest to the tab to receive drainage from progressively more remote areas.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view in perspective of a portion of the eaves of a building and a length of caves trough equipped with radiation absorbing tabs in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged detail view in transverse section through the eaves trough and one of the rivets and a portion of one of the tabs, the remainder of the tab being shown in side elevation.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the structure shown in FIG. 2.

I have shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 3 a fragment of a typical eaves trough installation, the eaves being shown at 5, the roof boards at 7 and the shingles at 9.

The eaves trough 15 may be of any desired form in cross section. As shown, the trough has an integral flashing extension at 17 and a bead 19 in rectangular cross section by way of trim of its outer margin.

The bottom 21 of the trough has secured to it as by tubular rivets 23 or otherwise a plurality of radiation absorbing tabs 25 which are usually spaced along the trough as indicated in FIG. 1. In practice, these tabs are usually curved downwardly to a certain extent to expose upwardly and outwardly the relatively broad and generally flat face 27 which absorbs heat.

It is preferred that the metal used to make the tabs 25 should not be shiny. A dull surface of dark color is better for absorbing heat than a shiny surface of any color. However, even a tab of weathered aluminum absorbs a great deal of heat and conducts the heat to the bottom of the trough. Sufiicient heat for the purposes of this invention is communicated to a trough on the north side of a building, as well as to a trough in an area which is exposed directly to the sun.

Many people assume that as snow melts in an eaves trough the resulting water will immediately be discharged through the down spout. However, it more often happens that as snow melts in an eaves trough the water is held in suspension in the remaining snow to form slush, with progressive buildup of ice as increments of slush freeze during the night, The snow may act as a wick to pick up water from the bottom of the trough and prevent it from draining oif despite the fact that the trough is not fully obstructed by the snow.

With tabs applied to an eaves trough in accordance with ice the present invention, and at any appropriate distance such as 10 or 15 feet apart, sufficient increase in the temperature of the trough is created so that the snow in the trough near the tab is fully melted and the water is drained off through the tubular rivet or otherwise, thus creating an open space which progressively enlarges until the trough is clear.

Leaves which accumulate in eaves troughs tend to float past the small holes provided by the tubular rivets. Consequently, leaves do not seem to obstruct drainage through these rivets.

There is nothing critical about the spacing nor the dimensions of the tabs. Small tabs as shown are very inconspicuous. They need not be bare metal. The surfaces 27 can be painted to match the trim of the eaves or adjacent portions of the house. A layer of paint may increase rather than decrease heat absorption by the tab.

It will also be understood that while I have found the tubular rivets to be desirable, they are by no means an essential feature of the invention. In fact, the tabs may be made as integral parts of the trough or may have soldered or other connection thereto. However, it is desirable that the tabs be applied to the bottom rather than any other part of the trough and I have found the tubular rivet to be superior to any other form of connection because of the ancillary drainage it provides. I have found that ordinary rain water will normally run along the bottom of the trough without overflowing through the rivet but if an obstructoin tends to cause water accumulation to any substantial depth, the excess over the height of the rivet will escape through the port which the rivet provides.

I claim:

1. The combination with an eaves trough, of a radiation collecting tab attached in heat conductive relation thereto and projecting outwardly in a generally horizontal direction for a suflicient distance from its attachment to the trough to have a substantial exposure upwardly and having a broad heat absorbing surface exposed toward the sky, whereby said tab is adapted to deliver heat to the trough to melt ice and snow therein.

2. The combination with an eaves trough, of a radiation absorbing tab in heat conductive connection with the bottom of the trough and projecting outwardly in a generally horizontal direction from the trough with a heat absorbing surface sufiiciently remote from said connection with the bottom of the trough to be unshaded thereby, said surface facing upwardly, whereby said tab is adapted to deliver heat to the bottom of the trough to melt ice and slush therein.

3. The combination set forth in claim 2 in which said heat absorbing surface is a non-shiny surface curving somewhat downwardly as well as horizontally outwardly from the trough.

4. The combination with an eaves trough, of a radiation absorbing tab in heat conductive connection with the bottom of the trough and projecting outwardly in a generally horizontal direction from the trough with a heat absorbing surface sufficiently remote from said connection with the bottom of the trough to be unshaded thereby, said surface facing upwardly, whereby said tab is adapted to deliver heat to the bottom of the trough to melt ice and slush therein, a tubular rivet providing said connection of the tab to the bottom of the trough and providing a drain outlet from the trough.

5. The combination with an elongated eaves trough having a bottom, of a plurality of tabs spaced at intervals longitudinally of the trough and extending beneath the bottom thereof, each such tab having at least one tubular rivet extending through the bottom of the trough and connecting the tab with the trough while providing an auxiliary outlet from the trough through the rivet, the

several tabs projecting outwardly from the trough having exposed surfaces adapted to absorb heat radiation and being of conductive material adapted to deliver heat to the bottom of the trough for the melting of ice and slush therein.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 824,570 6/06 Myser et a1 50-9 page 60,

Spilsbury 50103 X Gay. Johnston 126271 Brunton. Andrassy 165133 X OTHER REFERENCES American Roofer and Siding Container, February 1961,

874,510 12/07 Johnston s0 4 10 CHARLES SUKALO, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US824570 *Jan 22, 1906Jun 26, 1906James F MyserEaves-trough.
US874510 *Jan 10, 1907Dec 24, 1907Theophilus JohnstonCornice-protector.
US2111251 *Sep 19, 1936Mar 15, 1938Anaconda Wire & Cable CoIcicle melter
US2780415 *Feb 23, 1952Feb 5, 1957Frazer W GayHeat pump operated system for house heating
US2998006 *Jul 1, 1958Aug 29, 1961John G JohnstonSolar fluid heater
US3001331 *Jun 19, 1959Sep 26, 1961Pendennis Company LtdThermal covering for roofs
US3039453 *Jul 1, 1959Jun 19, 1962Andrassy StellaHeater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3366168 *Oct 6, 1965Jan 30, 1968John H. DaleSolar heater roof drainer
US3388738 *May 23, 1966Jun 18, 1968Robert A. DeryRoof de-icer
US3716076 *Dec 7, 1970Feb 13, 1973Franzmeier ARain trough devices
US3792728 *Jan 19, 1973Feb 19, 1974Bernardi OApparatus for removing snow from pitched roofs
US4197834 *Apr 14, 1978Apr 15, 1980Nevins Robert LSolar energy collector and associated methods adapted for use with overlapped roof shingles on the roof of a building
US4223487 *Jan 18, 1979Sep 23, 1980St Clair Alfred LRoof construction and method of making the same
US4224923 *Aug 14, 1978Sep 30, 1980Wells Carl ESolar roof drain
US4291673 *Aug 9, 1979Sep 29, 1981Deutz Roger TPassive solar roof ice melter
US4333444 *Apr 4, 1980Jun 8, 1982Roger I. SellSolar powered ice melter for roofs
US4375805 *Feb 4, 1981Mar 8, 1983Weber Richard DSolar roof, eaves and gutter device
US4432341 *May 5, 1983Feb 21, 1984Future Tech, Inc.Solar heater and roof attachment means
US4606402 *Oct 10, 1980Aug 19, 1986Dupre Herman KSolar ice melter for roof eaves
US5887584 *Apr 27, 1998Mar 30, 1999Smith; Daryle R.Solar energy absorbing device for melting snow from an inclined roof
US8191319 *Aug 25, 2009Jun 5, 2012Hot Edge, Inc.Roof edge cable raceway and method of forming same
US8205397Jan 13, 2010Jun 26, 2012Hot Edge, Inc.Roof edge cable raceway and method of forming same
US8490336Apr 22, 2010Jul 23, 2013Hot Edge, Inc.Method of securing a heating cable to a roof
US8782960Aug 9, 2010Jul 22, 2014Malcolm Brent NarkMethod of securing a cable to a roof
US20110220093 *Sep 15, 2009Sep 15, 2011Cupa Innovacion S.L.U.Cover panel for capturing solar energy
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/47, 165/904, 52/173.1, 52/11, 126/569, 165/185
International ClassificationE04D13/076
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/0762, Y10S165/904
European ClassificationE04D13/076A