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Publication numberUS3212631 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1965
Filing dateNov 7, 1963
Priority dateNov 7, 1963
Publication numberUS 3212631 A, US 3212631A, US-A-3212631, US3212631 A, US3212631A
InventorsThompson Glenn L
Original AssigneeThompson Glenn L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt
US 3212631 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 19, 1965 THOMPSON 3,212,631

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING A MOVING BELT Filed Nov. 7, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR G/enn 1.. 7770030800 BY Z47, M h w Afforngys Oct. 19, 1965 L. THOMPSON 3,212,631

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING A MOVING BELT Filed Nov. 7, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

F 5 653 G/ennLTko/rzpsom fl E 69 BY Z M? United States Patent 3,212,631 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING A MOVING BELT Glenn L. Thompson, 1832 Woodland Ave. SW., Birmingham, Ala. Filed Nov. 7, 1963, Ser. No. 322,196 7 Claims. (CL 198-230) This invention relates to apparatus for cleaning a moving belt and more particularly to such apparatus which cleans the belt continuously, thereby eliminating any buildup of materials thereon.

An object of my invention is to provide apparatus for cleaning a moving belt of the character designated in which hammer-like elements are mounted for continuous rotation in cleaning position contiguous the belt whereby materials are removed therefrom without damage to the belt.

Another object of my invention is to provide apparatus for cleaning a moving belt which shall include improved means for maintaining the cleaning elements in a predetermined position relative to the belt, thereby compensating for irregular thicknesses of the belt.

Anothe object of my invention is to provide apparatus for cleaning a moving belt in which the materials are removed at a single location, thereby permitting the materials to be recovered with a minimum of reclaiming apparatus.

A still further object of my invention is to provide apparatus for cleaning a moving belt of the character designated which shall be simple of construction, economical of manufacture and one which is adapted for use with various type endless conveyors which are adapted to convey various type materials.

Briefly, my improved apparatus for cleaning a moving belt comprises a rotary member adjacent and extending transversely of the moving belt. Cleaning elements are carried by the rotary member and gauge members are operatively connected to the rotary member in position to engage the belt and thereby retain the cleaning elements in cleaning position contiguous the belt as rotary motion is imparted to the rotary member.

Apparatus embodying features of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, partly broken away, showing a fragment of a conveyor with my improved cleaning apparatus associated therewith;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view, partly broken away, taken generally along the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken generally along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmental View taken generally along the line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a fragmental, perspective view showing the means for securing the brush elements in place; and,

FIG. 7 is an enlarged view taken generally along the line 77 of FIG. 3.

Referring now to the drawings for a better understanding of my invention, I show a conveyor frame 10 which supports a head pulley 11 in suitable bearings 12. Passing around the head pulley 11 is an endless conveyor belt 13. The return flight of the belt 13 is supported by suitable idler rolls 15. The endless belt 13 passes around a tail pulley, not shown, and the upper flight thereof is supported by idler rolls in a manner well understood in the art.

Secured to opposite sides of the frame 10 are depending brackets 14 which support bearing members 16, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Mounted for rotation in the bearing members 16 is a transverse shaft 17. Mounted for rotation on the shaft 17 by suitable bearing brackets 18 is a movable frame 19 which comprises channel like side members 21 having the flanges thereof outurned, as shown in FIG. 2. The ends of the channel members 21 are connected to each other by transverse channel members 22 having inturned flanges. The bearing brackets 18 are secured to the side members 21 by suitable means, such as bolts 20.

Secured to the side channels 21 by suitable means are inturned support brackets 23 which support bearing members 24. Bolts 26 secure the bearing members 24 to the brackets 23, as shown. Mounted for rotation in the bearing members 24 is a transverse shaft 27. One end of the shaft 27 projects outwardly of the adjacent support bracket 14, as shown in FIG. 2, and mounted on and adapted for rotation with the shaft 27 is a pulley 28 which is driven by an endless belt 29 which is operatively connected to a motor indicated generally at 31. As shown in FIG. 1, the motor 31 is mounted at the opposite side of the pivot shaft 17 from the shaft 27 whereby the shaft 27 is urged toward the conveyor belt 13.

Secured to the shaft 27 inwardly of the bearing members 24 are disc-like members 32. Secured to and extending between the disc-like members 32 are a plurality of angularly spaced rods 33 which extend in spaced, parallel relation to the shaft 27, as shown in FIG. 3. The rods 33 are supported intermediate their ends by relatively thin disc members 34, as shown in FIG. 2.

A plurality of outwardly projecting arms 36 are mounted for rotation on each of the elongated rods 33, whereby upon rotation of the shaft 27 the arms 36 are held in radial positions relative to the shaft 27 by centrifugal force. Secured to the outer end of each of the arms 36 by suitable retaining bolts 37 is a hammer-like member 38 which is formed of a resilient rubber-like material. Preferably, the Shore durometer hardness of the rubber-like material ranges from approximately 65 to 80. The hammer-like members 38 are provided with recesses 39 for receiving the outer ends of the arms 36 and elongated openings 41 are provided in the hammer-like members for receiving the bolts 37, as shown in FIG. 7. To prevent distortion of the resilient members 38 upon tightening the bolts 37, I mount metal tube-like members 42 within the elongated openings 41. Preferably, the tube-like members 42 are bonded within the resilient hammer-like members 38 at the time they are formed. By providing the elongated openings 41, the position of each resilient hammer-like member 38 may be adjusted relative to the end of its associated arm 36.

Secured to and extending between the disc-like members 32 between the rods 33 are elongated rods 43, as shown in FIG. 3. The rods 43 are spaced from and extend generally parallel to the shaft 27 and are preferably spaced equidistant between adjacent rods 33. Secured to the rods 43 inwardly of the disc members 32 are radially extending arms 44 of support members 46. As shown in FIG. 3, the support members 46 are secured to the shaft 27 by suitable set screws 47. The central portion of the rods 43 are also supported by a support member 46, as shown in FIG. 2.

The outer end of each radially extending arm 44 is cut away as at 48 for receiving one leg of an L-shaped bracket 49, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6. The inner edge of the L-shaped bracket 49 is undercut as at 51 and an oppositely disposed portion of the arm 44 is cut away as at 52 to provide a generally dove-tail groove, as shown in FIG. 3, for receiving an elongated brush holder 53 which is generally channel-shaped for receiving bristles 54, as shown in FIG. 6. After the bristles 54 are positioned within the channel members 53, the legs of the channel member are bent inwardly toward each other to thereby clamp the bristles in place. Also, after securing the bristles 54 in place, the members 53 are of a shape corresponding to the dove-tail grooves defined by the cutaway portions 51 and 52 whereby they may be secured firmly in place by suitable means, such as bolts 56 which pass through the arms 44 and the L-shaped brackets 49 carried thereby. The bristles 54 are formed of a suitable material, such as nylon or the like.

Mounted adjacent the forward ends of the channel members 21, as shown in FIG. 2, are upstanding guide brackets 57 having vertical guide members 58 which are generally T-shaped, as viewed in cross section. The upper ends of the guide members 58 are connected to each other by a transverse member 59. Mounted for vertical movement along the guide members 58 is a bearing block 61 having recesses 62 in opposite sides thereof in position to receive the vertical guides 58, as shown in FIG. 5, whereby the bearing block 61 is adapted for vertical movement along the guide members 58. Projecting inwardly of each of the bearing blocks 61 is a stub shaft 63 which supports a gauge roller 64 that is in position to engage the outer surface of the belt 13, as shown in FIG. 2. Each bearing block 61 is held in selected positions along the guide members 58 by an elongated threaded member 66 which passes through a suitable opening 67 in the upper flange of the channel member 21, as shown in FIG. 4. Lock nuts 68 are provided at opposite sides of the flange of the channel member 21 to secure the threaded member 66 and the bearing block 61 in selected fixed positions. It will thus be seen that the position of the cleaning elements 38 and 54 relative to the belt 13 may be varied by moving the bearing block. 61 and the gauge roller 64 carried thereby to selected positions along the guide members 58 and then locking the same in place.

To maintain the gauge roller 64 in a clean condition at all times, I mount a scraper blade 69 on the bearing block 61, in position to engage the periphery of the roller 64.

To limit pivotal movement of the frame 19 about the shaft 17, I mount depending brackets 71 on the frame 10, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. carried by the lower ends of the depending brackets 71 in position to extend beneath the fname 19. Vertically extending threaded stop members 73 engage suitable threaded openings in the inturned members 72 whereby the vertical position of the threaded members 73 relative to the frame 19 may be varied to thereby vary the amount that the frame 19 can be pivoted. By providing the stop or limit members 73, safety means is provided to prevent the cleaning elements 38 from damaging the belt 13 in the event the gauge rollers 64 should become ineffective to hold the cleaning elements at a predetermined position relative to the belt.

From the foregoing description, the operation of my improved apparatus for cleaning a moving belt will be readily understood. With the frame 19 mounted for pivotal movement about the shaft 17, the motor 31 serves as a counterweight to urge the rotatable unit carried by the shaft 27 toward the conveyor belt 13. The bearing block 61 is adjusted relative to the vertical guide members 58 whereby the gauged roller 64 engages the belt 13 and holds the cleaning elements 38 contiguous the belt whereby relative rotation of the cleaning elements 38 and the belt 13 continuously removes any materials clinging to the belt. As shown in FIG. 1, the cleaning elements 38 rotate in the opposite direction from the direction of movement of the belt 13. That is, the head pulley 11 rotates in the direction of the arrow 74 while the cleaning elements rotate in the direction of the arrow 76. Preferably, the peripheral speed of the cleaning elements 38 and 54 is from approximately six to ten times the linear speed of the belt 13. In actual practice, I have found that where the conveyor belt is driven at a linear speed of approximately 300 feet per minute, the peripheral speed of the cleaning elements should be from approximately 1800 to 3000 feet per minute. Preferably, the gauge Inturned members 72 are roller 64 is adjusted whereby the resilient cleaning elements 38 are positioned from approximately A of an inch to A; of an inch from the adjacent surface of the belt 13. The bristles 54 are preferably slightly longer than the resilient cleaning elements 58 whereby the bristles engage the belt 13 and continuously remove any material left on the belt by the hammer-like members 38. That is, the bristles 54 follow the resilient hammer-like members 38 to thereby remove the materials which have been dislodged by the members 38, whereby the belt is maintained in a clean condition at all times. The scraper elements 69' continuously engage the gauge roller 64 whereby the gauge roller 64 has a constant diameter to thereby position the cleaning elements 38 and 54 at a predetermined accurate position relative to the belt 13.

While I have shown the frame 19 as being counterbalanced by the motor 31, it will be apparent that other counterbalance means may be employed, such as weights, springs and the like.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have devised an improved apparatus for continuously cleaning a moving belt. By providing resilient hammer-like members which are held in a predetermined position relative to the belt at all times by a gauge roller, the belt is thoroughly cleaned by the action of the hammer-like members without any damage to the belt. Also, by providing brush elements which continuously follow the hammer-like cleaning elements, any residual materials dislodged by the hammer-like elements which remains on the conveyor belt is removed immediately. By providing effective means for removing all of the materials clinging to the belt at one location, the materials may be reclaimed with a n1inimum of effort by catching the materials removed in a suitable conveyor discharge chute, or the like, whereby they may be transferred to any desired location. Accordingly, not only would the belt be continuously cleaned by my improved apparatus, but there would be no waste of materials removed. Furthermore, by providing centrifugally actuated arms which carry the hammer-like members, the cleaning elements are held in effective cleaning relation to the belt at all times and at the same time the arms 36 are not rigidly carried by the rotatable shaft, thereby assuring smooth and trouble-free operation of the apparatus at all times.

While I have shown my invention in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited, but is susceptible of various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof, and I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereupon as are specifically set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt comprising:

(a) a frame pivotally supported intermediate its ends,

(b) a rotary member mounted adjacent one end of said frame and extending transversely of said belt,

(c) radially extending arms pivotally connected at their inner ends to said rotary member and having resilient hammer-like cleaning elements at the outer ends thereof disposed to move to cleaning position contiguous said belt,

(d) a motor mounted on said frame at the opposite side of said pivot point from said rotary member urging said frame about its pivot point. to move said cleaning elements toward said belt,

(e) a gauge roller mounted on said frame adjacent said rotary member in position to engage said belt to retain said cleaning elements in cleaning position contiguous said belt, and

(f) means oper-atively connecting said motor to said rotary member to impart rotary motion to said rotary member.

2. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt as defined in claim 1 in which the linear speed of said belt is from approximately six to ten times the peripheral speed of said cleaning elements.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2 in which the linear speed of said belt is approximately 300 feet per minute.

4. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt as defined in claim 1 in which the resilient hammer members are formed of rubber-like material.

5. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt as defined in claim 4 in which the Shore durometer hardness of said rubber-like material ranges from approximately 65 to 80.

6. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt as defined in claim 1 in which the radially extending arms are spaced angularly from each other and radially extending brushes are carried by said rotary member between the angularly spaced arms.

7. Apparatus for cleaning a moving belt comprising:

(a) a shaft extending transversely of said belt and mounted for rotation in spaced relation thereto,

(b angularly spaced bars extending in parallel spaced relation to said shaft and operatively connected thereto for rotation therewith,

(c) hammer-like cleaning elements pivotally connected to said bars and disposed to extend outwardly there from to cleaning position contiguous said belt,

(d) at least one rotary gauge member operatively connected to said shaft in position to engage said belt and retain said cleaning elements in cleaning position contiguous said belt,

(e) means to impart rotary motion to said shaft, and

(f) brush elements extending in parallel spaced relation tosaid shaft between said cleaning elements in position to engage said belt, said brush elements being operatively connected to said shaft for rotation therewith.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,165,404 12/15 Harrington 198-230 X 1,543,411 6/25 Wittig 198230 X 2,652,242 9/53 Sapp 198-230 X SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, Primary Examiner.

WILLIAM B. LA BORDE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1165404 *Jan 26, 1914Dec 28, 1915Robert J HarringtonDevice for cleaning driving-belts.
US1543411 *Feb 16, 1925Jun 23, 1925Wittig Alvin CPicking table for pea viners and cleaners and the like
US2652242 *Mar 6, 1948Sep 15, 1953American Metal Co LtdDevice for cleaning grate bars of sintering machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3578151 *Nov 29, 1968May 11, 1971Leading PlywoodSheet conveyor system
US3664219 *Jun 23, 1970May 23, 1972Calsilox SaApparatus for cutting a block of plastic material
US4729468 *Apr 23, 1986Mar 8, 1988Korber AgApparatus for monitoring the condition of filamentary belts in cigarette making machines and the like
US5161666 *Aug 26, 1991Nov 10, 1992Hugh D. EllerConveyor belt cleaner
US5400897 *Mar 16, 1994Mar 28, 1995Doyle Equipment Manufacturing CompanyFertilizer conveyor
US5497872 *Jul 1, 1994Mar 12, 1996Pari IndustriesMethod and apparatus for cleaning conveyor belts
US5657853 *Jan 13, 1995Aug 19, 1997Pari Industries, Inc.Belt conveyors having cleaning rollers
US7240786 *Oct 7, 2004Jul 10, 2007Hratch BoyadjianFeed apparatus and binding device
US8240460Jun 8, 2010Aug 14, 2012Michael James BleauApparatus for cleaning a conveyor belt
US20050244253 *Oct 7, 2004Nov 3, 2005Hratch BoyadjianFeed apparatus and binding device
US20160009501 *Apr 7, 2015Jan 14, 2016Aikawa Iron Works Co., Ltd.Cleaning apparatus and cleaning method
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/496, 198/498
International ClassificationB65G45/18, B65G45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65G45/18
European ClassificationB65G45/18