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Publication numberUS3208080 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1965
Filing dateMar 30, 1964
Priority dateMar 30, 1964
Publication numberUS 3208080 A, US 3208080A, US-A-3208080, US3208080 A, US3208080A
InventorsHirsch Arthur Ernest
Original AssigneeHirsch Arthur Ernest
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective helmet
US 3208080 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 28, 1965 A. E. HIRSCH 3,208,080

PROTECTIVE HELMET Filed March 30, 1964 FIG. 5. INVENTOR.

ARTHUR E. HIRSCH United States Patent 3,208,080 PROTECTIVE HELMET Arthur Ernest Hirsch, Montgomery County, Md assignor to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Mar. 30, 1964, Ser. No. 355,981 11 Claims. (Cl. 23) (Granted under Title 35, US. Code (1952), sec. 266) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes Without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

The present invention relates to a protective helmet. More particularly this invention relates to a protective helmet capable of absorbing shocks and so constructed as to permit collapsing for storage.

Such helmets in the past have been constructed with rigid shells which make the helmet bulky and difiicult to store. This becomes a problem especially when such helmets are used in a limited space environment in which there exists a desire for more equipment than space available. Further, the liners of such prior art protective helmets have generally employed resilient material. Materials of this nature have the disadvantage when used in a protective helmet of merely temporarily storing the energy of a shock only to release it a short time later thus transmitting the shocks to the wearer. In connection with the present invention it has been found desirable for the liner material to have the property of dissipating the energy of a shock applied to the helmet. This is found to be possible by constructing the liner of a crushable material such that the energy of shock is transformed and dissipated in the plastic deformation of the liner material. In another version of the invention there may be employed for the liner a plurality of fluid filled, vented compartments with flexible wall, thus rendering the liner reusable.

It is therefore an object of this invention to produce a collapsible protective helmet.

Another object of this invention is to provide a helmet which is designed to absorb and dissipate the energy of a shock applied thereto.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective View of a helmet constructed according to this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged section taken along the line 22 on FlGl;

FIG. 3 is a view of a modified arrangement of the liner and shell showing a mode of attachment of the liner to the shell;

FIG. 4 shows a modification of the liner employing fluid filled sections with vents; and

FIG. 5 shows a modification of the liner to allow for ventilation.

Referring to the drawings in which the invention embodied therein is illustrated, there is shown a helmet 11. The helmet 11 is composed of a plurality of overlapping segments 12 of a hard reinforced plastic resin or suitable equivalent material such as a nylon laminate or as nylon or fiberglass reinforcing in a polyester or epoxy resin binder. The individual segments are designed to form a collapsible outer shell of articulated segments and to conform to the shape of the wearers head. Alternatively, the segments may be elastically hinged together as by being attached to a stretchable layer of flexible material (not shown). This hard outer shell or layer prosass Patented Sept. 28, 1965 vides protection against penetration, while the segmental construction permits the helmet to be collapsed into a small volume for storage.

An inner liner 13 consists of a plurality of sections of a material selected for absorbing and dissipating the energy of a shock received by the helmet. These liner sections may be made from any of suitable material such as for example, the non-resilient polyurothance foams, orushable paper products, and vegetable fibers. Another form of construction of these sections is to form them as fluid containing bags 13a, as shown in FIG. 4, with venting means 13b of any suitable design to release the fluid if the pressure peak of the shock exceeds a predetermined level. In choosing materials for the inner liner, the material is selected to plastically deform at predetermined energy levels. As shown in FIG. 2 the helmet may be constructed by having the sections of the inner liner attached to the corresponding segments of the outer shell, as by a cement. The Whole of the helmet is then held together by a cloth covering 14 attached to the side of the liner sections nearest the wearers head.

In FIG. 3 the sections of the inner liner 13 are shown as enclosed in a cloth bag 15 with stitching 16 between the segments to hold them in place, and with the bags 15 being attached to the segments of the outer shell by threads or wires 17 passing through eyelets 18 which may be formed integral with or attached to the respective segments of the outer shell. In all these arrangements the sections of the inner liner are so mounted that allowance is made in the spacing of these sections to enable the helmet to be collapse-d. The thickness of the inner liner material is designed for the particular material selected to absorb the maximum or normally expected shocks, within the limitation of the practical size of the helmet.

FIG. 5 shows that the surface of the inner liner may be made in the form of ridges 20 to allow for ventilation of the wearers head. Some ventilation may be provided by the spacing between the sections of the liner. Additional ventilation may be provided by means of perforations through the liner material (not shown), and in cases where ventilation is of major concern and some of the strength of the outer layer may be sacrificed, the perforations may be extended through both the inner liner and outer layer or shell.

It is to be understood that this invention may be practiced in ways than as specifically Ways described, as for example, by having the outer layer and inner liner separable.

Obviously many modification-s and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. A protective helmet comprising:

an outer thin shell composed of a plurality of overlapping segments of a light stiff material means interconnecting said segments, Whereby said segments are collectively shaped to conform generally tothe shape of the wearers head; and

an inner liner secured to said outer shell comprising a layer made up of a plurality of sections of a material for absorbing and dissipating the energy of a shock, means hingedly connecting said sections whereby said sections conform generally to the shape of the Wearers head;

thereby providing an efiicient collapsible shock absorbing protective helmet.

2. A helmet as defined in claim 1 in which the outer shell is made of a fiberglass reinforced plastic resin.

3. A helmet as defined in claim 1 in which the outer shell is formed from nylon cloth laminate.

4. A helmet as defined in claim 1 in which the outer shell is made from a hardened plastic.

5. A helmet as defined in claim 1 in which the said liner material is a crushable material.

6. A helmet as defined in claim 5 in which the said crushable material is a foamed plastic.

7. A helmet as defined in claim 6 in which said foamed plastic is polystyrene.

8. A helmet as defined in claim 1, including a cloth bag in which the sections of material are enclosed, said bag being attached to each of said outer shell segments.

9. A protective helmet comprising:

an outer layer of overlapping segments each of said segments being formed of a mol-dable material having a high coefficient of elasticity;

means hingedly interconnecting adjacent segments of said outer layer; and

an inner liner secured to said outer layer comprising a plurality of sections of a suitable plastically deformable material, each of said sections being secured to a corresponding segment said sect-ions being hingedly interconnect-ed through said segments, thereby being generally conformable to the shape of the wearers head;

said outer layer being generally conformable to a head i to form in combination with said liner shock protective helmet. 10. A helmet as claimed in claim 9 in which the sections of the liner are fluid containing flexible walled elements having venting means, said venting means being effective to release the fluid at a predetermined level of shock pressure.

11. A helmet as claimed in claim 9 in which said helmet includes means to provide ventilation for the Wearers head while wearing the helmet.

a collapsable References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 642,649 2/00 Vaughan 23 X 1,268,223 -6/ l8 Eimer 26 X 3,039,109 6/ 62 Simpson 23 3,070,802 1/63 Bernardini et al. 26 3,082,427 3/63 Zbikowski 23 3,107,356 1 0/ 6-3 Pestronk et al. 23

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,053,195 3/59 Germany.

539,577 9/41 Great Britain F ROBERT V. SLOAN, Primary Examiner,

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US642649 *May 29, 1899Feb 6, 1900Norval C VaughanArmor.
US1268223 *Mar 30, 1918Jun 4, 1918William EimerBullet-proof garment.
US3039109 *Oct 16, 1958Jun 19, 1962Electric Storage Battery CoLining for safety helmets
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*DE1053195C Title not available
GB539577A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3529306 *Dec 17, 1968Sep 22, 1970Edward P ThorneEqualizer device
US3600714 *Mar 19, 1969Aug 24, 1971Hop N Gator IncHydraulic helmet
US3829900 *Aug 30, 1973Aug 20, 1974Mine Safety Appliances CoSafety hat energy absorbing liner
US3859666 *Mar 19, 1973Jan 14, 1975Michael T MariettaCrown cushion member
US3877076 *May 8, 1974Apr 15, 1975Mine Safety Appliances CoSafety hat energy absorbing liner
US4286339 *Dec 4, 1978Sep 1, 1981Coombs Peter AFireman's helmet with energy absorbing liner
US4766614 *Dec 31, 1986Aug 30, 1988Cantwell Jay SVentilated protective headgear
US5168576 *Oct 3, 1990Dec 8, 1992Krent Edward DBody protective device
US5423087 *Oct 2, 1991Jun 13, 1995Krent; Edward D.Body protective device
US5477563 *Oct 21, 1993Dec 26, 1995Giro Sport Design, Inc.Helmet having a planar-molded infrastructure
US6009561 *Aug 26, 1998Jan 4, 2000Bell Sports Inc.Helmet with rotatable accessory mount and method of making the same
US6009562 *Aug 26, 1998Jan 4, 2000Bell Sports, Inc.Helmet with accessory mounting apparatus and method of making the same
US6519782May 1, 2001Feb 18, 2003Hos Development CorporationBaseball catcher's chest protector
US6687912May 1, 2001Feb 10, 2004Hos Development CorporationBaseball catcher's shin guard
US6964066 *Mar 2, 2004Nov 15, 2005Mjd Innovations, LlcStretchable, size-adaptable fabric helmet insert with shock-absorbing structure
US7103923 *Jul 1, 2003Sep 12, 2006Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
US7636955 *Feb 18, 2006Dec 29, 2009Cylena Medical Technologies Inc.Protective apparel breathing assistance
US9332799 *Oct 14, 2014May 10, 2016Helmet Technologies LLCProtective apparatus and method for dissipating force
US20040107482 *Jul 1, 2003Jun 10, 2004Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
US20040199981 *Mar 2, 2004Oct 14, 2004Mjd Innovations, L.L.C.Stretchable, size-adaptable fabric helmet insert with shock-bsorbing structure
US20060150305 *Feb 18, 2006Jul 13, 2006Plut William JProtective apparel breathing assistance
US20070000025 *Sep 5, 2006Jan 4, 2007Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
US20070157370 *Jan 18, 2005Jul 12, 2007Pascal Joubert Des OuchesSemi-rigid protective helmet
US20070220663 *May 22, 2007Sep 27, 2007Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
US20070226881 *Jun 27, 2005Oct 4, 2007Prospective Concepts AgFlexible Protective Helmet
US20110113533 *May 19, 2011Manuel GuillenSports/swimming head protection device
US20120124718 *May 24, 2012Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
US20130191972 *Oct 13, 2011Aug 1, 2013Jeffrey Moss WoolfCollapsible helmet
EP0351147A1 *Jul 7, 1989Jan 17, 1990K&K INC.Protector and article of sportswear using the same
EP0921734A1 *Aug 11, 1997Jun 16, 1999March, Richard W., IIFlexible helmet
WO1999011152A1 *Sep 3, 1998Mar 11, 1999Sean CaylessProtective wearing article, for example helmet
WO2005002380A2 *Jul 1, 2004Jan 13, 2005Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
WO2005002380A3 *Jul 1, 2004Nov 24, 2005Brooke PicotteHead protector for infants, small children, senior citizens, adults or physically disabled individuals
WO2006005201A1 *Jun 27, 2005Jan 19, 2006Prospective Concepts AgFlexible protective helmet
WO2009090434A1 *Oct 10, 2008Jul 23, 2009Quesada Fernandez Jose Francisco RobertoHelmet protection device
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/414, 2/903
International ClassificationA42B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S2/903, A42B3/322
European ClassificationA42B3/32B