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Publication numberUS3212446 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1965
Filing dateOct 18, 1962
Priority dateOct 18, 1962
Publication numberUS 3212446 A, US 3212446A, US-A-3212446, US3212446 A, US3212446A
InventorsDavis Jr Alva R, Geiger John H, Golden Robert L
Original AssigneeRobertshaw Controls Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid pump or the like and method for making the same
US 3212446 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1965 R. L. GOLDEN ETAL 3,212,446

FLUID PUMP OR THE LIKE AND METHOD FOR MAKING THE SAME Filed Oct. 18, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 v i-nun unuuunuuuWEN 0w s I5 E INVENTORS ROBERT L. GOLDEN ALVA R. DAVIS JR. BYJOHN H. GEIGER THEIR ATTORNEY Oct. 19, 1965 R. L. GOLDEN ETAL FLUID PUMP OR THE LIKE AND METHOD FOR MAKING THE SAME Filed Oct. 18. 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 III- 52 FIG-4 5'' 23 20 3| I I9 43 38 32 3O 2 f 1 FIG-5 W410 490 280 v '45 29a 3 a 530 u 3 0 &

3:9 INVENTORS ROBERT L.GOLDEN 22 26a ALVA R. DAVIS JR.

JO HN H. GElGER THEIR ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,212,446 FLUID PUMP OR THE LIKE AND METHOD FOR MAKING THE SAME Robert L. Golden, Greenburg, Pa., and Alva R. Davis,

Jr., Corona Del Mar, and John H. Geiger, Los Alamitos, Calif., assignors to Robertshaw Controls Company, a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 18, 1962, Ser. No. 231,504 14 Claims. (Cl. 103-150) This invention relates to an improved fluid pump or the like and to the method of making the same as well as to improved parts for such a fluid pump or the like.

It is well known to provide a fluid pump or the like for creating a vacuum in a system by oscillating either the inlet housing or the outlet housing of the fluid pump relative to the other housing by interconnecting the oscillating housing to an armature that is oscillated under the influence of an electromagnetic motor or the like.

For example, one such fluid pump is disclosed and claimed in the co-pending US. patent application, Serial No. 149,990, filed November 3, 1961, and entitled Diaphragm-Type Air Pump. However, the fluid pump of this invention has the number of parts thereof reduced over the number of parts of such prior known fluid pump, While the fluid pump of this invention still performs the same functions.

Further, not only are the various parts of the fluid pump of this invention so simplified that the same are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, but also the various parts of the fluid pump of this invention are so constructed and arranged that the same can be rapidly assembled together to form an effective fluid pump without requiring expensive machinery or relatively skilled labor, whereby the overall cost of the fluid pump of this invention is relatively small when compared with prior known fluid pumps.

In addition, the flexible diaphragm of the fluid pump of this invention is so constructed and arranged that the same is adapted to have its outer periphery snap fitted over an outwardly directed peripheral flange on one of the pump housings and have its inner periphery staked to the other pump housing to cooperate therewith to define a chamber between the pump housings, the diaphragm having at least one reduced cross-sectional portion disposed inboard of one of the peripheries thereof to localize bending and stretching of the diaphragm during operation thereof.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide an improved fluid pump having one or more of the novel features of this invention set forth above or hereinafter shown or described.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved method for making such a fluid pump or the like.

A further object of this invention is to provide improved parts for such a fluid pump or the like.

Other objects, uses and advantages of this invention .are apparent from a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation view of one embodiment of the fluid pump of this invention and a typical electromagnetic motor means for operating such fluid pump or the like.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary, enlarged, cross-sectional view of the fluid pump illustrated in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of the diaphragm of the pump of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 2, illustrating the fluid pump of this invention in another operating position thereof.

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIGURE 2, illustrating another embodiment of this invention.

3,212,446 Patented Oct. 19, 1965 FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURE 3, illustrating the diaphragm of the fluid pumpof FIGURE 5.

While the various features of this invention are hereinafter described and illustrated as being particularly adaptable for forming a fluid pump for creating a vacuum in a system or the like, it is to be understood that the various features of this invention can be utilized singly or in any combination thereof to provide other constructions as desired.

Therefore, this invention is not to be limited to only the embodiments illustrated in the drawings, because the drawings are merely utilized to illustrate one of the wide variety of uses of this invention.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, an improved electromagnetic motor assembly and pump assembly are generally indicated by the reference numeral 10, the electromagnetic motor assembly being disclosed and claimed in the co-pending US. patent application, Serial No. 217,856, filed August 20, 1962, and entitled Electromagnetic Device and Parts Therefor, while the fluid pump assembly 11 forms the subject matter of this invention.

Since the electromagnetic motor assembly for the fluid pump assembly 11 is fully disclosed in the aforementioned patent application, only the details thereof suflicient to disclose the operation of the fluid pump 11 will now be described.

As illustrated in FIGURE 1, a substantially C-shaped frame means 12 has opposed legs 13 and 13' substantially directed toward each other.

An electric coil 14 is disposed over the leg 13 of the frame member 12, whereby the leg 13 forms a core for the coil 14.

A leaf spring 15 is interconnected to the leg 13' of the frame 12 and carries an armature 16 which tends to move into substantial alignment with the core 13 when the coil 14 is energized and which is returned to the position illustrated in FIGURE 1 by the spring 15 when the coil 14 is deenergized, whereby the armature 16 will oscillate toward and away from the cross member 17 of the frame means 12.

The fluid pump 11 is mounted to the cross member 17 of the frame means 12 and is interconnected to the armature 16 in a manner hereinafter described to cause the fluid pump 11 to operate upon oscillating movement of the armature 16 in a manner well known in the art.

For example, the fluid pump 11 can be utilized to provide a vacuum in a pneumatic control system such as is disclosed in the aforementioned co-pending patent applications.

As illustrated in FIGURE 2, the fluid pump 11 of this invention comprises an inlet housing 18, an outlet housing 19 and a flexible diaphragm 20 having the inner periphery 21 thereof staked to the outlet housing 19 in a manner hereinafter described and an outer periphery 22 snap fitted over an outwardly directed annular flange 23 of the inlet housing 18, whereby the diaphragm 20 cooperates with the housings 18 and 19 to define a chamber 24 therebetween.

The diaphragm 20 is so interconnected to the housings 18 and 19 of the fluid pump 11 that the diaphragm 20 is placed under tension therebetween regardless of the operating positions of the fluid pump 11, as will be apparent hereinafter.

The inlet housing 18 comprises a substantially frusto conical section 25 having the outwardly directed peripheral flange 23 extending from the larger end thereof, the peripheral flange 23 having a substantially triangular crosssectional configuration.

The larger end of the frusto conical section 25 of the inlet housing 18 is interrupted by a recess or cavity 26 which has a frusto conical interior wall 27 adjacent the peripheral flange 23 for a purpose hereinafter described.

A stepped portion 28 extends from one side of the frusto conical section of the inlet housing 18 and has a bore 29 passing therethrough to interconnect the exterior of the housing 18 to the cavity 26 thereof for a purpose hereinafter described.

The extension 28 of the housing 18 is adapted to pass through a bore 30 in the frame means 12 until a flat end wall 31 of the section 25 of the housing 18 abuts against one side of the frame means 12, whereby a retaining nut 32 or the like can be threaded on the other side of the extension 28 to hold the inlet housing 18 and, thus, the pump assembly 11 to the frame means 12.

An annular valve seat 33 is formed in-the cavity 26 of the inlet housing 18 and cooperates with an inlet valve member 34 carried in an annular channel 35 formed in the inlet housing 18, the inlet valve member 34 having one or more apertures 36 passing therethrough and disposed outboard of the annular valve seat 33.

In this manner, the valve member 34 is adapted to move to the right from the position illustrated in FIGURE 2, to permit fluid interconnected to the bore 29 to be drawn through the bore 29 into the chamber 24 of the fluid pump 11 during an intake stroke thereof in a manner hereinafter described, and the valve member 34 is adapted to move back to the left, as illustrated in FIGURE 2, to seal again-st the valve seat 33 to prevent fluid from returning from the chamber 24 to the bore 29 during an exhaust stroke of the fluid pump 11 in a manner hereinafter described.

The outlet housing 19 has a bore 37 passing therethrough to interconnect the chamber 24 of the fluid pump 11 with a cavity 38 interrupting the other side of the outlet housing 19.

An annular valve seat 39 interconnects the bore 37 .with the cavity 38 and cooperates with an outlet valve member 40 disposed in an annular channel 41 formed in the outlet housing 19, the valve member 40 having one or more apertures 42 passing therethrough and being disposed outboard of the annular valve seat 39.

In this manner, the outlet valve member 40 can be moved to the left to seal against the valve seat 39 during an intake stroke of of the pump assembly 11 and will be moved to the right away from the valve seat 39 to permit fluid to flow from the chamber 24 out through the apertures 32 during an exhaust stroke of the pump assembly the outlet housing 19.

A porous member 46, such as foamed plastic or the like, is adapted torbe disposed around the hub member 45 and be held thereon by a retaining member 47 and the staking flange 43, whereby the fluid passing from the chamber 24 through the outlet housing 19 is expelled to the atmosphere through the porous member 46.

The hub 45 has a threaded bore 48 passing therethrough and threadedly receives a threaded stem 49 interconnected to the armature 16 by a resilient grommet 50, whereby the armature 16 can move through a substantially arcuate path while causing the stem 49 to move through a substantially straight path.

In this manner, it can be seen that the stem 49 interconnects the arm-ature 16 to the outlet housing 19, whereby oscillating movement of the armature 16 in the above manner causes the outlet housing 19 to oscillate relative to the inlet housing 18 for a purpose hereinafter described.

As illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 3, the flexible diaphragm 20 has the outer periphery 22 thereof reversely 'turned at 51 to define an annular and inwardly facing channel 52 for a purpose hereinafter described.

The inner periphery 21 of the flexible diaphragm 20 tapers inwardly and is adapted to be received in an annular channel 53 of the outlet housing 19 defined between the body portion thereof and an outwardly directed annular flange 54 in a manner hereinafter described.

The flexible diaphragm 20 has reduced cross-sectional portions 55 and 56 respectively disposed inboard of the peripheries 22 and 21 thereof for a purpose hereinafter described to localize bending and stretching of the diaphragm 20 during use thereof to minimize wear of the diaphragm.

One method of this invention for assembling the pump assembly 11 of this invention will now be described.

Either before or after the hub 45 and porous member 46 have been secured to the outlet housing 19 in the above manner, the inner periphery 21 of the flexible diaphragm 20 is disposed in the annular channel 53 of the outlet housing 19, while the annular flange 54 thereof is disposed in the dotted fabricated position illustrated in FIGURE 2 to readily permit the inner periphery 21 of the flexible diaphragm .20 to be stretched over the annular flange 54 and be disposed in the channel 53.

There-after, the annular flange 54 of the outlet housing 19 is staked inwardly toward the body portion thereof as illustrated in FIGURE 2 to secure the inner periphery 21 of the diaphragm 22 to the outlet housing 19.

Subsequently, the inlet housing 18 is brought adjacent the outlet housing 19 and the outer periphery 22 of the flexible diaphragm 20 is snap fitted over the peripheral flange 23 of the inlet housing 18 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 2, whereby the flexible diaphragm 20 is placed under tension between the inlet housing 18 and the outlet housing 19 and secures the inlet housing 18 to the outlet housing 19, the diaphragm 20 cooperating with the the housings 18 and 19 to define a chamber therebetween.

The completed pump assembly 11 is then adapted to be secured to the frame means 12 in the manner previously described, as well as to the armature 16 by the stem 49.

Therefore, it can be seen that the pump assembly 11 of this invention is made from a relatively few basic parts in the relatively simple manner to produce a fluid pump which operates in the manner now to be described.

When the armature 16 is the neutral position illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2 and the motor means 14 pulls the armature 1-6 to the left in substantial alignment with the core .13, the outlet housing 19 is moved [from the position illustnated in FIGURE 2 to the left to decrease the capacity of the chamber :24 of the pump .11 whereby the fluid in the chamber 24 is placed under compression and moves the inlet valve member '34 into sealing relation with the annular valve seat 33.

Simultaneously, the fluid being compressed in the chamber 24 .by the lefitward movement of the outlet housing 19 torces open the outlet valve member 40 whereby the fluid in the chamber 24 can be expelled out thmough the porous material 46.

When the armature 16 is moved back to the right to the position iillustnated in FIGURES 1 and 2 by the leaf spring 115, the outlet housing 19 moves back to the right to increase the capacity of the chamber 24 whereby a vacuum condition exists in the chamber '24 and causes the outlet valve member 40 to seal against the annular valve seat 3 9.

This vacuum condition created in the chamber 24 causes the inlet valve member 34 to move to the left and open the valve seat 33 whereby the fluid interconnected to the bore 29 is adapted to be drawn into the chamber 24 by the vacuum condition existing therein.

Thus, it can be seen that as the outlet housing 119 is oscillated to the right and to the left, the fluid pump -11 is adapted to pump fluid from a device interconnected to ghe btgre 29 of the pump 11 out through the porous memer 3 During the oscillation of the outlet housing 1 9 relative to the inlet housing 18 in the above manner, the flexible diaphragm 20 stretches and bends to accommodate such movement, such bending and stretching of the flexible diaphragm 20 being localized by the reduced portions 55 and 56 thereof to oeduce the amount of friction between g the housing 18 and 19 and the diaphragm 20 to thereby extend the life of the pump 11.

When the fluid pump 11 is interconnected to a vacuum operated device and the vacuum operated device only requires the removal of a small amount of therefrom by the pump assembly 11, the fluid pump 11 has the diaphragm :20 progressively move toward a no-flow position as illustrated in FIGURE 4 as the vacuum condition in the vacuum operated device progressively increases whereby the diaphragm 20 is progressively moved inwardly against the conical wall 27 of the inlet housing 18 to the no-flow position thereof.

:In this manner, the outlet housing 19 and the armature .16 are moved toward substantial alignment with the core 13 so tltat the amplitude of oscillation of the armature 1'8 and outlet housing 19 is substantially reduced during this nc-flow condition of the fluid pump .11 whereby the capacity of the pump 11 is reduced during the no-flow condition as there is no more air to be removed by the pump.

However, when another vacuum operated device or the like is subsequently interconnected to the pump 11, the diaphragm 120 moves back to the position illustrated in FIGURE 2 to provide maximum pumping action of the fluid pump 11 in the above manner.

Therefore, it can be seen that the fluid pump 11 of this invention is relatively simple to manufacture because of the reduced number of parts thereof and because the parts thereof are simplified and can be readily assembled to gether in a relatively simple manner without requiring expensive assembling machinery or the like.

Another fluid pump of this invention is generally indicated by the reference numeral 57 in FIGURE 5 and parts thereof similar to the fluid pump 11 are indicated by like reference numerals followed by the reierence letter a.

The fluid pump 57 of this invent-ion operates in substantially the same manner as the fluid pump 11 and comprises an inlet housing 18a, an outlet housing 19a and a flexible diaphragm 20a as illustrated in FIGURES 5 and 6.

The outlet housing 19a is substantially identical to the housing 19 previously described and the inlet housing 18a is substantially identical to the inlet housing 18 previously described except that the outwardly directed peripheral flange I236! thereof has a substantially rectangular crosssectional configuration.

The diaphragm 20a of the fluid pump 57 is substantially identical to the flexible diaphragm 20 previously described except that the outer periphery 22a thereof has a substantially rectangular cross-sectional configuration provided with an annular, inwardly directed channel 52a having a substantially rectangular cross-sectional configuration to cooperate with the peripheral flange 23a of the inlet housing 18a in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5.

Thus, it can be seen that the flexible diaphragm 20a is adapted to have its inner periphery 21a sta ked to the outlet housing 19a in the manner previously described and have its outer periphery 22a snap fitted over the peripheral flange 23a of the inlet housing 18a in the manner previously described to place the diaphragm 20a under tension between the housings 18a and 19a.

However, as illustrated in FIGURE 5, the body portion of the flexible diaphragm 20a is spaced trom an end wall 58 of the inlet housing 18a by the outer periphery 22a thereof to prevent the body portion of the flexible diaphragm 20a from contacting the housing 18a during the exhaust stroke whereby Wear on the diaphragm 20a is prevented.

Further, during the oscillation of the outlet housing 19a relative to the mlet housing 118a, the outer periphery 22a of the diaphragm 20a cooperates with the peripheral flange 23a of the inlet housing 18a to prevent a shoe shine effect or oscillating movement of the diaphragm 20a against the inlet housing 18a because the rectangular cross-sectional configuration of the peripheral flange 23a 6 of the inlet housing 18a prevents the peripheral flange 22a of the diaphragm 20a from oscillating or moving during operation of the pump :57 in the above manner.

Therefore, it can be seen that another improved fluid pump is provided by this invention having features similar to the fluid pump 11 previously described as well as additional novel features as set forth above.

While the form of the invention now preferred has been disclosed as required by the statutes, other forms may be used, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. A fluid pump comprising an inlet housing, an outlet housing, one of said housings having an outwardly directed peripheral flange, and a flexible diaphragm having an outer periphery and an inner periphery, said diaphragm having its outer periphery snap fitted over said peripheral flange of said one housing and having its inner periphery staked to the other housing to cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween, said diaphragm being under tension between said housings in the at rest position of said pump and having a portion thereof reduced in cross-sectional thickness inboard of its securement to one of said housings to localize bending and stretching of said diaphragm.

2. A fluid pump comprising an inlet housing, an outlet housing, and a flexible diaphragm having an outer periphery and an inner periphery, said diaphragm having its outer periphery secured to one of said housings and its inner periphery secured to the other housing to cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween, said diaphragm being under tension between said housings in the at rest position of said pump.

3. A fluid pump comprising an inlet housing, an outlet housing, and a flexible diaphragm having an outer periphery and an inner periphery, said diaphragm having its outer periphery snap fitted over one of said housings and its inner periphery secured to the other housing to cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween, said diaphragm being under tension between said housings in the at rest position of said pump.

4. A fluid pump as set forth in claim 3 wherein said one housing having a peripheral flange over which said outer periphery of said diaphragm is snap fitted and wherein said peripheral flange has a substantially triangular cross-sectional configuration.

5. A fluid pump as set forth in claim 3 wherein said one housing having a peripheral flange over which said outer periphery of said diaphragm is snap fitted and wherein said peripheral flange has a substantially rectangular cross-sectional configuration.

6. A fluid pump as set forth in claim 5 wherein said outer periphery of said diaphragm has a substantially rectangular cross-sectional configuration.

7. A fluid pump as set forth in claim 6 wherein said diaphragm has the body portion thereof disposed spaced from said one housing at said peripheral flange.

8. A fluid pump comprising an inlet housing, an outlet housing, and a flexible diaphragm having an outer periphery and an inner periphery, said diaphragm having its outer periphery snap fitted over one of said housings and its inner periphery staked to the other housing to cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween, said other housing having a channel therein, said inner periphery of said diaphragm increasing in thickness toward said other housing and being staked in said channel.

9. A fluid pump as set forth in claim 8 wherein said channnel of said other housing is defined in part by an outwardly directed flange and said inner periphery of said diaphragm is disposed in said channel with said flange staking said inner periphery in said channel.

10. A method for making a fluid pump or the like from an inlet housing, an outlet housing and a flexible diaphragm, comprising the steps of providing said diaphragm with a portion thereof reduced in cross-sectional thickness inboard of one of its inner and outer peripheries, staking said inner periphery of said diaphragm in an annular channel of one of said housings, and snap fitting said outer periphery of said diaphragm over an outwardly directed peripheral flange of the other housing diaphragm, comprising the steps of securing the inner periphery of said diaphragm to one of said housings, and securing the outer periphery of said diaphragm to the other housing to place said diaphragm under tension between .said housings when said pump is at rest and have said diaphragm cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween.

12. A method for making a fluid pump or the like from an inlet housing, an outlet housing and a flexible diaphragm, comprising the steps of securing the inner periphery of said diaphragm to one of said housings, and snap fitting the outer periphery of said diaphragm over the other housing to place said diaphragm under tension between said housing when said pump is at rest and have said diaphragm cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween.

13. A method for making a fluid pump or the like from an inlet housing, an outlet housing and a flexible diaphragm, comprising the steps of securing the inner periphery of said diaphragm to one of said housings, and snap fitting the outer periphery of said diaphragm over an outwardly directed flange of the other housing to place said diaphragm under tension between said housings when said pump is at rest and have said diaphragm cooperate with said housings to define a chamber therebetween.

14. A method as set forth in claim 13 wherein said outer periphery of said diaphragm is so snap fitted over said peripheral flange that the body portion of said diaphragm is spaced from said other housing at said pe ripheral flange.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 104,289 6/70 Edwards 103-451 1,767,934 6/30 Longenecker 103152 X 2,501,294 3/50 Si-gvard. 2,818,026 12/57 Wright 103-450 2,934,024 4/60 Hallstrom 103152 LAURENCE V. EFNER, Primary Examiner..

WARREN E. COLEMAN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US104289 *Jun 14, 1870 Improvement in pumps
US1767934 *Apr 23, 1928Jun 24, 1930Chain Belt CoDiaphragm pump
US2501294 *Dec 26, 1945Mar 21, 1950Hansen Sigvard SvendPulsator for milking machines
US2818026 *Nov 29, 1954Dec 31, 1957Tokheim CorpPump connector mounting
US2934024 *May 9, 1958Apr 26, 1960Hallstrom Jr Olof ADiaphragm pump and milk transfer apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3335668 *Feb 1, 1966Aug 15, 1967Molon Motor & Coil CorpPump
US3339094 *Aug 26, 1964Aug 29, 1967Robertshaw Controls CoElectromagnetic pump
US3711226 *Feb 25, 1971Jan 16, 1973Robertshaw Controls CoPneumatic pump construction and method for making the same or the like
US3830259 *Feb 9, 1972Aug 20, 1974J MercierPressure vessel
US4066101 *Jun 30, 1975Jan 3, 1978Fries Jan Richard DeMultiple way valve
US4232851 *Feb 6, 1979Nov 11, 1980Textron Inc.Fluid control valve and liner therefor
US4968301 *Feb 2, 1989Nov 6, 1990Imed CorporationDisposable infusion device
US5145336 *Mar 4, 1991Sep 8, 1992Knf Neuberger GmbhDiaphragm pump with reinforced diaphragm
US5368570 *Nov 12, 1991Nov 29, 1994Imed CorporationApparatus for infusing medical solutions
US5421242 *Oct 29, 1993Jun 6, 1995Huba Control AgMembrane arrangement for a pressure switch or for a pressure-responsive transmitter and process and apparatus for assembling the arrangement
US5540568 *Sep 27, 1994Jul 30, 1996National Instrument Co., Inc.Disposable rolling diaphragm filling unit
US6067893 *Mar 10, 1998May 30, 2000Westinghouse Air Brake CompanyRibbed diaphragm
Classifications
U.S. Classification92/99, 417/480, 92/98.00R
International ClassificationF04B39/10, F04B45/00, F04B45/047, F04B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B45/047, F04B43/0054, F04B39/1073
European ClassificationF04B43/00D8, F04B45/047, F04B39/10R