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Publication numberUS3211854 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1965
Filing dateNov 14, 1961
Priority dateNov 14, 1961
Publication numberUS 3211854 A, US 3211854A, US-A-3211854, US3211854 A, US3211854A
InventorsBengtsson Bertil S
Original AssigneeSigma Instruments Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electro-magnetic relay utilizing spring clip means to facilitate assembly of the relay
US 3211854 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 12, 1965 B. s. BENGTSSON 3,211,854

ELECTED-MAGNETIC RELAY UTILIZING SPRING CLIP MEANS TO FACILITATE ASSEMBLY OF THE RELAY 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed NOV. 14, 1961 INVENTOR. Berti S Bengrsson mo/wJXa W 5 92cm.

ATTORNEYS.

Oct. 12, 1965 B. s. BENGTSSON 3,211,854

IC RELAY UTILIZING SPR ELECTRO-MAGNET CLIP MEANS TO FACILITATE ASSEMBLY OF THE LAY Filed Nov. 14, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG.I3

FIG.I4

I43 INVEN TOR. Bert il 8 Bengisson BY 9mm. mm a may ATTORNEYS.

Oct. 12, 1965 B. s. BENGTSSON 3,211,854

ELECTRO-MAGNETIC RELAY UTILIZING SPRING CLIP MEANS TO FACILITATE ASSEMBLY OF THE RELAY 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed NOV. 14, 1961 FIG-22 76' INVENTOR.

FIG.2O

Berti! S.Beng'rsson BY ATTOR N EYS.

Oct. 12, 1965 B. s. BENGTSSON 3,211,354

ELECTED-MAGNETIC RELAY UTILIZING SPRING CLIP MEANS TO FACILITATE ASSEMBLY OF THE RELAY Filed Nov. 14, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG.32

INVENTOR Berti! S Bengtsson United States Patent O ELECTRO-MAGNETIC RELAY UTILIZING SPRING CLIP MEANS T FACILITATE ASSEMBLY OF THE RELAY Bertil S. Bengtsson, Scituate, Mass., assignor to Sigma Instruments, Inc., a corporation of Massachusetts Filed Nov. 14, 1961, Ser. No. 152,261 17 Claims. (Cl. 200-87) This invention relates to electro-rnagnetic devices and particularly to relays suitable for general industrial use. Broadly stated, the objects of the invention are to provide a relay having long life, high switching capacity, high reliability, low manufacturing cost, and of such dimensions and characteristics as to be interchangeable with the largest number of competitive relays intended for use under comparable conditions.

A more specific and very important object of the present invention is to eliminate as far as possible the internal wiring in the relay. Much of the available space inside the relay envelope has, in prior constructions, been occupied by wiring between the terminals of the relay proper and its base or plug-in termination. The wiring which has been heretofore required, aside from being space-consuming, is costly, and many solder points are required which are a constant source of trouble, possible breakdown and increased resistance. In the construction of the present invention most of the internal wiring and soldered joints are eliminated. It has thus been possible to utilize the available space in the relay envelope so that, without enlarging over-all dimensions, it has been possible to lengthen the flexible members of the switches, thus permitting a larger cross section for a given spring characteristic. This has made possible reduction of the total contact resistance of the relay, terminal to terminal. This decrease in resistance is in addition to that secured by the elimination of many of the soldered joints required in previous constructions.

In preferred constructions embodying the present invention the switch or switches and the electro magnetic actuating elements are separable. This facilitates the assembly of the relay. The construction is also such that stress reversal in the flexible switch members is avoided, as the contact fingers of the switch members are not secured to the armature so that they do not follow the armature through the over-travel part of its stroke. This tends to flatten the load curve of the armature, which is important when continuity is required in the movement or stroke of the armature. It also reduces the armature chatter in the case of alternating current actuation.

The fact that the armature is not fastened to the switch elements also permits the mass of the armature to be reduced. This, in turn, reduces the impact of the armature against the pole face of the magnetic core. Wear on the armature suspension is also reduced. Less kinetic energy is stored in the moving parts, resulting in less bounce of the armature. Also, due to the separation of the switch and actuator, the bounce of the armature against the core is not transmitted to the moving contacts of the switches.

Other important features of the invention in its preferred embodiment relate to an improved armature suspension with minimum friction and improved means for permitting and maintaining correct and accurate adjustment of the armature.

Another important feature of construction which is preferably embodied in the structure of the present invention is the formation of various parts so as to include within the parts themselves fastening means by which the parts may be assembled. These formations cooperate with formations on other parts and particularly with 3,211,854 Patented Oct. 12, 19 65 spring clips by which the parts may be secured. The use of welding or soldering in joining parts is minimized and conventional fastening means such as screws, bolts or rivets are wholly or largely eliminated. Valuable space is thus saved, the expense and nuisance of handling many small parts is reduced, and the danger of screws and nuts becoming loosened during use is avoided.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear in the course of the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof. One such preferred embodiment is illustrated in the accompanying drawings. These drawings show a double pole, double throw electromagnetic relay which may be provided in forms for either A.C. or DC. operation. Many features of the invention are obviously applicable to other forms of relay and some of the features are useful in connection with other types of electromagnetic or switching apparatus. The applicability of the various inventive features disclosed is therefore not to be taken as limited to the particular type of relay illustrated.

In the drawings FIG. 1 is a front elevation of the relay of the type above referred to, the envelope being shownin section;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the relay shown in FIG. 1, the envelope illustrated being of transparent material such as plastic;

FIG. 3 is a rear elevation of the relay shown in FIG.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of the relay viewed at right angles to the position shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the pin base of the relay;

FIG. 6 is a side elevation of the pin base;

FIG. 7 is a bottom plan view of the pin base;

FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 are transverse sections of the pin base taken on lines 8, 9 and 10, respectively, of FIG. 5;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the relay base;

FIG. 12 is a bottom plan view of the relay base;

FIG. 13 is a front elevation of the relay base, partly in vertical section;

FIGS. 14 and 15 are vertical sectional views on lines 14-44 and 15-45, respectively, of FIGS. 12 and 13;

FIG. 16 is a front elevation of the coil and its bobbin;

FIG. 17 is a side elevation of the coil and bobbin;

FIG. 18 is a plan view of the pin base with the relay base assembled thereon, the contact brackets carrying their contact elements being shown in position on their respective bases;

FIG. 19 is a vertical section on line 1919 of FIG. 18 showing the relay base mounted on the pin base;

FIGS. 20 [and 21 are plan views of the contact brackets which are to be mounted on the pin base;

FIGS. 22 and 23 are plan views of the terminal brackets which are also to be mounted on the pin base;

FIG. 24 is a :side elevation of the terminal bracket shown in FIG. 23;

FIG. 25 is a fragmentary view in rear elevation of the upper part of the vertical arm of the terminal bracket shown in FIG. 24;

FIG, 26 is a side elevation of the opposite side of the relay from that shown in FIG. 4 with the relay envelope removed;

FIG. 27 is a side elevation of the armature viewed from the side facing the coil;

FIGS. 28 and 29 are views in plan and side elevation, respectively, of the bridge; 3

FIGS. 30 land 31 :are views in plan and side elevation respectively, of an auxiliary retaining clip;

FIG. 32 is a plan view of the armature stop;

FIG. 33 a fragmentary vertical sectional View showing a portion of the bridge, armature stop and the upper part of the armature engaged therewith illustrating the such as thenno-setting phenolic plastic.

knife edge pivotal contact between the edge of the tarma- Itu're flange and the armature stop;

FIG. 34 is a side elevation of the main retaining clip showing the curvature of the top of the clip before the clip has been pressed down to functional position;

FIG. 35 is a side elevation of the clip shown in FIG. 34, parts being broken away;

FIG. 36 is a side elevation of one of the armature springs;

FIG. 37 is a side elevation of one of the spring contacts before being assembled;

FIG. 38 is a front elevation of the same;

FIG. 39 is a side elevation of a tubular terminal pin for attachment to a coil wire, parts being shown in sec- FIG. 40 is a side elevation of a terminal pin for attachment to a contact bracket or terminal bracket, partly broken away; and

FIG. 41 is a side elevation of an insulating plate tor attachment to the armature,

Retenring to the drawings in detail, the illustrated embodiment of the invention is a double pole, double throw relay. The relay embodies a base 50 of insulating material carrying terminal pins 52, 52a, and 52b arranged to fit in a conventional socket (not shown). Mounted on the base are a pair of normally open contacts 54 and normally closed contacts 56. These are engaged alternately by movable contacts 58 carried on contact springs 60. The contact springs are actuated by a pivoted armature 62 moved by an electr c-magnet having a core 64 surrounded by a coil 66. When the coil is de-energized the armature is moved away from the pole face of the core by armature tension-lug springs 68 so that the movable contacts 8 engage the normally closed contacts 56. When the coil is energized, the armature moves so as to relieve the pressure on the springs 60, which are prestressed so as to move the contacts '58 into engagement with the normally open contacts '54.

A novel construction of base is provided in which soldered connections are eliminated and also the use of screws and bolts.

The base is made in two pieces of insulating material The lower of these pieces, 70, comprises a pin base from which the terminals 52, 52a, and 52b project, while the upper piece 7 2 may be termed the relay base. The pin base is shown as having a guide pin 71 molded integral therewith. On

the pin base are mounted the brackets '74 carrying upwardly projecting arms 76 to which are fixed the movable contact springs 60. Also carried by the pin base are the brackets 78 carrying the normally closed contacts 56. The brackets 78 are separated from the brackets '74 by pieces of insulating material 82 (FIG. 19). Mounted on the relay base are brackets 84 carrying the normally open contacts 54, The pin base has a flange or shoulder portion 86 in which lugs 88 on the relay base fit. The pin base 70 land the relay base 72 and brackets '84 are all permanently clamped together by certain of the terminal pins 52, which are provided midway their length with flanges 90 fitting in sockets 92 in the bottom of the pin base and which have shank portions 94 extending through holes in the pin base 7 0 and up through matching holes in the relay base 72. The upper end-s of the shanks are spun or flanged over as indicated at 96. The relay base is narrower than the pin base terminating at the line 98 (FIG. 18) so as to leave a space through which project upwardly the springoarrying bracket portions 76 and the contact carryin-g portions 78 which carry the contacts 56. The brackets 78 are clamped against the insulating pieces 82 which, in turn, bear on the bracket 74, these parts being held in firm contact by pins 52a, the shanks 94a of which are shorter than the shanks 94 of pins 52.

The shanks of the terminal pins are of such diameter in relation to the sizes of the holes in the respective terminal brackets mounted thereon that the shanks have to be forced through the holes with substantial pressure. The force fit thus obtained insures good electrical contact without soldering. The shank diameter should be sufiiciently larger than the hole diameter to result in substantial stressing of the metal so that a tight contact is maintained under all temperature conditions to which the instrument will be subjected.

The pin base, in addition to having the marginal flange 86, has a central partition wall '100 terminating at its *front end in a lug 3102, the flange and lug being slightly higher than the marginal flange 86. Also projecting upward from the pin base are cylindrical projections 103- which have tapered sockets 104 therein communicating with holes 4106. Hollow pins 52b having flanges 108 are mounted in holes. The relay base fits on top of the pin base as above described and it has a groove 110 in its lower face which receives the upper edge of the partition 100 so as to seal oil the spaces between the bases in which the two contact systems are mounted. The relay base also has two large holes 112 in which the upper edges of the projections :103 are received. The relay base also has an upwardly projecting flange extending around three sides and comprising a back wall 114 and side walls 116, the walls 116 each have a projection 118 on its outer side which is in the form of an inverted wedge the base of which forms a shoulder 120. The rear part of the relay base between the flanges 114 and 116 is raised so as to form two shoulders or seat portions 122 and also a raised dividing lug 124.

The contact springs 60 are of inverted U shape having legs 126 which are fixed to the arms 76 of the brackets 74. The arms 76 are shown as provided with holes 128 which receive outwardly bent lugs 130 on the lower ends of the spring legs 126. The arms 76 also have tongues 132 (FIGS. 24, 25) bent inwardly near their upper ends, and the spring legs 126 have tongues 134 (FIGS. 37, 38) bent outwardly so as to slide behind the tongues 132. The springs are thus held firmly by slipping the tongues 134 into position and the lugs 130 into the holes 128. The long outer legs 136 of the contact springs have fixed to their ends the movable contacts 58.

In devices of the lower ratings where current values are not too great, the mounting of the contact springs by means of the lugs and tongues described, forms a low resistance conection so that no other fastening means between the springs and the arms 76 of the brackets is required. This is advantageous because the assembly is very quickly effected without the use of any special tools and also the contact springs may be readily detached from the brackets for adjustment or replacement. Where high surrents are involved, it may be desirable to weld or solder the springs to the brackets. In this case, the lug and tongue connections described facilitate the welding and soldering by holding the springs in proper position during such operations.

The base section comprising the pin base, relay base, pins carried thereby which also secure the base parts together, the fixed contact brackets and movable contact brackets and springs carried thereby, constitute a complete sub-assembly (FIG. 19) which may be put together by spinning over the ends of the pins as above described (and by Welding the contact springs to their brackets, Where this is needed).

The coil 66 is wound on a plastic spool or bobbin 140, having rectangular flanges 142 which fit between the flanges 114 and 116 of the relay base and rest on the shoulders 122. The terminal Wires 143 from the coil 66 are passed down through the tubular studs 52b and are soldered at their lower ends to the bottoms of such studs, these being the only soldered joints in the relay. The sockets 104 guide and protect the wires and provide adequate spacing so that short circuiting is prevented The armature and its supporting and pivoting means are assembled and mounted on the base sub-assembly by the use of spring clips and without the employment of conventional fastening means such as screws, bolts, or rivets. A bridge member 144 (FIGS. 28, 29) fits over the coil spool having a top 146, two short front flanges 148 engaging the front spool flange 142 and a long back flange 150 pressing firmly against the rear pole face of the core 64, such face being enlarged so as to form a flange 152 engaging the back spool flange 142. If the relay is for use with alternating current the core is usually laminated and may be provided with a shading coil 154.

On the top 146 of the bridge is placed a plate constituting what may be termed an armature stop 160 (FIG. 32) which has a face 162 against which bears the bearing or pivot edge 164 of the flange 166 of the armature 62. The coil 66 and its spool 140, the bridge member 144 and the armature stop 160 are all firmly held in position by spring clip means including a spring clip or retaining clip 170 (FIGS. 34, 35) which has sides or legs 172 which are cut out at 174 so as to leave cross pieces 176 at their lower ends. The ends of the armature stop and, the top of the bridge member are provided with tabs 177 which fit in the cutouts 174. The top of the retaining clip is a downwardly curved plate 178 which bears on armature stop 160. The retaining clip is made of spring metal and the lower ends of the side walls or legs 172 pass outside of the walls 116 of the relay base. The clip is pressed down until the cross pieces 176 snap under the shoulders 120 at the bottoms of the wedges 118 thereby retaining the parts specified in position and under the pressure of the spring top plate 178.

The parts are further secured in position by an auxiliary spring clip 180 (FIGS. 30, 31) which has an inwardly curved back 182 and sides 184 terminating in hook portions 186. After the retaining clip 170 has been secured as described, the clip 180 is snapped in place with the curved back 182 partly straightened and pressing against the flange 150 of the bridge member (FIG. 26) and the hook portions engaged with portions of the retaining clip at one side of the slots 174.

The clip 180 thus performs two functions. It prevents CPI the separation of the legs of the retaining clip 170 and thus ensures firm permanent engagement of the latter with the relay base and it also holds the bridge member 14.4 in solid contact with back of the core 64. A low reluctance magnetic contact is thus secured without welding or brazing. This simplifies assembly and, more importantly, assures a better magnetic circuit than is usually attainable by welding. When a core, particularly a laminated core is welded to a backing member, the welding process may upset the molecular structure of the core so as to counteract the effects of heat treatment or annealing to which the core elements had been subjected.

The armature 62 is tensioned by a pair of wire springs 68 (FIG. 36) which have offset bent ends 192 which fit in holes 194 in the armature and extend across the top plate 178 of the retaining clip 170. The ends of the spring are formed into hooks 195 which are received in notches or spring rests 196 in the plate 178. To facilitate assembly the plate 178 is provided with a temporary spring rest notch 198 (FIG. 2) which is deeper than the notches 196. The ends of the spring may be engaged in this notch 198 without stressing the spring. Then the assembly is completed by sliding the ends of the spring outward into the spring rests 196. The spring rest notches 196 hold the springs in position and are deep enough to allow the hooks to move slightly so as to follow the motion of the armature. The inclined surfaces 200 permit the springs to be moved from the temporary spring rest notch 198 to the spring rest 196, permitting the move ment of the springs to be accomplished without overstress during the assembly. The springs are formed so that when mounted, they are under the necessary tension to properly control the armature. They should not be stretched or distorted during assembly. If adjustment of the spring tension is required, this is accomplished by tweaking the springs with a pair of pliers.

The bearing face 162 of the armature stop and adjacent face of the armature flange are so formed as to provide a clearance angle (FIG. 33). This permits of a knife edge contact between the armature flange and the stop so that friction and wear are negligible. In the con struction illustrated the face of the armature stop is inclined at a small angle (i.e. 14) from the vertical so that the armature pivots about the knife edge corner 164 without any shifting or rubbing action.

The armature stop plate 160 is also formed with deep slots 202 in its ends. By the use of a suitable tool these may be widened or narrowed thereby permitting adjustment of the angularity of the bearing face 162 transversely of the relay. This adjustment permits the armature face to be brought into exact parallelism with the pole face of the magnet and also permits the spacing of the armature and pole face to be accurately adjusted.

The armature is prevented from lateral displacement by means of a tab 204 bent from the top plate 178 of the retaining clip which is received in a notch 206 in the edge of the armature flange 166. The point of engagement of the tab and notch is close to the axis of pivotal movement of armature so that the relative movement between the engaging surfaces of the tab and notch is very small and friction is a minimum.

The armature is insulated from the contact springs 60 by a layer of insulating material 208 (FIG. 41) which is supported by the ends of springs 68.

The relay is preferably enclosed in a dust cover or envelope 211 which may be of plastic or metal. This may be provided with ribs 212 inside its lower edge which snap under the rim 214 of the pin base 70.

The construction also provides for very easy assembly. The contact brackets and the base portions are readily assembled and held together by spinning over the heads of the contact pins. The coil is then placed and the coil wires passed through the hollow pins and soldered. All the other parts are then assembled by means of spring clips without the use of any bolts, nuts, rivets or special tools. The assembly is thus not only quickly completed, but there are no nuts or screws that can possibly become detached no matter how long the relay is continued in service. A very durable and trouble-free construction results.

While but one specific embodiment of this invention has been shown and described in detail, it will be understood that many variations may be made in the construction and that many features of the invention are capable of being used without others in different types of devices. It is desired, therefore, to cover the invention in whatever form its principles may be embodied.

Iclaim:

1. An electro-magnetic relay comprising a base of insulating material, a contact bracket assembly mounted on said base, an electro-magnetic motor assembly including a coil, core and movable armature, a bridge member having a top fitted over the top of said coil and having a flat flange engaging the front of said electro-magnetic motor assembly and a back flange pressing firmly against said core, an armature stop positioned on the top of said bridge, said electro-magnetic motor assembly having a flange extending from a side of said coil around said bridge into abutment with said stop, spring clip means having portions interlocking with said insulating base and biasing said stop and said bridge member against said electro-magnetic 'motor assembly and holding said armature with said bridge member and said stop in an assembled position, said spring clip means constituting the sole means for securing said electro-magnetic motor to said base, said insulating base having clip holding formations thereon, said spring clip means including an inverted U-shaped spring clip extending over the coil and armature assembly and having formations on the lower ends of the legs thereof interlocking with the formations on the base, and an auxiliary clip engaging the legs of the U-shaped clip so as to hold the same in engagement with the formations on the base.

2. An electro-magnetic relay having a base comprising two superimposed blocks of insulating material, the lower block constituting a pin base and having contact pins projecting from the bottom thereof for electrical connection, the upper block constituting a relay base having formations thereon for carrying a coil and armature and supporting means therefor, certain of said contact pins having shanks projecting through registering holes in said base blocks and headed at their upper ends so as to secure said base blocks together, said contact brackets being fixed to certain of said pins between said upper and lower base blocks and other contact brackets being fixed to certain of said pins and located on top of the upper base block.

3. An electro-magnetic relay comprising a base of insulating material, contact bracket assemblies mounted on said base, an electromagnetic motor assembly including a coil, core and movable armature, and spring clip means. having portions interlocking with said insulating base and portions engaging said motor assembly, said spring clip means constituting the sole means for securing electromagnetic motor assembly to said base, said contact bracket being fixed to certain of said pins and located on top of the upper base block, certain of said contact brackets being mounted between the upper and lower base blocks and being provided with inverted U-shaped springs fixed thereto, said springs extending substantially above the top of the upper base block, the downwardly bent free portions of said U-shaped springs extending below the top of the upper base block and carrying movable contacts for engagement with fixed contacts carried by the brackets mounted between the upper and lower base blocks and on the upper base block.

4. In a electro-magnetic relay, a base of insulating material, switch contacts carried thereby, and an electromagnetic motor assembly mounted on said base, said motor assembly including a coil and bobbin, a magnetic core in the coil having a pole face on one side thereof and extending through the coil and projecting slightly beyond the surface of the bobbin flange at the back of the coil, an inverted U-shaped bridge mounted on the coil bobbin, an armature pivotedly mounted on top of the bridge and having a portion extending down into position to be influenced by flux from said pole face, said bridge having a downwardly extending flange contacting with the projecting rear end of the magnetic core, and spring means for pressing thebridge flange into contact with said core and. 5. An electro-magnetic relay as claimed in claim 4 in which said spring means comprise a spring clip extending transversely of said bridge flange and having a concavely curved resilient portion pressing against the outer surface of said bridge flange.

6. An electro-magnetic relay as claimed in claim 4 in which an armature stop is mounted on top of said bridge member, said armature stop having a bearing surface thereon, the armature having a flange extending partly over the top of said bridge member and having a bearing surface contacting the bearing surface of said armature stop, at least one of the bearing surfaces of said armature stop and said armature respectively being bevelled so that the armature engages the surface on the armature stop in line contact only so as to provide a knife edge engagement between the armature and the armature stop.

7. An electro-magnetic relay, a base of insulating material, switch contacts carried thereby, and an electromagnetic motor assembly mounted on said base including a coil having a magnetic core therein, a bridge member having a top extending over the coil, an armature stop mounted on top of said bridge member having a body and a contact surface carrying portion integral therewith, an armature having a flange extending partly over the top of said bridge member and having a bearing surface contacting the contact surface of said armature stop, said armature having a portion extending down intoposition to be influenced by the flux from said core, the contact surface carrying portion of said armature stop being separated from the body of said armature stop by deep slots, permitting movement of said contact surface portion of said stop with respect to the body thereof, whereby the position of the contact surface can be adjusted with corresponding adjustment of the armature with respect to the pole face of said core.

8. An electro-magnetic relay, a base, switch contacts carried thereby, and an electro-magnetic motor assembly mounted on said base including a coil having a magnetic core therein, a bridge member having a top above said coil, an armature stop mounted on top of said bridge member having a bearing surface, an armature having a flange extending partly over top of said bridge member and having a bearing surface contacting the bearing surface of said armature stop, said armature having a portion extending down into position to be influenced by the flux of said core, an inverted U-shaped spring clip for retaining said armature stop and bridge in position, and an armature spring attached to said armature at one end and extending over the top of said clip and hooked thereto at the other end.

9. An electro-magnetic relay as claimed in claim 8 in which the clip has a plurality of notches in its edge for engagement by the hooked end of the armature spring, one of said notches being deeper than the other, the edge of the clip between said notches sloping outwardly from the deeper notch to the shallower notch whereby the hooked end of the spring may be engaged in the deeper notch and moved over said inclined surface until the hooked end of the spring engages the shallower notch.

10. An electro-magnetic relay as claimed in claim 8 in which the armature has a portion engaging a spring carrying a movable contact, said contact spring being me stressed so as to urge the armature portion toward the pole face of the magnetic core, the armature spring being of sufficient strength to overcome the resistance of the contact spring and move the armature away from the pole face when the coil is de-energized.

11. An electro-magnetic relay as claimed in claim 10 in which the resultant forces to which the armature is subjected by magnetic attraction and by the action of the contact spring and armature spring substantially intersect in the pivotal axis of the armature.

12. An electro-magnetic relay comprising, a base of insulating material, a contact bracket assembly mounted on said base, an electromagnetic motor assembly including a coil having a pole face, a core and movable armature, a bridge member engaged with said pole face and having a portion extending along said coil, an armature stop mounted on a portion of said bridge member overlying said coil, a substantially L-shaped armature element including a portion overlying said bridge member with an end abutting against said armature stop and a portion extending downwardly adjacent said core, and spring clip means having portions interlocking with said insulation base and portions overlying said armature stop and said bridge, and resiliently carrying and orienting said armature.

13. An electro-magnetic relay according to claim 12, wherein said spring clip means includes a U-shaped retaining clip having side legs extending downwardly on each side of said coil and a top bridging portion which rests on said armature stop, and a spring element carried by said bridging portion and extending downwardly and resiliently connecting said armature.

14. An electro-magnetic relay, a base of insulating material, switch contacts carried on said base, an electromagnetic motor assembly mounted on said base, said motor assembly including a coil wound around a bobbin, a magnetic core in the coil having a pole face on one side thereof, said core extending through said coil, an inverted U-shaped bridge member mounted on said coil bobbin, an armature pivotally mounted on top of the bridge member and having a portion extending downwardly into position to be influenced by the flux from said pole face, and a substantially U-shaped retaining clip including leg portions extending downwardly on each side of said coil and having a bridging top portion resting against said armature stop, said bridge member locating said armature stop and said armature, and a resilient element carried by said bridge member and biasing said spring in a non-actuated position outwardly away from said core.

15. An electro-magnetic relay according to claim 14, including auxiliary spring clip means extending around an end of said bridge member adjacent said core and having side leg portions engaged around said retaining clip leg portions.

16. An electromagnetic relay comprising a base of insulating material, contact bracket assemblies mounted on said base, an electromagnetic motor assembly including a coil, core and movable armature, and spring clip means having portions interlocking with said insulating base and portions engaging said motor assembly, said spring clip means constituting the sole means for securing electro-magnetic motor assembly to said base, said insulating base including clip holding formations thereon and in which the spring clip means includes an inverted U-shaped spring clip extending over the motor assembly and having formations on the lower ends of the legs of the spring clip interlocking with the formations on the base, the sides of the legs of the spring clip being cut out to provide two downwardly extending portions connected by cross piece which interlocks with one of the formations of the base, and an auxiliary spring clip extending transversely of the legs of the inverted U-shaped spring clip having hooked portions engaging with the downwardly extending portions of the spring clip legs so as to prevent disengagement of said spring clip legs from the formations on the base.

17. An electro-magnetic relay comprising a base of insulating material, a contact bracket assembly mounted on said base, an electro-magnetic motor assembly including a 'coil, core and movable armature, a bridge member having a top fitted over the top of said coil and having a flat flange engaging the front of said electro-magnetic motor and a back flange pressing firmly against said core, an armature stop positioned on the top of said bridge, said electro-magnetic motor assembly having a flange extending from a side of said coil around said bridge into abutment with said stop, spring clip means having portions interlocking with said insulating base and biasing said stop and said bridge member against said electro-magnetic motor and holding said armature with said bridge member and said stop in an assembled position, said spring clip means constituting the sole means for securing said electro-magnetic motor to said base, and an auxiliary spring clip member extending around a side of said armature and biasing said back flange of said bridge member against said core and being engaged on each side with said spring clip means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,608,630 8/52 Harrison 200-104 2,617,846 11/52 Field 20087 2,664,455 12/53 Williamson 200168 X 2,825,782 3/58 Rhodes 20087 2,860,204 11/58 Hughes et al ZOO-87 2,866,868 12/58 Carlson et al 200168 2,919,327 12/59 Kuhn et al. 200104 2,922,013 1/60 Huflman 200--166 2,923,914 2/ Beck et a1. 339220 2,946,872 7/60 Siebers 20087 3,002,074 9/61 Eadie 200166 3,017,547 1/62 Jencks 317 3,030,460 4/62 Huetten et al 200166 3,035,137 5/62 Furnas et al. 200104 3,041,577 6/62 Elliott 339221 3,096,412 7/63 Martin 20087 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,129,730 1/57 France.

BERNARD A. GILHEANY, Primary Examiner.

ROBERT K. SCHAEFER, Examiner.

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US3002074 *Jun 8, 1959Sep 26, 1961Daystrom IncRelay contact system
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US3030460 *Sep 10, 1959Apr 17, 1962Huetten ClarenceSubminiature rotary switch
US3035137 *Sep 4, 1959May 15, 1962Furnas Electric CoMagnetic switch assemblage
US3041577 *Aug 23, 1960Jun 26, 1962Essex Wire CorpContact for electric switches
US3096412 *Apr 26, 1960Jul 2, 1963Cons Electronics IndCounterbalanced relay
FR1129730A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3406361 *May 11, 1966Oct 15, 1968Square D CoElectromagnetic relay having parts retained by a one-piece spring clip which also provides armature bias
US3611218 *Jan 30, 1970Oct 5, 1971Fujita TeizoElectromagnetic relay
US3813625 *Feb 21, 1973May 28, 1974Emerson Electric CoElectromagnet with detachable casting and non-rotatable armature
US4125887 *Mar 8, 1976Nov 14, 1978Elmeg Elektro-Mechnik GmbhSocket and relay assembly
US4137559 *Jul 1, 1977Jan 30, 1979Elmeg-Elektro-Mechanik Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungSocket assembly
US4246457 *Jan 16, 1979Jan 20, 1981Robertshaw Controls CompanyElectrical switch construction, parts therefor and methods of making the same
US4734668 *May 1, 1987Mar 29, 1988Siemens AktiengesellschaftElectromagnetic relay
EP0245798A1 *May 8, 1987Nov 19, 1987Siemens AktiengesellschaftElectromagnetic relay
Classifications
U.S. Classification335/220, 335/278, 200/245, 335/271, 335/279, 335/202
International ClassificationH01H50/02, H01H50/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01H50/041
European ClassificationH01H50/04B