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Publication numberUS3209972 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1965
Filing dateJun 25, 1962
Priority dateJun 25, 1962
Publication numberUS 3209972 A, US 3209972A, US-A-3209972, US3209972 A, US3209972A
InventorsBenbow Opal W
Original AssigneeBenbow Opal W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High speed feeding of paper forms
US 3209972 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1965 o. W. BENBow HIGH SPEED FEEDING OF PAPER FORMS 2 Sheets-Sheecl l Filed June 25, 1962 Ufa] Wepaw Oct. 5, 1965 o. W. BENBOW 3,209,972

HIGH SPEED FEEDING OF PAPER FORMS Filed June 25, 1962 2 Sheecs-SheecI 2 go o o of4`o o O 'wmmowfff gmomomomoglfl' IN VENTOR ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,209,972 HIGH SPEED FEEDING F PAPER FORMS Opal W. Benbow, 3624 Connecticut Ave. NW., Washington, D.C. Filed June 25, 1962, Ser. No. 204,672 Claims. (Cl. 226-74) This invention relates to the advancing of paper forms through accounting or printing machines or the like and in particular to improved apparatus for effectively advancing paper forms through such machines at high speed While printing or other operations are simultaneously performed on the forms.

Electric accounting machines and data processing output machines generally use continuous paper forms, in single or multiple parts which are advanced through the machine while the desired information is typed thereon by an operator yor by means of an automatic system which takes the information from a punched data card or magnetic tape. The forms used by these machines have marginally punched holes and, conventionally, the machines employ a drive means for engaging these marginal holes in order to advance the continuous forms through the machine. More particularly, prior advancing mechanisms have often utilized a driven endless belt arranged parallel to the paper adjacent each margin. Each belt has a plurality of spaced pins or lugs extending perpendicularly therefrom so that the pins or lugs project into the holes and thereby drag the forms along with the belts. In order to maintain the margin `of the forms in engagement with the belt, it has heretofore been the practice to provide a stationary flat guide plate or the like parallel to the form on the side opposite the endless belt. During operation lof the drive the form engages the guide and slides therealong, or if the pins extend beyond the form the latter is merely held loosely between the guide and the belt. A drive system of this general kind is disclosed in Patent No. 2,862,708 issued December 2, 1958, and in Patent No. 2,140,028, issued December 13, 1938.

While the driven belt and stationary guide plate arrangement performs satisfactorily at relatively low belt speeds of about 100 lines per minute, it has been found that as the belt speed is increased the forms tend to ride up off the tapered pins. The forms then come positively into sliding contact with whatever stationary guide means have been provided and thereby impart considerable frictional drag to the paper. This resistance to movement of the form not only places strains on the belt and other elements of the drive, but also may cause the paper to tear or ride off the pins, necessitating stopping yof the machine for manual adjustament of forms. Further, when a plurality of superimposed forms are used, the forms nearest the guide may slip relative to the other forms, thus changing the alignment between some of the forms. Still further, at belt speeds of about 600 lines per minute or more which are provided in some types of high-speed printers, abrupt stopping of the belt results in sliding or tearing of the form.

It is, therefore, a primary object of the present invention to provide a printing machine or the like with a feed and advance mechanism which effectively conveys a .paper form having marginally punched holes through the machine at high speed without creating frictional drag or other destructive forces on the paper.

It is a further object to provide a printing machine with a feed and advance mechanism which effectively maintains alignment of a plurality of superimposed continuous forms having marginally punched holes while conveying the forms through the machine at high speed.

It is a still further object to provide a feed and advance mechanism of the above type which includes opposed pairs of endless belts for each margin of the form, the belts ICC of each pair being arranged so that the pins on one belt project into the apertures on the other belt, thus positively engaging the paper between the two belts without creating any frictional dragon the paper.

The invention will be further understood from a reading of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings in Which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view, partly broken away, of a printing machine embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of one pair of the endless belts of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view of a pair of belts of modified form;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of a pair of belts of a still further modified form;

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of the two belts of FIG- URE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of the two belts of FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view of a pair of opposed wheels provided with opposed pins and apertures; and

FIGURE 8 is a side elevational view of a pair of moditied wheels.

According to the invention the feed and advance mechanism for the paper form includes at least one pair of opposed endless belts or chains for gripping an edge lof the form between them. At least one of the belts is provided with longitudinally spaced pins extending outwardly at right angles thereto and the opposed belt is provided with longitudinally spaced apertures or cavities therein to receive the ends `of the pins on the first-mentioned belt.

Referring to FIGURE 1, a printing machine 10 of a type adapted to use marginally punched continuous forms 12 having holes 13 in their edges is illustrated somewhat schematically. The machine includes as essential parts an advance mechanism 14 for advancing the form 12 toward the right as viewed in the drawing and a case 16 supporting the drive mechanism and containing the printing machinery, motor drive for the advance mechanism 14 land other mechanical and electrical elements for operating the machine. The printing machinery (not shown) is located forwardly of and below the advance mechanism 14 and, `as is conventional in the art, includes a roller behind the form 12 and typing elements in front of the form adjacent the roller. A guide base 20 having a horizontal portion 22 is mounted behind the advance mechanism 14 for guiding the form on to a suitable table 24 `or other receptacle for receiving the same.

As shown, the advance mechanism includes .a frame 24 having vertical side plates 26 spaced apart by a pair of horizontally extending bars 28. A pair of spaced, parallel upper shafts 30 and 32 extend between the side plates 24 transversely of the direction of travel of the form 12 and are suitably journaled for rotation in the plates. A similar pair of shafts 34 and 36 are journaled in the plates 34 below the upper shafts 30 and 32. The forward upper and lower shafts 30 and 34 extend laterally beyond the side plates 26 and are provided with gear wheels 35 which intermesh with a pair of idler gears 35. The lower shaft has, in addition, a sprocket Wheel 39 thereon engaging an endless chain 40 which is driven intermittently clockwise by a suitable motor and linkage 41 within the machine.

The drive mechanism for the form 12 further includes a pair of spaced sprocket wheels on each of the shafts 30, 32, 34 and 36. The sprocket wheels are so arranged that the wheels 42 on the upper shafts 30 and 32 are in opposed relation to the wheels 44 on the lower shafts 34 and 36. Preferably each of the wheels 42 and 44 will be adjustably mounted ion the shafts, as by means of a extending tianges.

set screw 46 passing transversely through a hub 48 at the center of each wheel. The Sprocket wheels 42 on the upper shafts 30 and 32 have looped over them endless chains 50 and the sprocket wheels 44 on the lower shafts 34 and 36 have looped over them endless chains 52.

According to the invention and as illustrated in the embodiment of FIGURES l and 2, each of the lower chains has secured to its outer surface in any convenient manner a plurality of pins 54 which are spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing between adjacent holes 13 in the margins of the form 12. Preferably, and as is conventional in the art, the pins are tapered outwardly along involute curves to facilitate their entry into and withdrawal from the holes in the form 12 during operation of the machine 10. The exterior surface of the upper chain 50 has secured thereto a plurality of blunt buttonlike projections such as rectangular blocks 56 which are spaced apart the same distance as the pins 54 on the lower belt 52, thus forming cavities 57 therebetween. The two belts are so arranged on their sprockets that the blocks 56 are longitudinally offset from the pins 52 and are thereby adapted to engage the upper surface of the margin of the form 12.

The chains 50 and 52 are spaced apart a distance such that the terminal surface of the blocks 56 are spaced from the exterior surface of the lower chain 52 a distance approximately equal to the thickness of the form 12. As shown, a single form is being processed but ordinarily several forms superimposed on each other will be handled. In this event the spacing between the blocks 56 and the lower chain 52 should be increased to accommodate the several forms. Alternatively or additionally, the blocks 56 may be constructed of resilient material which will adjust to the thickness of the forms.

The precise construction of the chains 50 and 52 with their respective blocks 56 or pins 54 is not critical so long as the above described relationship among blocks 56, pins 54 and the form 12 is retained. The blocks 54 and pins 52 may be secured directly to the links of the chains or a suitable intermediate structure may be provided therebetween. In some machines it may be desirable to offset the blocks and pins laterally from the chain by providing the links of the chains with thin laterally It is also contemplated that endless belts rather than endless chains would be suitable under -some conditions and that belts looped over chains would also be suitable.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 3 and 5, an upper 'chain 50 is provided with a plurality of longitudinally spaced pin-receiving cavities 57 and lower chain 52 is provided with spaced pins 54. The chains are so arranged on their sprockets 42 and 44' and are so spaced apart that the form 12 is rmly gripped between the opposed chains. As shown in FIGURE the cavities 57 are generally elliptical to permit entry and withdrawal of the pins 54 but any shape could be used which provides sufficient clearance between the cavity wall and the pins 54' during their relative movements. In the particular construction shown the exterior surfaces of the chains 50 and 52 have secured thereto a plurality of cleats 69 which are provided with the cavities 57 or the pins 54. In this embodiment as in the embodiment of FIGURES 1 and 2 the pins are spaced apart a distance equal to the spacing between the holes 13 in the form 12.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 4 and 6 each of the upper and lower chains 50 and 52" is provided with an outer tightly titting flexible belt 62. Each belt 62 is provided with spaced pins 54 and cavities 57 in alternating relationship, the distance between adjacent cavities and pins being the spacing between holes 13. The belts are offset longitudinally so that each pin 54" is opposite a cavity 57 whereby the pins 54 may pass through holes 13 and into cavities 57 in the opposite belt 62. FIGURE 4 illustrates a further feature of the present invention in that the lower chain 52" and belt 62 extend beyond the upper chain 50" in a direction opposite to the direction of travel of the forms 12, two of which are illustrated in this figure. This feature is advantageous in feeding a new form into the device in that it leaves at least one pin 54 exposed for engaging the first hole at the end of a new form.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate the principles of the present invention applied to opposed drive wheels for paper forms 12. As seen in FIGURE 7, the peripheral surfaces of identical drive wheels 64 are provided with spaced alternate pins 66 and cavities 68, and the wheels 64 are arranged so that the pins 66 are opposed to the cavities 68 in the other wheel. In FIGURE 8, an upper wheel 70 is provided only with spaced cavities 68 and a lower Wheel 72 is provided only with pins 66. As in the case of the pins and cavities of FIGURES 1-7, the spacings therebetween will be selected so that in operation of the device a pin 66 will pass through each marginally punched hole 13 of a form 12 and into a cavity 68 whereby the form will be held securely between the peripheries of the wheels. Conveniently, each of the wheels 64 and 70 may be mounted on a driven shaft 74 and may be adjustably mounted thereon. The shafts 74 may be driven in any convenient manner as by gears or sprockets so as to maintain the desired relationship between opposed wheels. The wheel drive of FIGURES 7 and 8 can be used as a drive and form-alignment mechanism in electric accounting machines and high speed printers or auxiliary equipment. Low speed printers or simpler machines which include standard typewriting elements in their mechanisms may use the wheel drive of the present invention as the primary advance device for the paper forms.

The operation of the machine 10 is believed to be clear from the preceding description. The paper form 12 is securely held along both margins by the various pin and cavity arrangements described above and is advanced intermittently past a printing station within the case 16. The printing mechanism and the motor drive for the chain 40, and consequently for the remainder of the advance mechanism 14, receive their signals from auxiliary equipment which takes information from punched cards or magnetic tape or from electronic computers. In some instances, particularly when the machine 10 1s connected to a computer, the printing and advance mechanisms operate at rates of 60() printed lines per minute and higher; that is, the advance mechanism may start and stop morethan 600 times a minute. The clamping of the margins of the form by the disclosed movable elements and the absence of frictional drag on the paper by the drive elements achieve accurate movement of the form without damage thereto.

Further, when a plurality of superimposed forms are used in conjunction with the drive arrangement of the present invention, no precautions need be taken to assure that the forms will be maintained in alignment with each other. With prior drive systems it has been found necessary to fasten the forms together by temporary methods such as crimping or by more permanent methods such as glulng or stapling. In either case the initial cost of the forms is increased by the inclusion of the fastening means, and the cost of using the forms is increased by the necessity of separating the forms after processing through the machine. Thus, by eliminating the necessity for fastening the forms together, the present invention effects a substantial savings to the users of machines which process continuous, marginally punched forms and to the makers of the forms.

While several embodiments have been described by way of illustration, it is not intended that the invention be limited to the details thereof except as such details apypear in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1..In a printing machine or the like which includes a printing station for applying printing to a portion of a continuous paper form having marginally punched holes therein and drive means for advancing the form intermittently and longitudinally of itself to said station, an improved drive means which effects rapid intermittent advance of the form Without appreciable frictional drag on the form, said drive means comprising: spaced rst and second pairs of endless members the members of each pair arranged in opposed relationship for carrying a margin of a paper form therebetween; spaced projections carried by at least one endless member of each pair extending outwardly at right angles thereto for projecting into and through the holes in the respective margin of the paper form to be advanced, the other endless member of each pair having cavities therein opposite said projections, said cavities receiving said projections as the members of each pair revolve whereby the respective margin of the paper form is retained between each pair of endless membersi separate power-operated means associated with each endless member of each pair for positively revolving its respective endless member to thereby advance the paper form, each of said power-operated means being independent of the paper form and of any engagement between the endless members of a pair; means independent of the paper form and of any engagement between the endless members of a pair for synchronizing movement of the endless members of each pair; and means independent of the paper form for synchronizing movement of the said rst and second pairs of endless members.

2. Apparatus as in claim 1 in which each of said endless members includes an endless looped member.

3. Apparatus as in claim 2 in which one of said endless members of each pair extends beyond the other in a direction opposite to the direction of travel of the form to facilitate introducing the end of a paper form between the looped members.

4. Apparatus as in claim 2 in which said cavities are formed by the spaces between longitudinally spaced button-like members extending from the endless member.

5. Apparatus as in claim 1 in which each of said endless members is a rotatable wheel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 351,190 10/86 Mayberry 198--165 1,723,950 8/ 29 Mueller. 1,852,419 4/ 32 Kuchenmeister 226-85 2,140,028 12/ 38 Nichols 226-74 2,351,999 6/ 44 Nerwin 226-74 2,45 3,031 1 l 48 Olds 226--74 2,572,172 10/51 McCusker 198-165 FOREIGN PATENTS 471,871 9/ 37 Great Britain.

ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner.

HARRISON R. MOSLEY, RAPHAEL M. LUPO,

ERNEST A. FALLER, Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US351190 *Jul 27, 1885Oct 19, 1886 Harvester-elevator
US1723950 *Aug 24, 1927Aug 6, 1929Mueller Frank JFilm-handling apparatus
US1852419 *Jun 23, 1928Apr 5, 1932Kuchenmeister HeinrichFilm advancing appliance
US2140028 *May 22, 1936Dec 13, 1938Nichols Ellsworth JMultiple form aligning device
US2351999 *Dec 28, 1940Jun 20, 1944Nerwin HubertRoll-film camera
US2453031 *Aug 2, 1946Nov 2, 1948Technicolor Motion PictureCinematographic apparatus
US2572172 *Feb 21, 1948Oct 23, 1951Native Laces & Textiles IncCoacting endless belt conveyer
GB471871A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3490668 *Jul 28, 1967Jan 20, 1970Mohawk Data Sciences CorpDevice for feeding perforated webs
US3608801 *Apr 16, 1970Sep 28, 1971Paper Converting Machine CoWeb transport system
US3828997 *May 30, 1973Aug 13, 1974United Ind SyndicateApparatus for positively conveying sheet materials
US4412637 *Oct 5, 1981Nov 1, 1983Datamarc, Inc.Bidirectional document feed tractor unit
US4741641 *Feb 27, 1987May 3, 1988Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaTractor having an endless belt with driving pins
Classifications
U.S. Classification226/74
International ClassificationB41J11/26, B41J11/30
Cooperative ClassificationB41J11/30
European ClassificationB41J11/30