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Publication numberUS3211825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1965
Filing dateApr 10, 1964
Priority dateApr 10, 1964
Publication numberUS 3211825 A, US 3211825A, US-A-3211825, US3211825 A, US3211825A
InventorsClos Rene J
Original AssigneeInternat Oil Burner Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Raceway-type stud insert shield for electrical conductors, and the like
US 3211825 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 12, 1965 R. J. CLOS RACEWAY-TYPE STUD INSERT SHIELD FOR ELECTRIC CONDUGTORS, AND THE LIKE Filed April 10, 1964 INVENTOR. REA E J CZQS BY w AUORA/E'Y United States Patent RACEWAY-TYPE srun INSERT SHIELD FOR ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS, AND THE LIKE Rene J. Clos, Battle Creek, Mich., assignor to International Oil Burner Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Apr. 10, 1964, Ser, No. 358,882 7 Claims. (Cl. 174-48) The present invention relates generally to a racewaytype shield for electrical conductors and the like, to be inserted in wall studs of mobile homes, and more particularly to a one-piece shield having integral anchoring means.

In the construction of hollow walls for mobile homes, the exterior wall sheet, usually metal sheets such as aluminum, and the interior sheets, which may be a decorative interior sheet of plywood, are secured by means of nails, staples, screws, and the like, to closely spaced wooden studs which support and substantially reinforce the walls. Electrical conductors are customarily installed within the walls by stringing them through notched-out grooves provided in the studs.

Because of the close spacing of the wooden studs, it is diificult to bore holes through them in the direction in which the electrical conductors are to be strung. Therefore, to expedite assembly of walls, a routing tool is passed over the inside surface of the wooden studs, thereby providing the notched-out grooves which receive the electrical wires.

To prevent randomly spaced nails staples, and the like, from piercing the insulation of the electrical conductors and short circuiting them, it has been found that sheet metal shields may advantageously be inserted in the notched-out grooves to protect the conductors. However, if tubular shields were used, they could be inserted in the notched-out grooves only before the wires were strung therethrough. The resulting threading operation was thus extremely time consuming. Another problem was that the notched-out grooves were not uniform in their dimensions and the tolerances between the grooves and shields resulted in the shields slipping from the grooves before the structural sheets could be fastened to the studs. To overcome this problem, some time-consuming method might be required to affix the shields to the studs.

The general purpose of this invention is to provide a novel shield for electrical conductors adapted to be readily inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a structural sheet is to be fastened. Among the specific objects is the provision of a metal shield having sufficient structural strength to prevent penetration by fasteners, which may be readily manufactured as a one-piece member with integral anchoring means; a shield which on installation is positively anchored to a Wooden stud regardless of tolerances therebetween; and which may readily be hammered into a vertical-sided stud after the electircal conductors to be housed therein have been strung through notchedout grooves in the stud.

In the present invention these purposes (as well as others apparent herein) are achieved generally by providing a one-piece shield of the raceway, or open channel type, adapted to be inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a structural sheet is to be fastened. The shield consists of an elongated sheet metal strip of sufiicient structural strength to prevent penetration by the sheet fasteners, having two substantially right angle bends which join two substantially parallel-extending flanges to a common bottom wall, thereby presenting a generally U-shaped cross-section. The shield is further provided with an integral sheet metal tab depending from one end of the bottom wall. This depending tab has an integrally pointed cleat extending substantially perpendicular there- "ice from, pointing inwardly of the end of the bottom wall. The depending tab and the pointed cleat positively anchor the one-piece shield to the stud.

Utilization of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the disclosure made in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a sheet metal layout of the raceway-type shield of the present invention, the construction lines I, m, and n indicating the fold lines thereof;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the shield showing its configuration after the bending operations along the fold lines have been performed;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the shield of FIG. 2 taken along the line 3-3;

FIG. 4 is a side view, partially in cross-section, of a vertical-sided stud having a notched-out groove into which electrical conductors and the shield of the present invention are inserted, and to which the inner and outer wall structural sheets have been attached by fasteners; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the shield of the present invention showing a modified attachment means therefor.

Referring now to the drawing, wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1, the flat sheet metal layout for a one piece raceway-type shield, generally designated 10. The sheet layout is an elongated metal strip of suflicient structural strength to prevent penetration by commonly employed fasteners used to attach the structural sheets to wall studs in mobile homes. It has been found that 16 gauge cold rolled steel will prevent penetration by such fasteners.

. The elongated sheet metal strip of FIG. 1 is bent along the fold lines I to form the two substantially right angle bends 12 and 14, shown best in FIG. 3. The right angle bends 12 and 14 join the two substantially parallel-extending flanges 16 and .18 to a common flat bottom wall 20. As can be seen in FIG. 3, the shield 10 takes on a generally U-shaped cross-section provided by the right angle bends 12 and 14.

Means integral with the bottom wall 20 of the onepiece shield are provided for anchoring it securely to a vertical side of the stud referred to hereinabove. This integral anchoring means comprises a sheet metal tab 22 and a pointed cleat 24. The sheet metal tab 22 is integral with that portion of the elongated metal strip which forms the bottom wall 20 of the shield. Upon bending this tab 22 along the fold line m, it depends from one end of the bottom Wall 20 to spacedly position the pointed cleat 24 therebelow. The pointed cleat 24 which provides the means for attaching the shield 10 to the stud, is integral with the sheet metal tab 22, as can be seen in FIG. 1. Upon bending the cleat 24 along the fold line n, it extends substantially perpendicularly from the tab 22 and inwardly of the end of the bottom wall 20.

The depending ab 22, as shown in FIG. 3 is preferably positioned nearer the flange which on installation, will be adjacent to the outer end of the notched-out groove in which the shield 10 is to be installed. As here illustrated, the tab 22 is positioned nearer the flange 16 than the flange 18, with the pointed cleat 24 positioned on the inner side edge 25 of the tab 22. By so positioning the depending tab 22 and pointed cleat 24, easy access is had to the outer side of the tab, thereby permitting it to be hammered into the stud. Also by positioning the pointed cleat along the vertical plane a-a lying midway between the flanges 16 and 18, its tendency to misalign within the grooves upon hammering (as might be the case where the pointed cleat was not symmetrically located) is lessened. However the depending tab may be located at -studs permits easy access thereto.

hollow wall of a mobile home.

any other suitable position where the space between the Also, the pointed cleat 24 may be positioned to either side of the plane aa provided there will be a sufficient bite without splitting the wooden stud. In other words, the pointed cleat 24 should be positioned sufficiently inward of the flange 16 so that When hammered into the wooden stud, it will not split it.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is shown a shield similar to that of FIGS. 1-3 but having a modified anchoring means. Here the depending tab 22 of the shield is provided with a pair of integral pointed cleats 24 which extend symmetrically with respect to the edges 26 and 28. These tabs extend inwardly of the one end of the bottom wall 20. The depending tab 22 as shown in FIG. 5 also has a third integral sheet metal cleat 30 which extends from the horizontal bottom edge 31 of the tab 22 and inwardly of the one end of the bottom wall 20. This modified anchoring means which includes the two symmetrically positioned pointed cleats 24' and may include the third cleat 30, has the advantage of resisting twisting moments which might be imparted to the shield 10 by tugging on the electrical conductors after they have been inserted therein. The symmetrically disposed tabs 24 reinforce each other to resist such moments and assure positive attachment of the shield 10.

Referring now to FIG. 4 to illustrate the manner of installation, there is shown a wooden stud 32 used in a This stud 32 is provided with a notched-out groove 34 into which the electrical conductors 36 are strung. After the wires 36 have been strung through the groove 34, the raceway-type shield 10 is inserted by slipping it from below, around the conductors 36. The shield 10 is then positioned within the notched-out groove 34 with the pointed cleat 24 contacting the surface of the vertical-sided stud at tab 22 and substantially perpendicularly from the side its pointed end. The other end of the cleat 24 and the tab 22 are exposed for hammering. Hammering drives the pointed cleat 24 into the wooden stud 32 to positively anchor the shield 10 therein. Next the inner and outer structural sheets 38 and 40 are attached to the wooden stud 32 by randomly driven nails, staples, screws or the like, as indicated generally at 42. Any fastener which is driven toward the electrical conductor 36 will be diverted by the raceway-type shield 10.

From the foregoing disclosure it may be seen that the present invention provides a unique raceway-type shield for electrical conductors which may be readily inserted into wooden studs and anchored positively thereto without the necessity of additional fasteners.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. For example, many combinations of pointed cleats 24 and their positioning along one edge of the shield 10 may be envisioned. It is therefore to be understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

I claim:

1. A one-piece shield for electrical conductors adapted to be inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a strucural sheet is to be fastened, comprising an elongated-sheet metal strip of sufficient structural strength to prevent penetration by the sheet fasteners, said metal having two substantially right angle bends therein, said bends joining two substantially parallel-extending flanges to a common bottom wall,

l substantially perpendicularly from the side edges of said tab and inwardly of said one end of said bottom wall.

2. A one-piece shield for electrical conductors adapted to be inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a structural sheet is to be fastened, comprising an elongated sheet metal strip of sufficient structural strength to prevent penetration by the sheet fasteners, said metal strip having two substantially right angle bends therein, said bends joining two substantially parallel-extending flanges to a common bottom wall, whereby a generally U-shaped cross-section is provided, and

' means integral with said bottom wall for anchoring said one-piece shield securely to a vertical side of such stud, said means comprising a sheet metal tab integral with said bottom wall and depending from one end thereof, and

attachment means integral therewith.

3. The one-piece shield of claim 2, wherein said anchoring means integral with said depending tab comprises a pointed cleat extending substantially perpendicular therefrom and inwardly of said one end of said bottom wall.

4. The one-piece shield of claim 3, wherein said pointed cleat is positioned in a vertical plane lying midway between said flanges.

5. A one-piece shield of claim 3, wherein said sheet metal tab integral with said bottom wall is positioned nearer one said flange than the other said flange, and said pointed cleat extends inwardly from one side of said tab.

6. A one-piece shield for electrical conductors adapted to be inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a structural sheet is to be fastened, comprising an elongated sheet metal strip of sufficient structural strength to prevent penetration by the sheet fasteners, said metal strip having two substantially right angle bends therein, said bends joining two substantially parallel extending flanges to a common bottom wall whereby a generally U-shaped cross-section is provided,

a sheet metal tab integral with one end of said bottom wall and depending therefrom, and having a horizontal bottom edge, and a sheet metal cleat integral with said depending tab and extending from said bottom edge in a direction inwardly of one end of said bottom wall.

7. A one-piece shield for electrical conductors adapted to be inserted in a vertical-sided stud over which a structural sheet is to be fastened, comprising an elongated sheet metal strip of sufficient structural strength to prevent penetration by the sheet fasteners, said metal strip having two substantially right angle bends therein, said bends joining two substantially parallel extending flanges to a common bottom wall whereby a generally U-shaped crosssection is provided,

a sheet metal tab integral with one end of said bottom wall and depending therefrom, and having verticalside edges and a horizontal bottom edge, and

three sheet metal cleats integral with said depending tab and extending inwardly of one edge of said bottom wall, two of said pointed cleats being symmetrical about a vertical plane lying midway between said two flanges and at the same level and extending from said side edges, the other of said three pointed cleats extending from said bottom edge.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,115,000 4/38 Abbott l7448 JOHN F. BURNS, Primary Examiner. DARRELL L. CLAY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2115000 *Jun 10, 1935Apr 26, 1938Abbott Charles WWiring system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3297815 *Sep 3, 1964Jan 10, 1967Active Tool & Mfg CoWire clip to engage recess in stud
US3350501 *Jan 19, 1966Oct 31, 1967Automated Building ComponentsCable protector
US3515797 *Jul 10, 1968Jun 2, 1970Hochstetler Levi JElectrical wiring protector
US3689681 *Sep 29, 1971Sep 5, 1972Searer Glenn VConductor protecting fixture
US4050205 *Dec 6, 1976Sep 27, 1977Ligda John PProtective shield for utility opening in a building framing member
US4332429 *Dec 3, 1979Jun 1, 1982General Electric CompanyHousehold refrigerator and method of construction
US5163254 *Dec 19, 1990Nov 17, 1992Zastrow Thomas SStud shield
US6378255 *Oct 30, 2000Apr 30, 2002Steelcase Development CorporationFurniture construction including adjustable mounting bracket
US6390420Jan 8, 1999May 21, 2002James E. RooneyElectrician's clip and method of using
US6642445 *Jan 16, 2003Nov 4, 2003Thomas & Betts International, Inc.Cable protector plate
US8087203 *Sep 23, 2009Jan 3, 2012Pdc Facilities, Inc.Waveguide for a radio frequency door
US8191323Mar 16, 2006Jun 5, 2012Turner Bruce HCable protection sleeve for building framing
US8633404Feb 26, 2010Jan 21, 2014Hubbell IncorporatedGangable nail plate
US20140007542 *Sep 12, 2013Jan 9, 2014Everett L. LakodukRemodeling cable protecting plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/507, 52/220.7, 220/3.6, 52/27
International ClassificationH02G3/34, H02G3/30
Cooperative ClassificationH02G3/286
European ClassificationH02G3/28W