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Publication numberUS3210093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1965
Filing dateJun 25, 1963
Priority dateJun 25, 1963
Publication numberUS 3210093 A, US 3210093A, US-A-3210093, US3210093 A, US3210093A
InventorsSteidinger Donald J
Original AssigneeUarco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binder for stationery
US 3210093 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1965 D. J. STEIDINGERI 3,210,093

BINDER FOR STATIONERY Filed June 25, 1963 3,210,093 BINDER FOR STATIONERY Donald J. Steidinger, Barrington, IlL, assignor to Uarco Incorporated, a corporation of Illinois Filed June 25, 1963, Ser. No. 290,392 3 Claims. (Cl. 28121) This application relates to binders and more particularly to a binder having a tube or container of liquid adhesive therein adapted to secure the edges of the stationery thereto.

In the modern business World wherein temporary or semipermanent preservation of tabulations of rapid data processing, reports, or the like, is essential it is necessary that there .be a binder means for storing such reports It is desirable that this binder be capable of neatly storing such stationery in a generally trim or flat configuration. It is further desirable that this binder be adapted for rapid securement of the stationary therein and preferably have self-contained means for securing the stationery thereto. An acute problem arises in attempting to bind continuous form stationery for the edges defined by the fold lines, about which the stationery should be bound, are random spaced producing a relative unevenness.

It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a new and improved binder for stationery.

It is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved binder for stationery having a self-contained pocket of liquid adhesive therein.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a new and improved binder for continuous form stationery having a self-contained pocket of liquid adhesive therein and being adapted to permit ready exposure of said adhesive to the edges of stationary for binding the stationery in book form in the binder.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a new and improved binder for continuous form stationery having a self-contained pocket of liquid adhesive therein and adapted to secure stationery in the binder in book form to produce a binder of trim external configuration.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a new and improved binder for continuous form stationery having a self-contained pocket of liquid adhesive therein and being adapted for ready exposure of the adhesive to con-tact the folded edges of said stationery and permit penetration of the most protruding edge of stationery in said liquid adhesive While having a suflicient depth to also contact the least protruding edge of said stationery to bind the stationery in the binder in book form.

Other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a binder embodying this invention showing the stationery bound therein in book form;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the binder folded out flat in a position to receive a stack of continuous form stationery;

FIGURE 3 is a broken view of a strip of continuous form stationery adapted to be bound by this binder;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged section view of the backbone portion of the binder in an upright position showing the random spacing of the folded edges of the stationery and their relative position within the adhesive;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view of the backbone strip of the binder of this invention showing the liquid adhesive container means and liquid adhesive of this invention;

FIGURE 6 is a partially broken enlarged isometric view of the backbone strip of the binder of this invention United States Patent 0 "ice showing a second embodiment of the liquid adhesive container means of this invention;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary isometric view illustrating the position in which continuous form zigzag folded stationery may be secured to the binder.

The binder .10 of this invention is adapted to secure stationery 11 therein in book-like form as illustrated in FIG- URE 1. The binder consists of a sheet of relatively stiff paper-like material having a pair of centrally disposed generally parallel score lines 12 and 13 forming covers 14 and 15 and a backbone strip 16. An adhesive container, tube, or adhesive means 17 is positioned on the backbone strip for securing the stationery thereto in a manner to be described later so that the covers 14 and 15 may be swung about the hinge or fold lines 1 2 and 13, respectively, to bind the stationery therein in book form as shown in FIGURE 1.

The binder is suited for securing individual sheets of stationery as well as continuous form station-ery 11. As shown in FIGURE 3 the continuous form stationery 11 has a plurality of transverse lines of weakening 20 about which the stationery is folded. The stationery is provided with a plurality of control punch holes 2.1 formed along the length of the marginal edges thereof which. holes are used to mate with appropriate pin driving mech" anisms or the like for driving the stationery through appropriate procesing machines. The stationery generally has an information bearing side 22 and a noninformation bearing side 23 which may be coated with a carbon substance or transfer material 24 to eliminate the need for a separate interleaved sheet of carbon paper between the several plies of the stationery during multiple imprinting thereof.

The stationery may be zigzag folded about its fold lines 20 to form a stack 25. It is in this form that the stationery is placed in the binder for binding in book form. When the stationery is zigzag folded into a stack 25 there is relative spacing between the several form lengths of the stack so that they fail to accurately describe a plane transverse to the plane of the form lengths. Instead the random spaced edges form an edge of the stack approximating a plane transverse to the form lengths of the stationery with the aforementioned relative unevenness between the several edges. This is clearly illustrated in FIGURE 4. This unevenness complicates the problems of adhering the zigzag folded stack of stationery to a backbone strip along the fold lines thereof.

It is desirable that a zigzag folded stack of continuous form stationery be secured along the fold lines so that the information bearing side 22 may be presented to view and the noninformation bearing side 23, which may have the transfer substance 24 thereon, may be kept out of view and out of touch. Therefore an adhesive must be of sufficient depth to permit the edges of greater protuberance to penetrate therein and yet contact the top most vertically remote folded edge of the stack. A thick coating of a liquid adhesive or glue might be suitable for this purpose but the application of such a glue is relatively messy and not well suited for office use,

The adhesive means or adhesive container means 17 of this invention provides a self-contained supply of liquid adhesive with the binder which supply is adapted to be exposed for contacting the edges of the stationery to be held in the binder. The means 17 is substantially a container tube or bag of glue including a bottom 27, removable top 26 and a liquid adhesive 28 contained therebetween. The bottom 27 is secured to one side of the backbone strip 16 and the liquid adhesive is adherent thereto. The top 26 has a coating of a quick release material and is adapted to protect, cover, or enclose the liquid adhesive 28 but not to adhere to the adhesive. Suitable perforations at the juncture of the top 26 and bottom 27 permit the removal of the top to expose the liquid adhesive to contact the folded edges of the stack so that the stack might be positioned on the backbone strip and secured to the binder in a position as shown in FIGURE 7.

A modified embodiment of this invention as shown in FIGURE 6 comprehends the use of a plurality of generally longitudinally extending individual containers or tubes of adhesive. A plurality of individual covers, such as 26a, 26b and 26c are associated with a common bottom 27a to enclose individual quantities or supplies of liquid adhesive 28a in a given tube. The covers 260 and 26b and so on are secured to the bottom 27a along lines of perforation so that they may be easily removable. Thus selected widths of glue strips may be exposed for securing stationery stacks in the binder having a lesser cross sectional thickness than the backbone strip. As successive quantities of stationery are to be secured in the binder, further strips may be exposed by removing the additional covers such as 26b and 260.

The liquid adhesives stored in the tube or container may be of any conventional type suited for adhering paper material or the like. Preferably the adhesive would be semi-plastic or extremely viscous so as to tend to hold its shape as defined by the container for a relatively short period of time so that the stationery may be brought in contact with the glue before it tends to flow and lose the depth provided in its contained state. As clearly illustrated in FIGURE 4, the self-contained supply of glues may have a sufiicient depth to accommodate both the extremely protruding folded edges as well as the most vertically remote edge so that all the edges may contact and be adhered to the glue for permanent securement in the binder.

In use the binder of this invention is prepared for binding a separate sheet of stationery or a zigzag folded stack thereof by removing a selected strip of the top of the glue pack to expose the liquid glue. The edges of the separate sheets of stationery or the fold line edges of zigzag folded stack of stationery are placed against the liquid glue and allowed to sink therein. The exposure of the liquid glue to air will cause the glue to set and securely bind the stationery sheets therein. Office personnel binding stationery with this binder need merely place the stationery in the binder as described, close the binder covers and then place the binder aside for a few minutes while the glue dries in response to its exposure to the air. The stationery sheets will be securely bound therein, similar to the securernent obtained by conventional bookbinding done in a bindery. It is to be noted that this secure binding is accomplished without the aid of auxiliary equipment, without the need of separate messy applications of liquid glue, and insures permanent securement of the stationery in the binder.

With the binder of this invention, there is provided the advantage of permanent adherence through the use of a liquid or serniliquid glue. While pressure sensitive adhesives may be capable of securely holding sheets of stationery against slippage or gravity, it is possible that stationery, if subjected to sufficient force, may be pulled away from a pressure sensitive adhesive. Thus it is preferable to use a liquid adhesive which will permanently cement the stationery in the binder if it is desirous to prevent accidental or surreptitious removal of sheets from the binder. With the container means disclosed in this invention, the problems confronted in applying ordinary liquid glue are overcome. The glue supply is self-contained with the binder, and the protective strip need merely be pulled back to expose the glue to the folded edges of the stationery which are brought in contact with the glue and thereby secured to the binder.

The foregoing detailed description has been given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A book-like binder for a zigzag folded stack of continuous form stationery wherein the folded edges thereof are random spaced forming an edge of the stack appromixmating a plane transverse to the form lengths of the stack, comprising: a sheet of relatively stiff material having a backbone strip and a front and back cover hingedly secured thereto; and a plurality of tubes having adhesive therein, said tubes positioned on one surface of said backbone strip for contacting all the random spaced folded edges of one side of said stack of stationery when said stack is placed thereupon in upright position on the folded edges thereof, said adhesive of a depth to permit penetration of the most protruding edge of stationery therein while sufiiciently contacting the least protruding edge thereof to grip all of the edges and secure the stack in the binder in book form, said tubes having selectively removable cover means to expose the liquid adhesive therein to said folded edges to secure the stack in the binder in book form.

2. A book-like binder for a zigzag folded stack of continuous form stationery wherein the folded edges thereof are random spaced forming an edge of the stack approximating a plane transverse to the form lengths of the stack, comprising: a sheet of relatively stiff material having a backbone strip and a front and back cover hingedly secured thereto; and a tube having liquid adhesive therein, said tube positioned on one surface of said backbone strip for contacting the random spaced folded edges of one side of said folded stack of stationery, said tube having a removable cover for exposing the liquid adhesive therein and said adhesive of a depth to permit penetration of the most protruding edge of stationery therein while sufliciently contacting the least protruding edge thereof to grip all of the edges and secure the stack in the binder in book form, so that a zigzag folded stock of stationery with irregular folded edges may be secured to the binder in book form when the edges are brought in contact with adhesive.

3. A book-like binder for securing sheets of stationery therein about the edges thereof, comprising: a sheet of relatively stiff material having a backbone strip and a front and back cover hingedly secured thereto; and a tube having liquid adhesive therein, said tube positioned on one surface of said backbone strip to contact the edges of said stationery, said adhesive of a sufificient depth to permit penetration of the most protruding edge of stationery therein while sufiiciently contacting the least protruding edge thereof to grip all of the edges and secure the stack in the binder in book form, said tube having a cover for maintaining the liquid glue out of contact with fie air, said cover being removable to expose said liquid adhesive to the air so that individual leaves of stationery may be positioned thereagaiust and bound in the binder in book form as the glue sets in response to exposure to the air.

References Cited by the Examiner FOREIGN PATENTS 851,416 10/39 France. 671,229 2/39 Germany.

JEROME SCHNALL, Primary Examiner. LAWRENCE CHARLES, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
DE671229C *Feb 7, 1937Feb 3, 1939Willy SalchowVerfahren und Ausfuehrungsform des Verfahrens zum buchmaessigen Verbinden loser Blaetter
FR851416A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3460854 *Aug 11, 1967Aug 12, 1969Koelling Wilford KAbsentee ballot device
US3717366 *Jun 23, 1971Feb 20, 1973W DeckerMethod and apparatus used for book binding
US3825964 *Apr 17, 1973Jul 30, 1974Velo Bind IncDevice and method for casing books
US3833244 *Apr 2, 1973Sep 3, 1974Heimann EgonAdhesive binding cover
US3847718 *Nov 1, 1971Nov 12, 1974Xerox CorpAdhesive binding means for edge binding assembled pages together in book fashion
US3964770 *Feb 3, 1975Jun 22, 1976Velo-Bind, Inc.Case for book with pressure sensitive resilient spine pad
US4091487 *Nov 24, 1975May 30, 1978Axelrod Herbert RMethod for binding books
US4194832 *Dec 30, 1977Mar 25, 1980Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.Consecutive copying and bookbinding method and its apparatus
US4673324 *May 19, 1986Jun 16, 1987Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod and sheet for binding pages
US4697970 *May 19, 1986Oct 6, 1987Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCover for binding sheets
US4702659 *May 19, 1986Oct 27, 1987Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyBacking for binding sheets
US4793758 *May 19, 1986Dec 27, 1988Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCover for binding sheets
US5052872 *Jun 1, 1989Oct 1, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyManual sheet binding structure and method
US5407230 *Jul 30, 1993Apr 18, 1995Waldorf CorporationPrint folder
US5678861 *Jul 18, 1996Oct 21, 1997Werner; Richard S.System for binding sheet like articles
US6036229 *Feb 23, 1998Mar 14, 2000Unibind (Cyprus) LimitedFile binder
US8182188 *Dec 19, 2008May 22, 2012Eastman Kodak CompanyBook and a method of making same
US20130015649 *Jul 5, 2012Jan 17, 2013John Thomas ParkerPublication and method of making a publication
USRE28758 *Jun 11, 1974Apr 6, 1976 Method and apparatus used for book binding
EP0869012A1 *Feb 13, 1998Oct 7, 1998Unibind (Cyprus) Limited"Improvements to binding files".
Classifications
U.S. Classification281/21.1
International ClassificationB42D3/00, B42D1/04, B42D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42D1/04, B42D3/002
European ClassificationB42D3/00B, B42D1/04