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Publication numberUS3209369 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1965
Filing dateSep 28, 1962
Priority dateSep 28, 1962
Publication numberUS 3209369 A, US 3209369A, US-A-3209369, US3209369 A, US3209369A
InventorsTredway Jean K
Original AssigneeTredway Jean K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-design hat
US 3209369 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. K. TREDWAY MULTI-DESIGN HAT Oct. 5, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed ESepl'.. 28, 1962 50 F/g. 5 @L 49 F fg. 4

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Oct. 5, 1965 J. K. TREDWAY MULTI-DESIGN HAT 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 28, 1962 Rm, m E mm qm N M o wf in mm man d N @d m". l J e v.. B

Oct. 5, 1965 J. K. TREDWAY 3,209,369

MULTI-DESIGN HAT Filed Sept. 28, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. Jenn K. Tnnowny H TToz/vEyS J. K. TREDWAY MULTI-DESIGN HAT Oct. 5, 1965 Filed` Sept. 28 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. Jann K. Tnaownv /ma, @ya aL gea/ HTToRNEys Oct. 5, 1965 J. K. TREDWAY MULTI-DESIGN HAT 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 28, 1962 Fig. /9

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United States Patent 3,209,369 MULTI-DESIGN HAT .I een K. Tredway, 7005 Carriage Hiil Drive, Brecksville, Ohio Filed Sept. 28, 1962, Ser. No. 226,976 2 Claims. (C1. 2198) This invention relates to wearing apparel and more particularly to a fabric panel which can be transformed into a variety of hat designs.

It is known that women, including girls of high school and college age, desire to have articles of wearing apparel through which they can express their individual creative Hare.

It is also known that women desire to change the style of hat which they Wear. Generally, the change is made by purchasing a new hat or changing a basic hat by sewing. Where changes were made by sewing, the changes required a great deal of skill, were time consuming, and the original shape was often destroyed.

An object of the present invention is to provide a basic fabric unit which is designed for and invites changeability of head wear styles.

A further object is to provide a basic fabric unit and associated fastening means which can be combined with other similar units to form a variety of attractive hats which could not be formed by the use of a single unit.

A further object is to provide a basic fabric unit and fastening means which, singly or in combination with other fabric units, can rapidly be changed from one hat design or style to another, with the original design, or any other previously attempted designs being readily restored without the need of special skills such as sewing.

A further object is to accomplish the foregoing objects as simply and inexpensively as possible.

Briefly, the invention consists of the use of one or more elongated fabric panels, strap positioning means and one or more associated straps.

By changing the strap into a variety of positions relative to the retention means and sometimes, folding portions of the panel, and at times combining the panels, a wide assortment of attractive hat designs can be created.

Referring now to the drawings:

FIG. 1 shows a preferred panel shape;

FIG. 2 shows the panel of FIG. 1 with a strap inserted through the transversely aligned positioning means;

FIG. 3 is a rear View of the panel and strap arrangement of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view of the panel of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an end View of the panel arrangement of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 shows the panel of FIG. 1 with a strap passing through the longitudinally disposed positioning means of one end of the panel;

FIG. 7 is a section along lines 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 shows one of the hat styles which can be formed by combining the panel of FIG. 1 with an associated strap means;

FIG. 9 shows another hat style;

FIG. 10 shows a further hat style;

FIG. 11 shows a hat style which can be made by combining four panels and one strap;

FIG. 12 shows a hat made from two panels and one strap;

FIG. 13 is a side View of the hat of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 shows the method of assembly of the hat of FIG. 11;

FIG. 15 shows a combination collar and vest made from three panels and two straps;

FIG. 16 shows the panel of FIG. 1,

with centrally disposed positioning means added;

3,299,369 Patented Oct. 5, 1965 ICC FIG. 17 is an end view illustrating a method of combining three panels and one strap to form a rutile;

FIG. 18 shows the rutile of FIG. 17, placed on the head of a wearer with a fourth panel serving to hold the rutile in place;

FIG. 19 shows a panel with hexagonal positioning means;

FIG. 20 shows a panel with rounded ends;

FIG. 21 shows a strap making a 90 change in direction by passing through both the longitudinally and transversely disposed positioning means;

FIG. 22 illustrates three panels held together by fastening means.

Referring again to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a preferred form of the invention. The basic unit shown is a fabric panel 25 which is substantially longer than it is wide and has positioning means adjacent each end. The positioning means shown in the preferred embodiment include a rst set of positioning members in the form of substantially transversely aligned slits or button holes 30, 31, 32 and 33 adjacent each end 28 and 29. One pair of transversely aligned, spaced, button holes 30 and 31 are located adjacent one end 28 of the panel and another pair of transversely aligned, spaced, button holes 32 and 33 are located adjacent the other end 29. The centers 34 and 35 of the button holes of the first set of positioning members are shown olf-set from the longitudinal central axis 36 of the panel. The first set of positioning members, may be located adjacent to and slightly inwardly of the ends 28 and 29 so that the material between the first set of positioning members and the respective adjacent panel ends forms a pair of lobes 39 and 40.

The preferred panel shown in FIG. 1, also has a pair of second positioning members located adjacent the first positioning members and at right angles thereto. The second positioning members shown include a pair of substantially longitudinally aligned, spaced, button holes 43 and 44 located at right angles to the transverse button holes 30 and 31, and a pair of longitudinally aligned, spaced, button holes 45 and 46 located at right angles to the transverse button holes 32 and 33. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the longitudinal and transverse adjacent each end are arranged in the form of the letter I so that the transverse centers 37 and 38 bisect the longitudinal centers 34 and 35.

It is preferred that the panel be thin, limp, and suiiiciently iiexible that it is capable of lying flat of its own weight, when placed on a plane surface as shown in the elevation View of FIG. 4, rather than being preformed or preshaped as is the Iordinary hat. It is also preferred that the panel have sulicient stiffness that portions of the panel may be bent away from the general contour of the head of the wearer, when the panel is placed on the head, such as are lobes 39 and 40 of the hat of FIG. 8. The desired qualities may be obtained from two pieces 48 and 49 of twill, FIGS. 4, 5 and 7, cut straight rather than on the bias, with the pieces stitched together along the edges and ends to form the panel. The aforesaid button holes may then be cut in the panel with the edges of the button holes being stitched.

It is preferred that the ends 2S and 29 of the panel be pointed as shown in FIG. 1J and that the points 57 and 58 be olf-set from the longitudinal central axis 36. Moreover, it is preferred that the points be off-set on the same side `of the central axis 36 as are the centers 34 and 35 of the transversely aligned button holes. In the panel shown in FIG. 1, the side edges 60 and 61 are substantially parallel to the longitudinal central axis 36. The tapers 63 and 64 from the side edge 60, hereafter called the near side edge, which is the side edge on the same side of the longitudinal central axis 36 as the points 57 and 58, are shorter, more steep and commence nearer to the points 57 and 58 than do the tapers 65 and 66 from the far side edge 61.

At least one strap 50 is provided in the preferred form. The strap is removable and may be inserted longitudinally of the panel as shown in FIG. 2, or transversely as shown in FIG. 6, or in some instances, where more than one panel is utilized, the strap may be located both longitudinally and transversely of one of the panels as in the arrangement of FIG. 2l. The strap may occupy the entire length of the panel as shown in FIGS. 2 and 9 or only be adjacent one or more end portions as shown in FIGS. and 2l.

The positioning means shown frictionally holds the strap in place once the hat is in position on the head, but permits the strap to be slidable relative to the panel when preparing the particular style chosen by the wearer.

FIG. 2 shows th strap placed longitudinally of the panel. The longitudinal axis 51 of the strap is olf-set from the longitudinal central axis 36 of the panel due to the off-set feature of the centers 34 and 35 of the transversely aligned button holes 30, 31, 32 and 33. AS shown by FIG. 2, the parallel spaced relationship of the transverse button holes forms loops 53 and S4 through which the strap is slidable. The use of button holes to form the loops gives the advantage of reversibility since the same loop may be used on either one face 26 of the panel or on the other face 27, as shown by FIG. 3. It is to be understood that an equivalent of the button holes, such as loops sewn on the panel could be used. Moreover, the loops might be only on one side of the panel.

Since the strap may be used on either face of the panel and the panel is reversible, the panel has no inherent outside or inside face. For purposes of clarity in describing the various styles, the inside face shall refer to the face of the panel which is placed against the head of the wearer in a particular style arrangement and the outside face shall refer to the other or visible face.

One advantage of the invention is that a single panel and strap may be transformed into a variety of interesting and attractive shapes by the wearer. For example, take the design of FIG. l0. In forming the design the panel is placed on the crown of the head. One end tie 72 of the strap is then looped through the button holes 32 and 33 of the rst set of positioning members on the outside face of the panel as shown. The middle portion 7) of the strap passes under the chin of the wearer and over to the button holes and 31 of the irst set of positioning members adjacent the other end of the panel, where the end tie 71 is then looped through said button holes as shown to form a bow on the other side.

In another style, shown in FIG. 9, the panel 25 is placed across the front of the head, the strap is placed through the transverse button holes 30, 31, 32 and 33 (not shown in FIG. 9) so that the middle portion 70 of the strap lies longitudinally of the panel on the outside thereof such as it does in FIG. 2 except that the panel has taken on the curvature of the front of the head of the wearer. The end ties 71 and 72 of the strap are tied in the back of the head in a bow. Portions of the panel bordering on the front edge and adjacent lobes 39 and 40 `are then bent up to give the stylish ares 41 and 42 shown. In the style shown in FIG. 8, the panel is placed toward the front of the head as shown, the middle portion 70 of the strap is placed under the chin of the wearer, the end ties 71 and 72 of the strap are then passed through the longitudinally aligned button holes 43, 44, and 46 of the second set of positioning members and the end ties 71 and 72 then tied in a bow at the back of the head. The lobes 39 and 40 were then bent slightly outward from the head to give the Dutch girl effect.

Another feature of the invention is that the basic panel may be combined with additional panels as a building block arrangement to form hat styles which could not be formed by one panel alone. For example, two panels land one strap might be combined as shown in the front View of FIG. 12 and the side view of FIG. 13 to form a hat.

Two panels are placed with their ends overlapping so that one panel 78 is located towards the front of the head and another panel 79 towards the back. One strap is then passed through the longitudinally aligned button holes of the second set of positioning members of each panel and the strap tied in a bow on the top of the head. A portion 75 of the rear panel 79 bordering on the front edge 61 thereof is folded over to give an Vadditional ornamental effect.

FIG. 11 shows an arrangement wherein four of the basic panels are combined. The assembly is made as shown in FIG. 14, by passing the strap 50 through the second set of positioning members of four longitudinally overlapping panels 87, 88, 89 and 90 with the strap weaving among the panels through the second set of positioning members of one side of the panel assembly coming around the top of the assembly and then weaving the strap down through the second set of positioning members of the other side of the panel assembly.

It is preferred that the panel and the location of the positioning means be in a particular proportional relationship. For example, where the length of the panel from end point to end point A, in FIG. 6, is 17 inches, it is preferred that the width B in FIG. 6 of the panel be approximately between 31/2 to 51/2 wide. It is preferred that the transverse centers 37 and 38 of the first set of positioning members be positioned approximately 1%" to 21/2 from the points dimension C in FIG. 6. Thus, speaking generally, it is preferred for the length of the panel to be between 3 to 5 times the width, with 4 times being the optimum, and for the length to be between about 7 to 9 times the distance from one end of the panel to the transverse centers 37 and 38 of the adjacent rst set of positioning members, with about 8 times being the optimum. Where the offset pointed ends are used, it is preferred that the transverse centers 37 and 38 of the rst positioning means be approximately adjacent the commencement of the tapers 63 and 64 of the near side edge 60 as shown, and that the tapers 65 and 66 commence opposite the innermost extreme of the longitudinally aligned button holes 44 and 46 as shown. It is also preferred that the near side edge 60 be longer in length than the far side edge 61.

It is preferred that the strap be narrow, its width being about V15 to 1/18 of the panel length. The button holes are approximately the same length as the strap width. The strap length is preferred to be between 21/2 to 41/2 times the length of the panel with the optimum bei-ng about 31/2 times. It is also preferred that the width of the panel between the longitudinally aligned button holes and their respective adjacent panel edges dimensions D or E of FIG. 6 be preferably no greater, or at least not much greater, than the span, dimension F of FIG. 6, between the button holes. It is also preferred that the longitudinal center 34 and 35 of the span between the longitudinal button holes (the same line as forms the longitudinal center of the transverse button holes) be offset from the central axis 36 of the panel.

It is to be understood that additional positioning means could be added intermediate the rst and second positioning means. For example, in the modification of FIG. 16, a cluster of transversely a-nd longitudinally aligned button holes 91, 92, 93 and 94 may be placed at the transverse center 55 of the panel. The center button holes permit the formation of a ruined arrangement such as shown in FIG. 17 wherein one end of a first panel 82 is joined to one end of a second panel 83 through the first set of positioning members of such panels to the middle button holes of a third panel 84 as indicated at 85 in FIG. 17. The first and second panel are then compressed in an inverted U-shape to form a pair of ruflles. The ruflles are then held in place by the strap 50 which also passes through the rst set of positioning members at the far ends of said panels 82 and 83 as shown. When positioned on the head, the ruffled arrangement may look like the illustration of FIG. 18.

A fourth panel 86 might also be connected to the rue arrangement as shown in FIG. 18. The fourth panel fits around the head and is affixed to the ruffle arrangement by the passage of strap 50 through the irst set of positioning members of the fourth panel.

Button holes could also be added at angles other than an angle parallel or normal to the longitudinal central axis of the panel. FIG. 19 shows a modification where a hexagonal cluster 96 is used.

It is to be understood that the conguration of the ends might be other than pointed such as for example rounded 97 as shown in FIG. 20. It is preferred that the offset feature of the positioning means be maintained.

In forming some styles (not shown) the strap 50 could pass through both the transverse and longitudinal button holes of one end of a panel 25 as shown in FIG. 21, thereby permitting the strap to make a right angle turn.

A series of fastening means (not shown) might be provided such as male snap members located in the strap and corresponding female snap members on the panel to serve as an indexing means to assist in temporarily anchoring the strap for a particular style. For example, an accompanying book would give instructions that for a certain style the strap should be assembled so that the number 3 male snap member on the strap should be snapped into the No. 2 female snap member on the panel.

In some instances, fasteners might be used to fasten the panels 101, 102 and 103 with or without the use of the aforedescribed positioning means such as shown in FIG. 21 to form a hat design.

The hat styles shown in the drawings are merely for illustration and constitute only a few of the many hats that can be formed by this versatile panel.

It is to be understood, that the item could also be used for items other than hats such as to form a combination collar and vest as shown in FIG. 15. However, many of the really striking characteristics are not present and the style variations are limited. It is in the use as a hat that the panel and assorted fastening means achieve their most startling eiect and pleasing array of styles.

It is preferred that where loops are used to replace the slits or button holes, the positioning means adjacent each end consist of one transversely aligned loop to permit longitudinal movement of the strap therethrough and a pair of longitudinally aligned loops to permit transverse movement of the strap therethrough with the aforesaid loops being arranged in the form an an I. Thus the shape would be the same as though the aforedescribed slits were used. However, other arrangements are possible, such as the use of an additional transversely aligned loop and the rearrangement to form a square shaped configuration.

The terms and expressions which have been used are used as terms of description and not of limitation and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any of the features described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

I claim:

1. An apparel unit capable of being formed into a plurality of hat styles comprising, a plurality of elongated fabric panels disposed in lateral side-by-side and partially overlapping relationship, each of said fabric panels having substantially parallel sides and poi-nted ends, and having a length greater than the width, each of said panels having spaced slits adjacent each end thereof forming spaced passageways therethrough, and at least one strap engageably threaded through certain selective of said passageways adjacent the ends of the respective panels and having a length longer than that of each of the respective panels to form a unitary device.

2. An apparel unit in accordance with claim 1, wherein said passageways are comprised of a pair of oppositely disposed vertically oriented slits and a pair of oppositely disposed horizontally oriented slits.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,357,263 11/20 Tipograph 2-181 1,612,750 12/26 Stake 2-209.5 X 2,023,683 12/35 Horn et al 2-174 X 2,419,284 4/47 Reich 2--174 2,428,937 10/47 Lazarus 2-2093 X 2,560,267 7/51 Baker et al. 2-174 X 2,727,246 12/55 Long 2-198 3,106,721 10/63 Steer et a1. 2-209.1

FOREIGN PATENTS 68,969 4/49 Denmark. 482,684 9/29 Germany. 710,428 9/ 41 Germany. 431,963 7/ 35 Great Britain.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner. DAVID I. WILLIAMOWSKY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1357263 *Mar 28, 1919Nov 2, 1920Tipograph Carl MSweatband
US1612750 *Dec 24, 1925Dec 28, 1926Stake Elmer EAdjustable eyeshade
US2023683 *Apr 30, 1935Dec 10, 1935Horn Theodore AForehead shield
US2419284 *Sep 14, 1945Apr 22, 1947Reich Marion Louise KHead shield
US2428937 *Nov 23, 1945Oct 14, 1947Lazarus Hettye SHat
US2560267 *May 31, 1950Jul 10, 1951Baker Barbara RHairband
US2727246 *May 2, 1952Dec 20, 1955White Castle SystemPaper article of head wear
US3106721 *Oct 14, 1959Oct 15, 1963Hinman Virginia BDecorative wearing apparel
DE482684C *Sep 18, 1929Keller ErnstGleitsicherung fuer Hosentraegerstrippen
DE710428C *Apr 16, 1940Sep 12, 1941Johannes BueschlebKopfputz aus Zellhorn, Papier o. dgl. als Scherzgegenstand
DK68969A * Title not available
GB431963A * Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/209.11, 2/102, 2/171.4, 2/171, 2/204, 2/172, D02/880
International ClassificationA42B1/00, A42B1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/208
European ClassificationA42B1/20F