Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3209954 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1965
Filing dateNov 7, 1963
Priority dateNov 7, 1963
Publication numberUS 3209954 A, US 3209954A, US-A-3209954, US3209954 A, US3209954A
InventorsWebster Milo E
Original AssigneeBernz O Matic Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerosol spray container and filter
US 3209954 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1965 M. E. WEBSTER 3,209,954

AEROSOL SPRAY CONTAINER AND FILTER Filed Nov. 7, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR MILO E. WEBSTER BY 75% p qfl g m Spr ATTORN Y5 Oct. 5, 1965 E. WEBSTER AEROSOL SPRAY CONTAINER AND FILTER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 7, 1963 a a J INVENTOR M/LO E. WEBSTER DMZ? %EY$ button operation.

United States Patent 3,209,954 AEROSOL SPRAY CONTAINER AND FILTER Milo E. Webster, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to Bernz O Matic Corporation, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 7, 1963, Ser. No. 322,229 11 Claims. (Cl. 222-189) This invention relates to an improved aerosol spray container.

Various fluids, such as, for example, paints, insecticides, cleaners, deodorants, and the like are marketed in aerosol spray containers which permits their despensing and use as a fine aerosol spray.

The aerosol spray container generally comprises a pressurized container, as for example, a cylinder or can having therein the fluid to be dispensed and a propellant under pressure. A dip tube extends below the surface of the fluid and terminates at the bottom portion of the container and an aerosol spray valve, generally of the push-button type, is flow connected with the dip tube so that upon opening of the valve, as for example, by push-button operation, the pressure of the propellant forces the fluid from the container up through the dip tube and out through the aerosol valve in the form of a fine spray. The aerosol spray valve is provided with a terminal orifice which acts as the spray nozzle and is generally additionally provided with a primary orifice which is normally sealed but which becomes exposed, acting as the valve upon push- The orifices are in the form of constrictions having diameters which generally are larger than .020", as for example, between 0.20 and .040.

A major problem encountered in connection with the aerosol containers is the tendency of the aerosol valve to become plugged. This is particularly troublesome in connection with the dispensing of paint, and similar materials, but is also a problem in connection with the dispensing of other fluids. The plugging is generally caused by foreign particles or over-sized particles built up from the material being sprayed which sink to the bottom of the container and which are forced up the dip tube with the material being dispensed clogging one of the orifice constrictions in the aerosol spray valve. These particles which plug the orifice or orifices of the spray valve are firmly held in place by the pressure differential so that the plugging cannot be readily corrected and the container is rendered inoperative preventing further dispensing and use of the contents and resulting in severe customer dissatisfaction.

One object of this invention is a construction which reliably avoids the above-mentioned disadvantage in a simple and economical manner.

This and still further objects will become apparent from the following description read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevation view in cross-section showing an aerosol dispenser according to the invention; and

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of an insert for use in an aerosol container according to the invention;

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the insert shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 are fragmentary views of a container as is shown in FIG. 1, and showing alternative forms of construction for the container parts.

In the drawings like reference characters indicate corresponding parts.

In accordance with the invention, the plugging of aerosol valves is prevented by installing an insert in the conduit provided for conveying fluid to the orifice restriction in the valve (and which can be made up of a number of elements such as a dip tube, valve inlet and internal valve passageways). The insert effects a straining of the fluid 3,209,954 l atented Oct. 5, 1965 to prevent particles as would constrict the orifice from passing to the orifice. The insert is a solid piece disposed in close fitting relation with the walls of the conduit and the surface of the insert confronting the wall of the conduit has a plurality of axially extending grooves providing a like number of axially extending passageways each defined by one of the grooves and the overlying portion of the conduit. The passageways are smaller than the valve orifice constriction, so that the desired straining can be effected. The insert can be in integral part of the valve or can be a separate part suitably inserted in some part of the conduit, such as in a dip tube or in one of the valve passageways.

The grooves in the insert, conveniently, are rectangular having a depth dimension extending radially and a width dimension extending circumferentially. The smaller of said dimensions is preferably about 20% smaller than the diameter of the smallest orifice constriction of the valve. Commonly the smallest of said dimensions is desirably between about 0.010" and 0.015. The smallest orifice constriction is commonly about 0.020 diameter. These dimensions find particular application in the case of paint.

Referring to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, 1 represents the pressurized container which in the embodiment shown is in the form of an aluminum cylinder, though any known or conventional container, as for example, the conventional tin cans may be used. The opening at the upper end of the container is seal-ed by the conventional crimped sealing cap 2 which is provided with the aerosol spray valve having the plastic push-button spray head 3 provided with the terminal spray orifice 4, the intermediate expansion chamber 5, and the primary orifice 6. The primary orifice 6 consists of a lateral hole extending through the wall of the stem portion 7 in communication with the intermediate expansion chamber 5. The aerosol spray valve is also provided with the hollow metal housing 8 joined by crimping to the cap 2. The housing 8 contains the spring 9 and the spring plunger 10 which is connected to the stem 7 of the spray button. The stem 7 extends through a central hole in the cap 2 provided with the gasket 11. The spring 9 normally forces the plunger 10 upward so that its upper edge contacts the gasket 11, and the primary orifice 6 is sealed by the gasket 11. When the spray button 3 is depressed, the spring 9 is compressed, and the primary orifice 6 exposed. Pressed into the lower end of the housing 8 is the dip tube 12 which can be formed of plastic material, as for example, polyethylene, polyvinylchloride or the like. The dip tube 12 extends to the bottom of the container 1 in the conventional manner, and as shown to the lowermost forward corner of the container.

The container 1 contains the liquid 15 to be dispensed,-

as for example, the paint, and is additionally charged with a propellent as for example liquefied propane, the propane vapor filling and pressurizing the upper space at 16. A conventional agitator ball or balls, for example, the glass agitator ball 17 is also provided in the container to aid the mixing of the paint by shaping prior to use.

In operation, the container is shaken and the agitator ball 17 aids in mixing the paint which generally consists of pigments, vehicle solids such as resin, and solvent. The terminal orifice 4 is then pointed at the surface to be coated and the spray head 3 depressed. The downward movement of the spray head 3 exposes the primary orifice 6 and causes downward movement of the plunger 10 and compression of the spring 9.

The pressure of the propellent vapor forces the paint up through the dip tube 12 past the plunger 8, which is provided with suitable clearance or openings for this purpose, through. the primary orifice 6 into the expansion chamber and out through the terminal orifice 4 in the form of a fine spray which is used to coat the surface.

Upon release of the spray head 3, the action of the spring 9 in the conventional manner forces the spray head 3 upwardly so that the orifice 6 is masked by the gasket 11 shutting off the spray.

Normally, if a foreign particle were present in the paint, as for example a flake of aluminum in connection with aluminum containers or a piece of oxidized steel in connection with steel containers, or an agglomeration of pigment particles, or over-sized pigment particles or the like, the same, after sinking to the bottom of the container would be forced through the dip tube 12 clogging either the primary orifice 6 and/or the terminal orifice 4- rendering the container inoperative. The differential pressure would lock such particle in place over or in the orifice in question so that the situation could not be readily remedied except for example by exchanging the spray head.

In accordance with the invention, an insert 20, shown in detail in FIGS. 2 and 3, is utilized to prevent clogging of the valve. The insert is an elongated, solid piece of plastic such as polyethylene, desirably low pressure polyethylene, having a plurality of axially extending grooves 21. The insert 26, as shown in FIG. 1, is installed in the lower end of the dip tube 12, wherein it is received as a press fit and is disposed in tight fitting relation with the wall of the dip tube 12.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the valve includes a plastic housing 22 which is crimped in place in the cap 2 to secure the valve on the container. The valve includes, as an integral part of the plastic housing 22, the insert 24. The end of dip tube 12 is slid over the insert to provide the insert in the conduit from the fluid in the container to the valve, all to provide straining action of the insert according to the invention.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the insert as well as the confronting conduit wall portion, which with the slots in the insert define the passageways provided for straining, are included as parts of the valve assembly. The valve is provided with an insert 24 as an integral part thereof, just as in the case of the embodiment shown in FIG. 4. Further, however, the valve is outfitted with the nipple 25 which is in tight fitting relation with the insert 24, the inside walls of the nipple 25 overlying the grooves 21 so as to provide passageways for straining. The dip tube 12 is slid over the nipple 25 and is secured thereon by the enlargement 26 of the nipple.

With the construction in accordance with the invention, a particle as would tend to plug or clog an orifice constriction of the valve would merely become wedged against an entrance to a groove 21 and would not interfere with operations as paint or other fluid could be forced through the other grooves 21. Any particle passing through a groove 21 could not clog in the orifices 6 or 4 as these latter orifices are of a larger size than the perforations 14. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, even if all the grooves 21 become covered by foreign particles, this would not present a serious problem as further agitation and the action of the agitator ball would dislodge such particles so that the container could be rendered again operative. Commonly, a lodged particle, regardless of the position of the insert 21 will become dislodged because of pressure equalization across the insert.

The inside diameter of the conduit in which the insert is installed can be about and the insert can be of somewhat greater diameter to provide a press fit. About 2i) grooves can be formed in the insert.

Advantages of construction according to the invention include low cost and dependability. Further the construction can be incorporated into the construction of existing or previously known parts of the container or it can be merely added to known container parts, such as by merely placing the insert in the dip tube.

The improvement in accordance with the invention is, of course, applicable in connection with any of the known or conventional aerosol spray containers provided with any of the known or conventional aerosol spray valves and charged with any of the conventional aerosol materials, and conventional propellents, as for example, fluorinated hydrocarbon, such as the various freons used for this purpose.

While the invention has been described in detail with reference to specific embodiments shown, various changes and modifications which fall within the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims will become apparent to the skilled artisan. The invention, therefore, is only intended to be limited by the appended claims or their equivalents wherein I have endeavored to claim all inherent novelty.

What is claimed is:

1. In an aerosol spray container comprising a pressurized container having therein a fluid to be dispensed and a propellent under pressure, a valve for discharge of fluid from the container mounted on the container, said valve having at least one orifice constriction, a conduit for conveying fluid from within the container to the orifice constriction for passage therethrough, the improvement which comprises a solid insert positioned in said conduit in close fitting relation with the walls thereof, the surface of the insert confronting the conduit wall having a plurality of axially extending grooves providing a like number of axially extending passageways each defined by one of said grooves and the overlying portion of the conduit and communicating the portion of the conduit on one side of the insert with the portion of the conduit on the other side of the insert, said passageways being smaller than said orifice for straining the fluid to prevent particles as would constrict said orifice from passing to the orifice.

2. Improvement according to claim 1, wherein said conduit includes a valve inlet and a dip tube having one end thereof communicating with the valve inlet and the other end thereof communicating with the fluid in the container, said insert being disposed in said dip tube.

3. Improvement according to claim 1, wherein said insert is integral with the valve housing.

4. In an aerosol spray container comprising a pressurized container having therein a fluid to be dispensed and a propellent under pressure, a valve for discharge of fluid from the container mounted on the container and having a valve inlet disposed within the container for receiving fluid from the container, said valve having at least one orifice constriction, a dip tube within the container having one end thereof in flow communication with the said valve inlet and the other end thereof disposed below the surface of the fluid in the container for receiving the fluid for conveyance to the valve inlet, the improvement which comprises an insert disposed in said clip tube in tight fitting relation with the walls thereof, the surface of the insert confronting the dip tube having a plurality of axially extending grooves providing a like number of axially extending passageways each defined by one of said grooves and the overlying portion of said tube and communicating the portion of the dip tube on one side of the insert with the portion of the dip tube on the other side of the insert, said passageways being smaller than said orifice for straining the fluid to prevent particles as would constrict said orifice frompassing to the orifice.

5. Improvement according to claim 4 in which said aerosol spray valve has a primary and terminal orifice and in which saidperforations are smaller than both said orifices.

6. Improvement according to claim 4 in which said fluid is paint.

7. Improvement according to claim 4, said passageways having a depth dimension extending radially and a width dimension extending circumferentially, the smaller of said dimensions being between about 0.010 and 0.015".

8. Improvement according to claim 6, said passageways having a depth dimension extending radially and a width dimension extending circumferentially, the smaller of said dimensions being between about 0.010 and 0.015".

9. Improvement according to claim 8 wherein the smallest orifice constriction in the valve being greater than about 0.020" diameter.

10. In an aerosol spray container having a dip tube in flow communication wtih a discharge opening from the container, the improvement comprising an insert disposed in said dip tube in tight fitting relation with the walls thereof, the surface of the insert confronting the dip tube having a plurality of axially extending grooves providing a like number of axially extending passageways each defined by one of said grooves and the overlying portion of said tube and communicating the portion of the dip tube on one side of the insert with the portion of the dip tube on the other side of the insert, the said passageways being of a smaller size than the smallest cross-sectional size of the flow path from the dip tube through the discharge opening.

11. Improvement according to claim 10, wherein the dip tube is expansible and the insert press fit therein and the tube elastically grips the insert and prevents displacement thereof.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,964,218 6/34 Schargorodsky 23986 2,376,231 5/45 Cohn 222189 X 2,774,628 12/56 Engstrum 222189 2,815,889 12/57 Stetz et al 222-189 3,098,589 7/63 Graham 222189 X 3,129,730 4/64 Simon 222-189 X LOUIS J. DEMBO, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 3,209,954 October S, 1965 Milo E. Webster It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 32, for "0.20 and .040 read .020 and .040--; column 5, line 11, for "wtih" read with Signed and sealed this 23rd day of August 1966.

(SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWHJER EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1964218 *Feb 20, 1932Jun 26, 1934Firm Hannoversche Maschb ActieMeans for filtering the fuel supplied to the injector nozzles of internal combustion engines
US2376231 *Feb 12, 1942May 15, 1945David J CohnPipette
US2774628 *May 10, 1954Dec 18, 1956Engstrum Kathleen BApparatus for dispensing under pressure
US2815889 *Jul 28, 1955Dec 10, 1957Engine Parts Mfg CompanyMetering device controlling discharge of fluids from aerosol containers
US3098589 *May 20, 1960Jul 23, 1963Montgomery Graham Cecil RobertLiquid dispensing device
US3129730 *Jul 14, 1961Apr 21, 1964Simon John FTapping system for liquid container or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4030667 *Jun 5, 1975Jun 21, 1977Establissements Valois S.A.Push-button having a calibrated outlet for a container under pressure
US4035303 *Jan 16, 1976Jul 12, 1977Seaquist Valve CompanyOpen mesh filter element
US4107043 *Mar 3, 1977Aug 15, 1978Creative Dispensing Systems, Inc.Inlet conduit fluid filter
US4122978 *Oct 6, 1976Oct 31, 1978The Gillette CompanyPressurized package for dispensing a product in a finely dispersed spray pattern with little dilution by propellant
US4148419 *Aug 12, 1977Apr 10, 1979Metal Box LimitedAerosol valve assembly having gas diffuser for charging
US5628432 *Apr 3, 1996May 13, 1997Mosley; JuliusPersonal cooling system
US6833072Oct 31, 2003Dec 21, 2004Saint-Gobain Calmar Inc.Flexible dip tube filter with weight
US7048156 *Apr 22, 2004May 23, 2006Micasa Trading CorporationLiquid spray dispenser and suction tube therefor
US8087548May 14, 2008Jan 3, 2012S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Spray products with particles and improved valve for inverted dispensing without clogging
US8091741 *Sep 29, 2008Jan 10, 2012Michael PritchardFluid dispenser
US20130008898 *Mar 22, 2011Jan 10, 2013Merck Patent Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungStainless-steel drum container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/189.1, 222/402.24, 210/431, 210/463
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/32
European ClassificationB65D83/32