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Publication numberUS3208486 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1965
Filing dateOct 15, 1962
Priority dateOct 15, 1962
Publication numberUS 3208486 A, US 3208486A, US-A-3208486, US3208486 A, US3208486A
InventorsFromm Walter J
Original AssigneeProtectoseal Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refueling device
US 3208486 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

sem. 2a, 1965 uSheets-'Sheet 1 l Fild om. 15. 1962 MMM mx www mmm mm Nw f hm. bm, g WN Hm. i-. 1 I

www am.. N

NNMMNNWNW w. J. FRQMM 3,208,486 REFUELING nEvIcE Filed oct. 15, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 y y w. .1.1 FRoMM l REFUELING DEVICE- sept. 2s, `1965] s sheets-sheet 5 Filed oct. 15j i962 'K v 3,208,486 REFUELING DEVICE Walter J. Fromm, Chicago, lll., assigner to The Protectoseal Company, Chicago, lll., a corporation of Illinois Filed Oct. 15, 1962, Ser.. No. 230,415

1l Claims. (Cl. 141--208) The invention relates generally to nozzle structures and Vrnoreparti-cularly to tank refueling structures, as for example, for refueling diesel locomotives, aircraftl and other vehicles. v

In the past there have been numerous automatic shutoil nozzles. and the like, particularly in connection with gasoline pumps for use in filling automobile gasoline tanks' and the like. Generally these have operated at relatively low rate of flow and without'critical factors inthe shutoff operation. In the'case of refueling diesel locomotives, as well as in connection with-similar refueling of 'aircraft and the like, relatively large amounts of fuel are involved and ,llingytime thus becomes `a relatively critical -factor,v

it`being desirable to till the tanks asrapiflly as possible and y thus avoid unnecessary delays in connection with the refueling ope'ration.

Fast refueling also introduces other problems, as for example, the creation of a hammer` in the fuel feed-lines resulting from rapid closure operations vof the controlling valve, but-due to the high lrate of flow, the valve must close sufhcientlyrapidly to lavoid possible overowingfof the tank. Likewise; it is desirable that suchtanks be provided with atiame arrestor' to minimize the danger of tire or explosion.

T he present vinvention therefore has among its-objects the production of' an automatic'shut-otf nozzle which-is provided with a-variable ori'ce system,"whe1eby relativelyv uniform and predictableoperation will be achieved over a wide range of vflow rates, for example, from thirtyzle cannot be actuated unless' it is connected to a proper mating fitting and preferably which will automatically effect shut-effin the event the nozzle is removed from the tting'while the fuel is still flowing or require shutoff prior to disconnection. i'

.A'further objectof the invention is the production of such a novel structure which may also be provided with manually actuatable mechanism for effecting shut-off and inwhichthe nozzle is so designed vthat itv may, if desired,

be coupled to present'ttings and manually actuated.

A further object of the nvention'is the production of such a nozzleI structure which lmay operate in conjunction with'a llame arrestoron .the tankfitting and in which l theautomaticshut-ot'featurewill be actuated even though the nozzle iscoupled with a'titting not designed for automatic shut-oil. Y y k I Afurther lobjecty of the invention is vthe production of s uch a valve structure which is so designed that while fast action is achieved, the valve closes sufficiently slowly that hammer in the fuel feed linesis avoided.

A further object of the invention is the production of Many other objects and advantages of the construction the valve is in a closed position;

herein shown and described will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein given.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicatelike or corresponding parts:

FIG. l1 is a longitudinal sectional view vof a refueling nozzle constructed in accordance with the present inven-` tion; 1

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG. 1

lof the discharge end-of the nozzle, illustrating the same coupled to a supply tting of the type mounted on fuel receiving tanks, the valve mechanism being in closed position;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG.

l of the actuating mechanism, illustratingthe same in open position;

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken approximately on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG; 5 is a sectional View taken approximately on thel line 5*-5 of FIG. 3;

4FIG. 6 -is a -transverse sectional view taken imatelyonthe line 6--6 of FIG. 3; n

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of that portion of the nozzle structure illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 8 is a transverse sectional view imately on the line 8-8'of FIG. l;

approx- FIG. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view taken approximately on the line 9 9 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 10`is .a semi-diagrammatic ligure similar to FIG. l, illustrating the relationship of the actuating parts when FIG. l1 is a semi-diagrammatic figure similar to FIG.

10, the parts being illustrated in open positions similar y to that illustrated inYFIG. 3;

FIG. l2 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG.

lof a'irnodied knozzle structure, thevalve mechanism being villustrated in closed position; FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. l2, illustrating the position of the i parts when the valve is in open position and also illustrating use of means forvarying the operatbeing shown in position immediately following release of` the pilot valve member.

The invention generally contemplates the utilization of a valve member which is adapted to be controlled -by a suitable pilot valve mechanism, the controlling forces being derived from a pressure differential resulting from the liquid level Vin the tank effecting the liuid flowthrough a sensing tube. In the embodiment of the invention illustrated, the closure member for the .main liquid line is adapted to befhydraulically controlled in response to the operation of a pilot valve, the latter being actuatable under manual control or under automatic shut-off operation. The operation of the pilot valve preferably is such that it can be vsuitably operated only during the existence of certain predetermined conditions, asfor ex- Y ample, during operative connection to a receiving -filler structure, whereby undesired operation, when the nozzle is disconnected from the filler structure, is prevented.

Provision may also be made for suitably adjusting the operation of the sensing system to varying flow rates through the nozzle to provide relatively uniform and dependable operation for widely varying flow rates.

i E@ "Patented Sept. as, ieee taken approxi which may be supplemented by spring action or other `suitable means, the sensing mechanism controlling the position of a pilot valve which in turn controls the effective direction to which operating pressures are applied to the valve member, and thus the opening or closing thereof. I

General construction the body 1, a gasket 5 being interposed between the remaining surfaces of the members.

Mounted on the extensionv3 and axially movable relative thereto is a coupler member or sleeveti to which is rigidly secured, by suitable means such as bolts 7, a handle member 8, the coupler assembly comprising the sleeve 6 and handle 8 being -biased in a direction to the right as viewed in FIG. 1 by a compression spring 9.

Secured to the opposite end of the body member 1 is a vdiaphragm-supporting, generally disk-shaped member 11 and a generally cylindrically shaped member 12 which forms a supporting base for linkage operatively con nected-to a sensing diaphragm as hereinafter described. The adjacent outer end of the member 12 is adapted to be operatively covered by a generally cup-shaped member 13 having an annular flange 14 which may be secured to rthe member 12 by suitable means such as a press tit. The members 11 and 12 are suitably secured to the body 1, for example, by a plurality of cap screws or bolts 15, the member 12 being provided with recesses 15' in its exposed outer face to accommodate the heads of the screws 15.

Main valve system The outlet end of the main 'body member 1, adjacent v internal threads formed at the adjacent end of the tube 21, whereby the end of the tube is `tirmly secured to the adjacent wall of the member 11 in fluid tight relation. The outer end of the tube 21 is threaded into a tubular nose piece 24 which is carried by the hub 18, by vmeans of which the adjacent end of the tube is rigidly supported in operative position. Slidably mounted on the tube 21 is a hollow valve stem 25 which carries atits free outer end a valve member, indicatedgenerally by the numeral 26, comprising an outer generally conical-shaped member 27 and a somewhat similarly shaped inner member 28, the latter being provided with a stem portion 29 having external threads 31 thereon, the stem portion being disposed in an axially extending bore 32 in the member 27 provided with internal threads adapted to mate with the threads 31. Secured between the members 27 and 28 is a sealing ringor washer 33 of suitable semi-resilient material adapted to engage the valve seat 17 for operatively closing the nozzle. AThe valve member 26 is rigidly secured to the valve stem 25 by means of a threaded portion 34 formed on the outer end of the valve stem and coopcrablc with internal threads formed in the member 27. I

Secured to the opposite end of the valve stem 25 is a generally cylindrical piston 35 disposed between a front cap plate 36 and a rear cap plate 37, the piston assembly being disposed in a tubular cylinder sleeve or liner 38. The piston 35 is adapted to be sealed at its opposite sides by generally tubular-shaped diaphragms 39 and 41 which are adapted to extend generally concentric therewith. One end of the diaphragm 39 is disposed between the adjacent face of the piston 35 and the ca-p plate 36 for effecting a fluid tight seal between the piston and the diaphragm, and the opposite end of the diaphragm is provided with an annular enlargement or ring portion 42 which is seated in an annular-shaped recess in the body member 1 and abuts the adjacent end of the liner 38. In like manner the diaphragm 41 is secured to theadjacent end of the piston 35, the inner end portion of the diaphragm extending between the piston and the cap member 37 and adapted to be clamped therebetween in'tluid tight relation, while the opposite end of the diaphragm is provided with an annular enlargement or ring 43 disposed between the adjacent end of the liner 38 and opposed face of the member 11. The piston assembly is secured in operative relation by a lock bushing 44 which is threaded on the adjacent end of the stem 25 and is provided with an annular ange which bears on the adjacent outer face of the cap member 37. The outer'face of the cap member 36 abuts an annular tlange 45 integrally formed on the stem 25, whereby the piston 35, cap members 36 and 37 and portions of the diaphragms disposed therebetween may be clamped into a rigid unitary assembly.

The valve member 26 is urged to the right, as viewed `in FIG. 1, by a compression spring 46 bearing at one end on the cap member 36 and at the opposite end on an adjacent portion of the body member l. As the effective area ofthe piston 35 'is greater than the effectivearea of the member 28 the internal iluid pressure in the body member will create a force upon the piston, tending to move the latter to the right as viewed in FIG. 1, complementing the acti'on of the spring 46, with the combined forces of the spring and the pressure differential thus created being operative to effectively maintainthe valve member 26 in its closed position.

Valve control mechanism v The body memberl is also provided with a longitudinally extending bore v47, the axis of which extends parallel to the Aaxis of the tube 21 and valve stem 25 and axially Slidably in the bore 47 is a pilot valve member indicated generally by the numeral 48, illustrated as being provided with three radially'extending ange portions or enlargements 49, 51 and 52, respectively, eachof which is provided in its outer periphery with a circumferentially extending groove in which is disposed an O-ring 53. The right hand end of the valve member 48, as viewed in FIG. l, is provided with a generally T-shaped litting 54, more clearly illustrated in FIG. 8, having an axially extending portion 55, in which is received the adjacent end of the valve member 48, and a cross member 56 rigidly'l secured to the member 55 and adapted to extend laterallyv beyond the adjacent portions of the member 12 and cap member 13 which is formed to provide slots 57 through which the member 56 may extend.

The valve member 48 is normally biased in a direction to the left as viewed in FIG. l by a compression spring 58 and is adapted to be moved' to the right against the action of such spring by a handle member 59 which is suitably pivoted at its free ends 61 to the member 11. Thus by rotating the handle member 59 clockwise as viewed in,FIG. 1, it will, through engagement with the member 56, draw the valve mcmbcr 48 to thc right which, as hereinafter described, is adapted to efl'ect opening of the nozzle to permit thc flow of liquid therethrough.

Slidable in thc stem portion 23 of the hollow bolt 22 is a diaphragm guide member, indicated generally by the numeral 62, to which is secured a diapbragmd which is Irigidly clamped at its adjacent end edges between a generally cup-shaped piston 64 and vpiston cap or plate 65, the piston 64 bearing on a shoulder or flange 66 formed on the pin 62 and the assembly clamped in rigid relation by a bifurcatcd block or nut 67. The opposite end of the vdiaphragm 63 is'provided with an annular enlargement or' ring 68 which is disposed between the member 12 and adjacent portion of the disk-shaped member 11.

' sponding direction to -rock the toggle links 71 and 73.

The upper end of the link 73 is adapted to be guided by a pair of pins 75 and 76, whereby movement of the dia- .phragm piston and. block 67 to the right, as described,

will result in movement of the upper end of the link 73 in an upward direction. vMounted o n the upper end of the link, as illustrated in FIG. 8, is a suitable roller 77 which is adapted to engage the portion 55 ofthe member 54, as illustrated in FIG. 1. Thediaphragm piston 64 is normally urged in a direction to the right as viewed in FIG. l by a compression spring 78, one end of which'bears against the adjacent face of the piston 64 vand the opposite end against the adjacent face of the member'vll, so that the piston and block 67 lare'normally urged to thel right tending to move the link 73 upwardly.

. In the event `the handle 59 is actuated to move the valve member 48,. to'l the right, upon suieient movement ot` thel `valve member to a position such as illustrated in link 73 and roller 77 will be withdrawn from engagement with the member 54,permtting the valve member 48, under 'the action'ofthespring 58,`t`o` return to its original positionfas illustrated in'FIG. 1. As hereinafter de scribed, such operation of the piston 64 may be effected automatically under control ofthe liquid in the tank being filled, but manually actuatable means for achieving such results may be readily provided in the form of a manually actuatablebutton 79 which Iis axially aligned with the piston 64 and adapted'to engage the adjacent end of the block 67.' When the valve member 48 is in the position illustrated in' FIG. 3, so that by the application of pressure to the button 79 in opposition to the spring 78 the piston 64 may be moved to the position illustrated in FIG. 1, ythereby effecting release of the valve member 48.

: Hydraulic connections to the control mechanism f communicates with the adjacentl end of the cylinder liner 38 and-'adjacent face of the piston 35 through a generally axially extending' bore 82 formed in the body member 1. Theopposite face of thepiston 35 is adapted `to be operatively" connected to the interior of the bore 47 in which the pilot valveimember 48 is disposed through a port 83, thelatter being connected bya transversely extending bore 84, a Ylongitudinally extending bore 85 and transversely extending bore 86 with a recess 87 in the face of the member 11 adjacent the piston'35, whereby communications with' such side of thepiston and the interior of the' bore 47 .is achieved. The body member 1 is also provided with a bore 88 operatively connecting the bore 47 Awith the bore 82 and interior of the body member 1. The

bore 47 is also operatively connected through a longitudinally extending passageway 89 and a transversely extending passageway 9| with the interior of the extension fitting 3 at the downstream side of the valve seat 17 and valve` member 26. The O-rings 53 seal off portions of lthe bore A47 therebetween, and` the bores 88, 91, and 83 are so disposed that when the valve member .48 is in theA position illustrated in FIG. l, the bore 88 is operatively closed at its upper end, while the right hand side of the piston 35 is operatively connected through the passageways 86,`

85, 84, the portion of the bore 47 extending between the portions v49 and 51, and passageways 89 and 91 to the downstream side of the valve member 26. However, when the valve member 48 isin the position illustrated in FIG. 3, the right-hand side of the piston 35 is operatively v connected through the bore 88 with the interior `of the body member 1 while the passageway 89-91 remains unconnected inthe system.

The communicating passageways may be formed in any suitable manner and where necessary holes may be drilled from the exterior of the body member with the outer por? tions suitably plugged as will be apparent with respect to the passageways 88 and 91 as` illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3.

In like manner'the interior lside of the diaphragm piston 64 is operatively connected to a port 92 opening on the valve seat 17, by. a longitudinally extending bore of passageway 93 connected atV one end to the port 92 by a transversely extending passageway 94 and at the opposite end to a transversely extending passageway 95 vin the member 11 which opens on the peripheral face of the recess 96 formed in the member 11, the opposite end of the 'passageway 95interseeting a bore in the member 11 axially aligned with the bore 93 andv forming an extension thereof in the member 11. 'The portions of the bores 85 and 93 at the intersection of the' member 11 with the body member 1 may be suitably connected, for example, by providing counterbores 9.6 in which are disposed suitl Iable gasket members 97.

Noz'zle coupling structure `Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, thel nozzle structure thus fardescribed is adapted to be operatively engaged with- .a tank inlet fitting indicated generally by the numeral `101 inFIG.. 2, illustrated as comprising an outer tubular` body portion 102 which is adapted to be connected in uid tightP relation to the wall of the tank on which the structureis to be mounted, Iand provided at its outer end with internal threads 103 adapted to threadedly receive cooperable threads on a tubular member 104. The outer end of the latter is provided with rounded ends 105 adapted to engage a gasket member 106 carriedby the extension 3 to form a lluid tight seal between the latter and the fitting 101, theinternal vdiameter of the sleeve 104 being of a size to receive the free end of the extension 3, as clearly` illustrated in FIG. 2.

The tubular member 104 is also provided with a plurality of radially directed outwardly extending lugs 107 cooperable with inwardly directed lugs 108 on the coupler member 6. For example, it will be assumed that, in the. embodiment-of the invention illustrated, two lugs 107, disposed substantially apart, and a like number of lugs 108 are employed, each having an overall circumferential length of less than 90, whereby the lugs 108 may pass between the lugs 107 and upon rotation of the coupling member 6 through a quarter turn, by means of the handle 8, the cooperable lugs may be interlocked to retain the nozzle structure in operative engagement on the fitting 101.

The sleeve 104, as illustrated in FIG. 2, may be proillustrated as being provided with external threads adapted to mate with internal threads formed on the member 104.

Concentrically disposed in the flame arresting screen 109 and member`104 is a spider or yoke member 112 generally corresponding to the spider 18-19 .in the extension 3, having threegenerally radially extending leg portions 113 secured .adjacent their inner ends to a tubular member 114 and having their outer ends suitably secured to the adjacent inner face of the flame arresting screen 109, as for example, by means of flanges 115, formed on the outer end of cach leg 113, soldered or otherwise secured to the screen 109. Secured at-onc end to the tubular member 114 is a sensing tube 116, the opposite end of which extends through a suitable bushing structure 117, with thc extreme free end of the tube 116 being adapted to be positioned in the plane of the liquid surface in the filled tank. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the tubular member 114 is disposed in axial alignment with the tube 21 and fitting 24 of the nozzle structure, whereby the member 114 may be inserted in the latter when the nozzle is brought into coupling position, as illustrated in FIG. 2, the member 24 having a suitable O-ring 24a carried thereby adapted to operatively seal the connection between the members 24 and 114 when brought into operative engagement.

The spider structure 112 preferably is formed from relatively flexible sheet material whereby the member 114 and adjacent end of the tube 116 is provided with a support having some give or resiliency, thereby facilitating operative engagement' with the nozzle structure and eliminating the possibility of damage to the components due, for example, to improper handling or misalignment.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be noted'that the end of the valve member 48 adjacent the extension 3 is adapted to be disposed in a groove or channel 118 in the extension member 3 and is provided with reversely tapering conical-shaped portions 119. Also disposed in the channel 118 is a generally hairpin-shaped spring121, the bottom end of which, as viewed in FIGS. l and 2, is anchored under two pins 122 and 123. The upper leg of the vspring-121 is of greater lengthy than the bottom legl and-is provi-ded with a block or shoe 124 thereon,

rigidly secured thereto by any suitable means, as for example, spot'welding. It will 'be noted that the lower face of block 124 and the adjacent portion of the spring 121 is shaped complementally to the conical portions 119 of the pilot valve 48 `so that when the parts are in the positions illustratedin'FIG. 1, the block 124 is locked with respect to radially outward movement by the handle member 8 which overlies the same. However, when the handle member 8 and coupling member 6 are in the positions illustrated in FIG. 2, with the nozzle structure operatively connected to thev supply tank fitting 101,- the valve member may be moved to the position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, moving the adjacent end of the spring 121 and the block 124 upwardly, whereby the latter is disposed between the handle member 8 and the adjacent end of the body member 1. The member 6, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, may be provided with a plurality of notches 124' of a size to receive the block 124. v

It willbe apparentthat this construction performs two functions, the first being to lock the valve member 48 in a closed position as illustrated in FIG. l when the nozzle is not coupled to the supply fitting, the spring 121 being constructed to normally bias the block 124 in its inner position as illustrated in FIG. l, whereby the nozzle cannot be actuated until it is properly coupled with the supply tank fitting. The second function takes place when the block 124 is disposed as illustrated in FIG. 2, whereby complete disconnection of the coupling member 6 from the supply tank fitting is prevented unless the valve member 48 is in its off position, so that fluid flow through the nozzle structure must be stopped before the nozzle canbe disconnected from the supply tank fitting. This is accomplished as a result of the block 124 falling into one ofthe notches 124' on the coupling member when the latter is partially rotated, thereby locking the coupling member to the body member and preventing further Operation The operation ofthe nozzle structure as described, will be apparent from a reference to FIGS. 10 and 1l, which are semi-digrammatic in form and in which the fluid passageways with respect to the control structure have been shifted from the positions which they actually occupy in the structure as described, to simplify the figure and more clearly show the general relationships involved.

FIG. l0 illustrates the relationship of the parts when the valve structure is in a closed or inoperative relation. In this position the valve member 26 is at the extreme right hand limit of its travel, sealing the nozzle and liquid under pressure in the interior 81 of the body member is effective against the adjacent face of the piston 35, supplementing the action of the spring 46 to maintain the valve member in closed position. The opposite side of the piston is operatively connected through the passageways 84, 85 and 86 with the passageways 89 which opens on the down stream side of the valve member 26, so that the right hand face of the piston 35 has merely atmospheric pressure thereon. At the same time the pis- -ton 64 is at the end of its inward movement with the roller 77 riding upon the member 55.

The parts thus generally correspond to the positions illustrated in FIG. l. Assuming that the nozzle, following its connection to the supply tank fitting and tube 116, as illustrated in FIG. 2, it will be noted that the operative connection of the tube 21 with the tube 116 will form a continuous passageway from the end of the tube 116 disposed within the supply tank to the left hand side of the diaphragm piston 64, such passageway extending from the end of the tube 116 through the member 114, member 24, tube 21, fitting 36'and member 62, the latter as Y illustrated having an axially extending bore therein which intersects one or more transversely or radially extending bores in the fitting 62, whereby operative communication is established to the piston 64.

To actuate the nozzle structureto open position, the handle 59 is rotated clockwise to a position such as illustrated in FIG. 3, thereby drawing the pilot valve 48 to the right as viewed in FIG. 3 and as the roller 77 clears the adjacent inner end of the member 55, the links 71 and 73 will assume the positions illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 11, thereby latching the valve member 48 in such position. The passageway 84, 85, 86 to the right hand side of the piston 35 is thereby operatively connected through the passageway 88 and the interior 81 of the nozzle structure, resulting in application of the liquid pressure in the nozzle to the right hand side of the piston 35. At -the same time such movement in valve member 48 has resulted in disconnection of the passageway 89 with the passageway 84, 85, 86. Movement of the links 71 and 73 to the position illustrated in FIG. 1l also will permit the piston 64 to move to the right, under action of the spring 78.

As fluid enters the cylinder at the right hand face of the piston 35, the original pressure differential existing on the piston 35 when the parts are in closed relation as illustrated in FIG. l0, resulting from the internal fluid pressure on the left side of the piston and atmospheric pressure on the right side of the piston will be eliminated. The internal pressure on the valve member 26 will now overcome the action of the spring 46, which now exerts the only force tending to urge the valve member to the right, and the piston 35 and valve member 26 will move to the left to open the nozzle, the amounbof such movement depending upon the operational characteristics involved.

Fluid will now flow through the nozzle structure into the tank, such action creating a pressure drop at the valve seat 17 which forms a part of the venturi formed by the internal configuration of the passageway 81 and shape of the valve member 26, whereby a reduced pres- 95, 93, 94, whereby the pressure drop created by the ven-l turi is balanced by the inflow of vapor through the sensing tube and the spring 78. Such action continues until the liquid in thetank reaches a point where it at least momentarily blocks the adjacent end of the sensing tube 116, disrupting the flow ot' 'vapor to the piston 64 and resulting in theV 4creation of a suilicient pressure diierential between opposite sides ofthe piston 64 to reutm the piston 64 to the position illustrated in FIG. 10, thereby releasing the member 55 and the pilot valve member 48, whereby it is returned to its original position, illustrated in FIG. 10, under .the action of the spring 58. Upon the return of the valve member 48 to the position illustrated inFIG. 10, the passageway 88 is disconnected from the passageway 85 and the-latter operatively connected to the passageway 89 down stream of the valve member 2 6.

The right hand face of the piston 35, which prior to such movement of the valve member 48 had fluid bearing thereagainst at the vinternal fluid pressure in the nozzle structure, is now permitted to vflow downstreamof the valve member 26, thereby returning such side of'the pis'- ton to atmospheric pressure and thus creating a pressure v differential-on the piston 35, tendingtomove the latter to the right and thus supplementing the actionof the spring 46. The valve 26 will thus` be returned to its closed position as illustrated in-FIG. 10.

`If the nozzle: isin open position'as illustrated'in FIG. l1 andl for,any reason itis desiredto. manually` shutoff the flow through the nozzle,.this may be readily accomplished by pressure on the button 79 to move the same to the left as vvieweid 'in=FIG. 11,- resulting in a corresponding movement'of the diphragm piston 64 until the links 71 and 73 have pivotedsuficiently to disengage the member 55 and' permit the valve member 48 -to returnto its original position, .as illustrated in FIG. 10, following which the closure action will take `place in the samemanner as just described under automatic operation.

` It will be apparentthat the construction provides an inherent snubbing or damping action on the movement-of the valve `member. 26, resulting fromthe. restriction of liquid ilow through the passageways controlling the pressure differentials on the piston 35. Thus, in opening operations,'the liquid draining through the passageways 84, 85 86 and188 will owat a vrelatively low rate, dependinglupon the effective size of such passageways, thereby restrictingA the speed at which the.valve 26 will move to an open position, and resulting in avery smooth ilow transition .in the supply line: Likewise, in closing operations, the ow of liquid in the` vinterior 81 of the nozzle through the passageways 82, 84, 85 .and 86 to thepiston 35, will be restricted whereby the pressure buildup on the piston will take .place smoothly and gradually, and the valve closure will similarly take place withoutundue shock loads and hammering in the supply lines,l Mqdiyeaforlm ofFlGs.l 1 2-16 The constructionillustrated in FIGS. 12 to 16 is generally similar to `the construction of..FIGS. l'to 11er'nploying a master valve member for controllingthe iluid ilow, which, in turn; Vis `controlled by a manually actuatable pilot valve member. The latter controlsthe flow of duid to hydraulically operated means for opening or closing the master valve memberv and also employs a sensing system which is operable to actuateA the pilot valve when the liquid in the tank being filled lhas reached a predetermined level. Likewise, means is provided for manually shutting the master valvel member and for preventing undesired operation when the nozzle is not connected to' a suitable iiller inlet fitting.

Geneml construction Referring to FIGS. 12 to 16 of the drawings, in which the same reference numerals are used as employed in FIGS. 1 to 11 to designate substantially like parts and primed reference numerals are utilized to designate corresponding parts to those illustrated inFIGS. `l to ll', C

but of modified shape or construction, the modified formof the invention employs a main body member 1',

having an internally threaded tubular portion 2', to which the free `encl of the tluid supply line is adapted to be operatively connected, and having a generally tubular-shaped extension or nose piece 3' secured to the body member 1' by screws 4', a gasket 5' being interposed between the opposing'surfaces of lthe members. The member 3' is constructed in two pieces 3a and 3b, the latter being illustrated as constructed of semi-resilient material such as rubber or the like, and'is provided witha ilange 106'l f which'functions as the sealing gasket (corresponding to the gasket 106) when 'the nozzle is coupled to a filler 'I inlet such as that illustrated in FIG. 2, the section 3b being attached to the section 3a by an annular retaining ring 125 secured to the section 3a bya plurality of .radially extending, circumferentially spacedscrews 126. l

The coupling member 6' ismounted on the extension 3' and provided'with suitable handle members 8', illus- Y trated as being formedv from sheet vmetal, and secured to outwardly extending lugs formed on the member 6' by rivets or other suitable fastening means 7'. The coupler assembly comprising the sleeve 6' and handles 8 is biased I .body member 1' by `a plurality of cap screws 1'5'.

The liquid outlet 16' at the outlet end of the main body member 1' isprovidedwith a counterboreforrecess 126 therein in which is disposed the gasket member 3', the inner edge 17'1of which forms the annular valve seat for the main valve member 26'. The sealing ring 33 is retained in operative position by an annular-shaped member 128 .disposed between the sealing ring33' and the adjacent end face of the section 3a.

In this construction the sensing tube 21' is anchored to the member 11' by engaging externally formed threads on the tube 21' with mating threads formed in a co- 'ope'rablejborein' the member 11', the tubebeing locked in position by a suitable retaining washer or nut 22', also threaded on the tube, witha suitable sealing gasket 129 being interposed between the nut 22' and the adjacent face of the member 11'.

being formed of semi-resilient material similar tothat employed in the portion 3b.of the nose piece 3" and secured to the tubing 21 by a hollow litting 131 having opposite directed'stem Aportions 132 and 133, the former retain the same in operative position.

.I The hollow valve stem 25' is provided at its freer outer end with'the valve member 26', which is clamped to the valve stem 25 between ashoulder 134 formed anda lock nut 135 threaded on the free-end of the valve Secured to the opposite .end of the The outerend of the tube21' is provided with a tubular nose piece 24 illustrated as thereon stem. The piston 35' is secured to the opposite end of the valve stem 25', the piston being clamped between the shoulder 45 formed on the valve stem and a lock nut 44' threaded on the stem, the gasket 138 being disposed between the piston 135 and the nut 44'. In this embodiment, the piston 35' is illustrated as -being formed from sheet material instead of solid stock as illustrated in FIG. 1. The piston 35 is operatively sealed with respect to the tubular cylinder liner 38 by a generally tubular-shaped diaphragm 39 which is disposed between the piston 35 and the cap member 36 and is provided with an annular enlargement 42 which is seated in an annularv shaped recess in the body member 1' and abuts the adjacent end of the liner 38. The sealing diaphragm 41 is omitted in this construction and the opposite end of the cylinder liner 38 is sealed by an annular-shaped ring 43 which is disposed between the adjacent end of the cylinder liner and face of the member 11'.

` The valve member 26' is urged to the right by the lcompression spring 46, bearing at one end on the cap compression. As in the case of the first construction described, the valve member 26' will normally be engaged withithe sealing ring 33' under the action of the internal fluid pressure' acting-upon the larger area of the piston 35', supplemented by the action of the spring 46,.

, Valve control mechanism In the construction illustrated in FIGS. '12 to 16 the pilot valve member 48' is disposed in a bore 47' which is is located in a longitudinally extending member which is secured to the top of the body member 1 by aiplurality of screws 145 threaded into the body member 1', a gasket 146 being disposed between the body member 1' and the top member 10. The pilot valve member 48 is provided-with three radially extending flange portions 49, 51 and 52, corresponding to the like portions on the valve member 48, with the exception that the portions 49 and 52 are reversely positioned in spaced relation with respect to the portion 1. Each of such'ange portions is provided with the O-ring 53 and in this particular embodiment of the invention the sealing'rings 53 are disposed within a sleeve-'member 147 which is made of suitable material to provide efficient and long wearing sealing action between the O-rings and the sleeve member. As will be apparent from a reference to FIG. 12, the ends of sleeve 147 abuts the gasket 5 and a disk-shaped gasket member 148 which provide an effective seal between theends of the sleeve and the member 10.

The rightuhand end of the valve member 48', as viewed in FIG. 12, is provided with a cylindrical Iitting 54 formed with an annular outwardly extending ange or abutment 55', the member 54' being secured in operative position on the valve member 48' by a knob or button 59 which is illustrated as being threaded upon theend of the valve member and rigidly secured in position by a diametrically extendingvpin 149.

"The valve member is normally biased in a direction to the right as viewed in FIG. 12 by the compression spring 58 and is adapted to be moved to the left against the action of such spring by the manual application of force to the knob or button 59'.

ln this construction the control or diaphragm piutou 64 und piston cup or platt; 65 i. net-tired tu n ltil'tlrtatird block 67 which is provided with :t threaded shunt. |51 on which is threaded a nut 152, the diaphragm 63 being disposed at one end between the piston 64 and cap member 65 and at the opposite end between the members 11 and 12'.

Pivotally mounted at one end to the member 12, by means of a pin 69, is a single latehing member 73 which is fabricated from strip spring stock and formed at one end with an eye through which the pin 69 extends, and at its opposite end is folded back on itself to provide an enlarged head 153 thereat which is adapted to-engage the annular shoulder 55 on the member 54'. The upper end of the member 73' is guided by a pin 154, while the intermediate portion of the member 73', as illustrated inl FIGS. l2 and 13, extends between the bifurcated portions of the block 67' as does the portion 155 of the button 79'. The latter is secured to the block 67' by a pin 156 which extends through the bifurcated portions of the block 67 and the portion 155 of the button 79'. The piston 64 thus is guided by the button 79 and the diaphragm 63.

It will be noted that when the valve 48' is in the position as illustrated in FIG. l2 the spring member 73 will be in a bowed relation, straightening of the member being rprevented by engagement of the upper end 153 thereof with the member 54', as illustrated in FIG. 12, and in such position the piston 64 will be at or near its extreme left hand position as viewed in FIG. 12. However, when the valve member 4S is moved to its extreme left hand position, as illustrated in FIG.13, the member 73 may straighten out, as illustrated, thereby drawing the piston 64 outwardlywith it and at the same time the head 153 of the member 73' will engage the annular shoulder 55',

thereby forming a latch which will retain the valve member48' in its left hand or actuated' position. The membe'r 73 thus serves two purposes, taking the place of the links 71 ad 73 of the construction ot FIG. 1, and at the lsame time takes the place of the spring 78 operative in the construction lof FIG. l to urge the piston 64 to the right. t

Thus, under predetermincd conditions, the button 59 may be pushed inwardly to actuate the pilot valve member 48 to the positionkillustrated in FIG. 13, and in the event the piston 64 is drawn to the left as viewed in FIG. 13, the member 73 will be flexed out of engage- Ument with the flange permitting the spring 58 to return the pilot valve member to its original position illustrated in FIG. 12. The piston 64 may thus be automatically actuated in the same manner as heretofore described with respect to the piston 64, or the valve member 48 may be manually released from its position illustrated in FIG. 13 by moving the button 79' inwardly until the upper end of the link 73 is disengaged from the annular shoulder 55.

Hydraulic connections of the control mechanism Referring to FIG. 13v through 15, it will be noted that the left hand face of the piston 35 it subject to the internal tluid pressure in the nozzle, the liquid being free to tlow from the interior 81 of the nozzle to the piston through the opening or bore 82. As described in connection with the structure illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 9, the opposite side of the piston 35' is adapted to be operatively connected through the pilot valve 48' with either they interior 81 of the nozzle structure, whereby the internal liuid pressure would be applied to both sides of the piston 35, or connected to the discharge side of the nozzle down stream of the valve member 26', whereby internal pressure at the right hand side of the piston 35 may be relieved to the atmosphere.

However, in this construction the passages to and from the pilot valve member 48 as well as the passageway to thc diaphragm piston 64 are formed in the top member 10,.':ttt`h pzmnnpif'; tiring readily ltirmrtl in Iltr lmlltm faro nt the latter in tlm f-.hapv it hmgitudmtilty exten-ling grooves lather than boten.

Thus, the right hand aide of the piston 35 is operapassagew'ays 84, 85 vand 86.

is tively connected to the interior of the bore 47' by a longitudinally extending 'passageway' 85 which is operatively connected at its right hand or rear end to the interior i and 93h by transversely extending passageways 16 7a and of Lthel cylinder sleeve 38' and thus the right hand side of the piston 35', by a connecting port or bore 86, and at its opposite end to the interior of the bore 47 by a transversely extending passageway 84, the inner end of which extends-upwardly to intersect the bore 47'. In like manner the latter is adapted to be operatively connected to the interior of the ,extension member 3 down stream of the valve seat 17' by a longitudinally extending passageway 89 Vis connected lby an` angularlyy extending passageway 89a disposed in the extension member 3' as illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. All of the passageways 84, 85, 89 and 91 are formed by grooves or channels in the bottom face of the top member with o nly thepassageways 86, 89a

' and the portions of the passageways 84 and 91 intersecting the bore 47 beng'formed as apertures 167b disposed at opposite sides of the valve member 161.

The valve member 161 is provided with la p lilrality of ports 168 therein. through which fluid and vapor may pass from the passageway 1671i to the pasasgeway 167a wh'en i --the valve member is in its closed position in engagement with the seat 162 and when the valve memberis in its open position as illustrated in FIG. 1,3, fluid and vapor may 'freely flow from the passageway 167b to the passageway 167a.

Thus, under normal operating conditions when the fluid flow through the nozzle is relatively low, creating a relatively low pressure on the diaphragm piston 6,4', the valve member `161 will remain in its operi` position 'permitting full flow therethrough, but in the event high ow rates are involved through the nozzleand an excessive pressure drop would be created at the'diaphragm piston 64', such relatively high pressure drop will create a pressure differential on the valve 161, resultingiin closure thereof and limiting the vapor flow to that passing through the ports The interior 81-of the body member 1 is also opera- I tively connected with the bore 47' by a borel 88 and the i y intersection of the latter with the bore 47' as well as the intersections ofthe passages 84 and 91 therewith are so v disposed with respect to the portions of the bore 47 de,

fined between the O-rings 53 that the ow of fluid to and from the right side of the piston 35 is controlled by the position of the pilot valve 48'.. Thus when such valve member is in the position illustrated in FIG.A12 the passageway 89e at the down stream side ofthe valve memb'er 26' is operatively `connected to the'int'erior of the cylindersleeve V38', andthe right hand side of the piston througl1 passageways 89a, 89, 91,y bore 47', passageways 84,' 85 an`d`86. However, whenthe valvemember 48 lis in the position illustratedV in FIG. 13, connection between the interior-81 'of the body member and the Ainterior ofthe cylinder sleeve 38' at the right end thereof is completed through the passageway 88, bore and The construction illustrated in FIGS. 12 to 'V16 provided with .venturi orificesor ports 158 illustrated as being disposed ninety degrees apart as will bev aparent from a reference tolFIGS.` 12 and 14, the body member 1' being provided with an annular recess or groove 159 therein vwhich operativelyconnects the inner ends of the passageways 158 formed in `the annular shaped member 128; The'annular groove 159-is adapted to be operatively` connected to the left side' ofthe diaphragm piston 64' 'by a pair of aligned", longitudinallyextending passageways 93a andv 93b which are disposedin theform of channels inithe bottom face of the top member 10, the passageway 93a being'connected at its .adjacent end with the annular passageway. 159 by a bore 94, and the adjacent end of the passageway 93b being operatively connected to the left side of the diaphragm piston 64' by a bore 95.A `While the `passageways 93a and-'93b could be connected to corref spend to the pasa'geway 93 of the construction illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 9, which construction could be employed in they embodiment ofv the invention illustrated in FIG.' 12, FIGS. 13,' 14 and l15 illustrate-an additional lmodification wherein means is provided for-controlling fluid'or vapor owfthrough the .passageways93a and 93b. Such means comprises a'valve lmember 161 vwhich is axially movable and biased with respect to its valve seat 162 in a normally open position. Asillustrated in FIG. 13, the'top'member `10'is provided with an enlargement or'projection 163 i Nozzle coupling structure The nozzle illustrated in FIGS. 12 to 16 is adapted to be connected to the identical `type of tank fitting illustrated .neetion between the fitting 104` and the tube 21. Likewise, the coupling-member 6' is provided wthfcorresponding locking lugs 108 and adapted to be engaged with the inlet fitting by a quarter turn of the coupling -by member means of the handles 8'. v v

f In this construction, the pilot valve 48,cannot be actu- -ated from a valve closing position to a valve opening position unlessthe nozzle is coupled to the supply tank fitting as the adjacent end of the coupling sleeve 6' restricts opening movement of the valve member 48' when the coupling is disconnected and the parts are as illustrated in FIG. 12. g

However, when the nozzle -is coupled to the supply tank fitting, the coupling sleeve 6' will. be,.axially moved to apositionwth respectl to the valve member 48' as illustrated in-FIG. 13, thereby freeing the valve member for movement to an open position such as illustrated in FIG. 13. is .not locked to the tank fitting whereby uncoupling is prevented unless the valve member 48 is in its valve closing position. Instead, the construction is such that in the event the 'coupling sleeve 6' is disconnected from the tank fitting, it will be returned by the spring 9 to the position illustratedin FIG. 12, such movement resultingin engagement :of the sleeve with the exposed enclv of. the valve member 48 and movement of the latter to its nozzle closing position. Thus, disconnection of the nozzle from the tank fitting during flow ltherethrough will automatil cally close the nozzle before it can be withdrawn from the tank fitting.

Operation The operation of the construction illustrated' in FIGS. l

12- to 16 is generally identical with -that heretofore described-with respect to the construction of FIGS. 1 to 9 with thel exception that the travel ofthe pilot valve mem- -ber`48 is reversed. Thus, assuming that the nozzle isin connected by a portion 'of the bore 47' disposed between the O-rings carried by the portions 51 and 53. Under such conditions the right hand side of the piston 35' is operatively connected to atmospheric pressure throughthe passageway 89a which opens on the downstream side of the valve seat 17 and the left side of the piston is sub- In this construction, the coupling member 6' position as such movement is restricted by the adjacent abutting face of the coupling sleeve 6'. Consequently the valve member 26is maintained in its closed position in sealing engagement with the sealing ring 33.

Following coupling of the nozzle to a tank fitting such as that illustrated in FIG. 2, the tubular member 114 defining the end of the sensing tube, 116 will be operatively engaged with the nose piece 24 to operatively connect the left side of the piston diaphragm 64' with the interior of the receiving tank, at a point determined by the inner end of the tube 116.

Upon the application of pressure to the start button 59', the valve member 48' may be moved to the position illustrated in FIG. 13, whereby the right side of the piston 35' is operatively connected with the interior 81 of the nozzle permitting the liuid therein to ow through the passageway 88, passageway 84 and associated passagervays to the right side of the piston 35', thereby equalizing the pressures on such piston resulting in the creation of a pressure differential on the yvalve member 26' tending to move it to the left, to an open position such as illustrated in FIG. 13, in opposition to the spring 46. As fluid flows out of the nozzle, a reduced pressure will be developed in the venturi ports 158 and associated connecting passages tothe left s'ide of the diaphragm piston 64', but as the sensing tube 116 and tube 21 operatively connect the interior of the receiving tankkwith the chamber at the left side ofthe diaphragm piston, fluid and vapor may be drawn from the tank interior, thereby maintaining an equalization of the forces tending to act upon the piston 64. v l

Fluid thus flows until the liquid level in the receiving tank reaches the 'point where it at least momentarily closes the adjacent endv of the sensing tube 116, thereby restricting vapor flow through the sensing tube 116 and tube 21', such action upsetting the equilibrium of the forces acting on thepiston 64' and resulting in the creation of a pressure differential on thepiston 64 whereby the forces acting thereon will move the same to the position illustrated in FIG. 16, drawing the upper end of the spring member 73' out of engagement with the shoulder 55" on the 4member 54' and permitting the spring'58-to return the pilot valve member 48' to lits original position illustrated in FIG. 12. Upon return of the'pilot valve member 48 to the position illustrated in FIG. 12, the passagewayr88 will again be closed and the right hand side of the piston 35' will be operatively connected to the passageway 89a, thereby relieving the fiuid pressures on the right side of the piston 35', again creating a pressure differential on the piston which in conjunction with the forces of the spring 46 will return the' valve member 26 to its closed position illustrated in FIG. 12.

Throughout the filling, the pressures acting upon the diaphragm piston 64 will be controlled by the valve member 161, the latter remaining open as long as the flow rates are such that an excessive differential is notbuilt up on the piston 64', and in the event an excessive differential would be built up asv a result of increased flow, the valve 161 would close and limit the volume of vapor which may pass through the sensing system.

If, during operation, it is desired to manually shut off the nozzle prior to the filling of the tank this may be readily accomplished by the application of force to the button 79 which will fiex the spring member 73', moving the piston 64' and associated structure to the left as viewed in FIG. 13 until the upper end 153 of the member 73 is disengaged from the member 54 thus permitting the pilot valve member 48 to return to its original position.

It will bc noted that in both of the constructions illustrated, the valve member 26 or 26 is shaped to provide a variable venturi action tending to eliminate wide fiuctuation in the developed pressure differential andl which in the case of extremely high ow rates may be supplemented by the additional control valve mechanism including the valve 161.

In the event the valve 161 is omitted, the passageways 93a and 93b would be operatively connected to form a single passageway. In such casethe top member 10 may be formed as illustrated in FIG. 12.

Likewise it will be apparent from the above description that I have provided a novel arrangement whereby un- 1 desired operation and discharge of liquid from the nozzle is prevented other than when the nozzle structure is operatively coupled to a receiving tank inlet fitting, the construction of FIGS. 1 to 9 preventing disconnection of the nozzle structure from such a fitting unless the nozzle is closed, and in the construction of FIGS. 12 to 16, disconnection of the nozzle from the supply fitting will result in automatic closure of the nozzle. Likewise both forms embody means for manually controlling the operation of the nozzle structure, and provide a visual indication of the operation of the nozzle, the first form by the location of the member 56 which will be in its forward position if the structure is in closed position, and in its rear position if the structure is in open position. Similarly with respect to the second form, as indicated by the position of the button 59', which will be depressed if the valve is open, and extended if the valve is closed.

It will also be'noted that the construction is such that it readily adaptsl itself to existing tank fittings which are constructed substantially as illustrated in FIG. 2 with the exception of the sensing tube 116 and yoke or spider 112. Thus in such cases the tank may be readily adapted for automatic operation with the'nozzle structure illustrated by merely adding the sensing tube 1,16 and spider structure 112, which, in'thecase of the fitting illustrated, may be readily accomplished by removing the ame arresting screen 109 and either adding the required components or substituting a new screen containing the same for that removed. Such construction also permits the use of the nozzle on existing structures which do not include the sensing tube 116 and associated structure, eliminating the advantage ofA the-automatic operation, but permitting filling under the manual control of the operator.

Having thus described my invention, it will be obvious 'to those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein given that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention;V hence, I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described or uses mentioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a filler nozzle for .widely varying flow rates, the combination of a nozzle body having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet therein, said liquid outlet -being shaped to form a venturi throat, a sensing tube extending concentrically with the liquid outlet with said tube extending therethrough to adjacent the discharge end of the nozzle, means'for rigidly supporting the innerA end of said tube from saidnozzle body, a master valve member slidable on said sensing tube and including a closure member operatively engageable with the liquid outlet to close the nozzle, means resiliently biasing said master valve member in a closed position, said master valve member having a piston connected therewith operatively disposed in a cooperable cylinder bore formed in s'aid body, means for effecting a fluid seal between said piston and said cylinder, one side of said piston being exposed tothe internal liquid pressure in said nozzle body, an elongated control valve member axially'movable on an axis extending parallel to the axis of said master valve member, said nozzle body having fluid passages therein opeartively connecting said l with the opposite side of said piston, said control' valve,

memberbeing operative in one position to operatively l connectfsaid opposite side of said piston with the vinterior of said nozzle body and the vliquid therein under pressure,

and in the other position to connect such opposite side to the discharge end vof the nozzle down stream of said outlet and permit drainage from said cylinder at said opposite side of the piston, means for resiliently biasing said control valve member in valve closing position, -a diaphragm piston operatively disposed 'for communication at one `side vwith the inner end of said sensing tube and at the other side with atmospheric pressure, means operatively connecting said diaphragm piston and said controlvalve member for operatively latching the latter i'n valve opening position, means for manually effecting movement of said control valve member to valve opening position, said nozzle -body having apassage extending from said diaphragm piston at the side thereof in communication wit-hsaid sensing tube to said venturithroat, whereby liquid flow throughthe latter tends to create a pressure reduction in said passage and at the control piston operative to produce a vapor flow through said sensing tube and operative upon discontinuance of said vapor flow to crcate'a pressure differential on said diaphragm piston operative to move the latter to a position releasing said controlV valve member and thereby effecting closure of said master valve mem-ber. v 2. A filler nozzle as defined in claim 1, wherein said means operatively connecting said diaphragm piston with 'said control valve member comprises a toggle 'linkage `pivotedat one end to said body and selectively engageable at the-opposite end'in latching relation v4with said control valve mem'ber', said toggle'liiikage -beingioperatively connectedat` an :intermediate point to` said diaphragm piston-whereby movement of t-he latter in revsponse to a developed pressure differential thereon is operative toA move said toggle linkage' to an unlat'ching position with respect to said control valve member.

3. A filler nozzle as defined in claim 1, wherein said means operatively connecting said diaphragm piston with saidcontrol valve member comprises a resilient llink pivoted at one end to said body and selectively engageable at the vother end in latching relation with said control valve member, said link beingV operatively connected vat an intermediate point to said diaphragm piston whereby movement of the latter inresponse to a developed pressure differential' thereon is operative toy move said link to an unlatching position with respect to said control valve member. v f

4; A filler nozzle as defined in claim l, wherein said nozzle' is provided-with means for coupling the latter to a fluid inlet fitting through which fluid is tol be discharged, and cooperable means associated with said control'valve means and said coupling means for preventing disconnection of said 4coupling means from such a fitting when vsaid control valve=member is in a valve opening position.

S. A filler nozzle as defined inclaim 1, wherein said nozzle isl provided with means for coupling the latter to a fluid inlet fitting'throughwhich lfluid is to be discharged, and"elooperable means associated withsaid control valve 'memberl and said coupling means r'for Vpreventing movement of said control valve member to valve opening position when said coupling means is disengaged from a supply fitting. l

6.' A filler nozzle as defined in claim 5, wherein sa'id control'valve member is provided with 'an extension adapted to be disposed in thepath of said coupling means whereby movement of the latterfrom coupling to uncoupling position is operative to movcsaid control valve member to a valve closing position. l

` 7. A filler nozzle as defined in claim 1 comprisingin combination therewith a supply fitting having meansco bly for controlling the hydraulic operation of said lmaster nozzle to saidsupply fitting, said supply fitting including a fla-me arresting screen operatively interposed between the mouthof said fitting and the interior of a container ment with the lfree end of the sensing tube carried by said nozzle, and the opposite end of said sensing tube at the opposite side of saidscreen .being disposed for positioning at the liquid level desired in such a container at which closure of the nozzle is to be effected.

8. A` filler nozzle as defined inclaim 1, comprising in combination therewith, a valve member operatively interposed in the passage between said diaphragm piston and said venturi t-hroat, means for biasing said last mentioned valve member in an open position, the latter being movable to a closed position in response to an excessive presure differential on opposite sides thereof, operative to reduce the effective pressure differential on said diaphragm piston during liquid flow through the nozzle at relatively high flow rates.

v9. A ller nozzle for widely varying flow rates cornprising a nozzle'body and a master valve member oper.- able to control the fluid flow through the nozzle fbody, hydraulically actuated means for opening and closing said valve member, a manually controllable pilot valve assemvalve member, coupling means on said filler nozzle for coupling the filler nozzle in fluid tight relation to a fluid inlet fitting through which fluid is to be discharged, co-

operable means associated with said pilot valve assembly and said coupling means for preventing discharge'through said filler nozzle when disconnected from said fluid inlet fitting, .said cooperable 'meanslas'sociated with said :pilot valveassembly and vsaid coupling `means comprising a latching member and a springimembcr operatively engageable lwith said pilot valve assembly and adapted to be moved by thepilot valve assembly when the same is actuated to rvalve opening position, said latching member ibeing disposed when in its movedposition to restrict disengaging movement of said coupling means from said fluid inlet fitting, and in `its normal vposition restricting move- -ment of said master valve mem-ber when'the coupling means is disengaged from said fluid inlet fitting, andsaid pilot'valve assembly, when in valve opening position, being disposed in the `path of and operatively engageable with said coupling means when the coupling means is in disconnected position operative to move said pilot valve assembly to valve closing position and normally retain the pilot valve assembly in its closed position.

v10. A filler nozzle for widely varying flow rates comprising a nozzle body having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet therein, said liquid outlet being shaped to form a venturi throat, a sensing tube extending concentrically with a liquid outlet with said tube extending therethrough nected therewith operatively disposedy in a coopera-ble cylinder bore `formed in said body, means for effecting a fluid seal between said piston and said cylinder, one side of said .piston being exposed to the internal liquid pressure in said nozzle body, an elongated control valve member axially movable on an axis extending parallel to the axis of said master valve member, said nozzle body having fluid passages therein operatively connecting said lcontrol valve member with the nozzle interior to the discharge end of said nozzle downstream of--said outlet and with the opposite side of said piston, said control valve member being operative in one position'to operatively and in the other position to connect such opposite side to the discharge end of the nozzle downstream of vsaid outlet and permit drainage from said cylinder at said opposite side of the piston, means for resiliently biasing said control valve member in valve closing position, a diaphragm piston operatively disposed for communication at one side with t-he inner end of said sensing tube and at the other side with atmospheric pressure, means operatively connecting said diaphragm piston and said control valve member for operatively latching the latter in valve opening position, means for manually effecting movement of said control valve member to valve opening position, said nozzle body including connecting passages for said control valvevmember extending from said diaphragm piston at the side thereof in communication with said sensing tube to said venturi throat, whereby liquid ow through the latter tends to'create a pressure reduction in said passages and at the control piston operative to produce a vapor ow through said sensing `tube and operative upon discontinuance of said vapor flow to create a pressure differential on said diaphragm piston operative to move` ter valve member, and said closure member of said master valve member provided with an external shape which is cooperable with said venturi throat to provide a variable orifice which is adjustable in response to changes in the .position of said master valve member relative to said liquid outlet.

11. A filler'nozzle for widely varying ow rates comprising a master valve member operable to control the uid ow through the nozzle, hydraulically, actuated means for opening and closing said master valve member, a manually controllable pilot valve assembly for controlling the hydraulic operation of said master valve mem'ber, means for automatically actuating said pilot valve assembly to effect closure of said master valve member when the liquid in a tank being filled reaches a predetermined level, means for varying the action of said means for automatically actuating said pilot valve assembly for variations in the flow rate through-the nozzle, said means for automatically actuating said pilot valve assembly including a pressure differentially actuated structure operatively connected to said pilot valve assembly, a supply fitting to which said nozzle may be coupled, said fitting including a flame arresting screen operatively interposed between the mouth of said fitting and the interior of a container on which the fitting may be mounted, sensing means extending from the interior side of said screen to adjacent the mouth of said supply fitting constructed for operative connection to said nozzle` for sensing a predetermined liquid level in said container, means on said nozzle for operatively con-4 nectin g said sensing means to said means for automatically actuating said pilot valve assembly, said means for automatically actuating said manually controllable pilot valve assembly to effect closure of the master valve member constructed to provide a restrictive action on the master vvalve member operative to prevent excessively rapid openmg and closing movements of said master valve member,

for opening and closing said master valve member to prevent excessively rapid opening and closing movements of said master valve member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,840,122 6/58 Klikunus et al. 141-207 2,929,417 3,/ Mosher 141-221 3,033,246 5/62 Civerolo 141-208 3,055,405. 9/ 62 Pase 141-207 3,086,565 4/63 Mosher 141-347 LAvERNE DQGEIGER, Primm Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2840122 *Oct 5, 1956Jun 24, 1958Buckeye Iron & Brass WorksLocomotive tank filling nozzle
US2929417 *Mar 18, 1957Mar 22, 1960Schulz Tool & Mfg CoTransfer equipment for volatile liquids
US3033246 *Sep 1, 1959May 8, 1962Texaco IncSafety device for holding control valve in open position during filling operation
US3055405 *Jun 23, 1959Sep 25, 1962Houston CompanyAutomatic tank-filling systems
US3086565 *May 14, 1959Apr 23, 1963Schulz Tool & Mfg CoServicing nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4454896 *Sep 14, 1982Jun 19, 1984Barrett Jr James HAutomatic battery water filler
US4919174 *Apr 10, 1987Apr 24, 1990Warland John RFilling means
US5435356 *Jun 14, 1994Jul 25, 1995Rabinovich; Joshua E.Vapor recovery nozzle
US6622760 *Nov 29, 2001Sep 23, 2003Julie Elizabeth CliftonFueling nozzle
US7588060 *Sep 21, 2005Sep 15, 2009Flomax International, Inc.Apparatus, system, and means for a modular backpressure sensor
US8316900Jul 2, 2009Nov 27, 2012Flomax International, Inc.Fluid receiver having removable sleeve
US8899284Nov 16, 2012Dec 2, 2014Flomax International, Inc.Fluid receiver having removable sleeve
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/208, 251/52, 141/217, 141/385
International ClassificationB64D39/00, B64D39/06
Cooperative ClassificationB64D39/06
European ClassificationB64D39/06