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Publication numberUS3213270 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1965
Filing dateApr 16, 1962
Priority dateApr 16, 1962
Publication numberUS 3213270 A, US 3213270A, US-A-3213270, US3213270 A, US3213270A
InventorsArthur I Appleton, Carl H Lindell, Allan P Stephensen
Original AssigneeAppleton Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flood lamp fixture
US 3213270 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INVENTORS 4279'? 1. APPlEid/V am a Z/A/fiil 5 Sheets-Sheet l FLOOD LAMP FIXTURE A. l. APPLETON ETAL Oct. 19, 1965 Filed April 16, 1962 Oct 1965 A. APPLETON ETAL 3,213,270

FLOOD LAMP FIXTURE Filed April 16, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 -49 4/ Q5 19/ 22 if INVENTORS 4277/? 11 APPAKIUIV [4E1 [IA/DELL Oct. 19, 1965 A. l. APPLETON ETAL FLOOD LAMP FIXTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 16, 1962 A.wl'lmuuummu INVENTORS N M m m m 2 H m Ma k/f .w 4 [l 2 United States Patent Illinois Filed Apr. 16, 1962, Ser. No. 187,701 7 Claims. (Cl. 240-3) The present invention relates generally to flood lamp fixtures and, more particularly, to an improved fixture suitable for use in a wide range of indoor and outdoor illuminating applications.

It is a general aim of the invention to provide a new and improved lighting fixture having a wider range of applications than heretofore possible with conventional flood lamp fixtures, and characterized by its ability to distribute an effective and sharply defined pattern of light.

In another of its aspects, it is an object of the invention to provide a sealed and weatherproof lighting fixture having an improved indexing mechanism which may be readily released when the need for servicing or relamping arises, yet wherein the lighting fixture may be accurately and quickly returned to its prealined position upon completion of a servicing operation.

It is a more detailed object of the invention to provide an indexing mechanism 'which permits of relamping and servicing operations or the like and which may be released or reengaged by the simple expedient of loosening or tightening a single threaded element.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a compact, relatively inexpensive, high intensity lighting fixture which is light in weight and which permits of ease in installation and handling.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation, partly in section, of an exemplary flood lamp fixture embodying the features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and illustrating the interior of the lamp housing;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of FIG. 2 illustrating one organization of components for varying the vertical beam spread emanating from the fixture;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 illustrating a slightly modified arrangement for varying the vertical beam spread;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGS. 3 and 4 and illustrating yet another arrangement for selectively varying the beam spread emanating from the fixture;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 6-6 of FIG. 1 illustrating the details of the swivel-type indexing connection between the lamp housing and a cross arm mounting support;

FIG. 7 is. a side view, partly in section, of the selectively rotatable indexing stop collar used with the swiveltype connection shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view, partly in section and similar to FIG. 6, illustrating a slightly different swiveltype indexing connection, here shown in conjunction with a pole slip-fitter mounting support;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the indexing and locking bar used with the swivel-type connection shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view, on a somewhat reduced scale, of the lamp housing shown in FIG. 1 illustrating "ice the hinged latch assembly used to hold the lens panel assembly in place on the fixture;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along the line 11-11 of FIG. 2 and illustrating details of the lens panel assembly and its weatherproof seal;

FIG. 12 is an exploded perspective view of the removable fuse assembly used in connection with the mounting supports shown in FIGS. 6 and 8; and,

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 1313 of FIG. 6 with certain components removed for purposes of clarity, and illustrating the mounting details for the fuse assembly.

While the present invention is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, illustrative embodiments thereof have been shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. vIt should be understood, however, that it is not intended to limit the invention to the particular forms disclosed, but, on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

Referring more specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2, an exemplary flood lamp assembly, generally indicated at 20 is there illustrated. As the ensuing description proceeds, it will be appreciated that the novel features of the present invention will find use with a wide variety of flood lamp fixtures. and will be described in connection with a flood lamp fixture of the type utilizing an iodine cycle type lamp. A typical fixture of this type is described in detail in the copending application of Arthur I. Appleton, Serial No. 66,008, filed August 31, 1960, now abandoned.

The exemplary flood lamp assembly 20 includes a generally trough-shaped lamp housing 21 which houses an iodine cycle type lamp 22 having a filament extending the length of the tubular glass envelope. The opposite ends of the lamp housing 21 are closed by a pair of spaced end walls 24, 25, here shown as integral with the housing 21. Provision is also made for mounting the lamp housing 21 on a fixed support 26. To accomplish this, the housing 21 has formed thereon an integral, depending mounting flange 28 (FIG. 10) which is swivelly mounted on the support 26, thus permitting the housing 21 to be pivoted about a substantially horizontal axis and aimed in any desired vertical direction.

The fixed support 26 may be of the type shownin FIGS. 1, 2 and 6 suitable for mounting on a cross arm (not shown), Alternatively, the fixed support may be of the pole slipfitter type 26a shown in FIG. 8 suitable for being attached to the upper end of a generally vertical mounting pole (not shown). As is conventional with cross arm mounting supports and pole slipfitter supports similar to those described above, provision may be made for rotating the supports about a substantially vertical axis, thus permitting the lamp housing 21 to be aimed in any desired horizontal direction. The fixed supports 26 and 26a also serve to receive and house the electrical wiring facilities. As best shown by reference to FIGS. 1 and 6 conjointly, a power cord 29 is snugly received within a rubber bushing 30 positioned in an opening 31 formed in the cross arm support 26. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that with pole slipfitter type mounting supports 26a (FIG. 8), the electrical wiring facilities may extend upwardly through the pole (not shown) and into the base of the support.

Provision is made for directing a sharp and precisely controlled beam of high intensity illumination from the flood lamp assembly 20. To this end, a parabolic trough reflector 32 (FIG. 2) is securely mounted within the housing 21, for example, by a pair of threaded fasteners However, the invention is here illustrated 3 34. A pair of end reflectors 35, 36 are mounted in the housing 21 with each end reflector having a peripheral contour conforming the internal shape of the parabolic trough reflector 32. The end reflectors 35, 36 are respectively provided with openings 37 positioned to receive the opposite ends of the elongate iodine cycle type lamp 22. The lamp electrodes are received in a pair of spaced apart, oppositely disposed sockets 38, 39 which are respectively mounted on the housing end walls 24, 25 and which extend into the lamp housing 21 through openings 40 formed in the walls 24, 25. For the purpose of an understanding of the present invention, it will be sufl'icient to state that the sockets 38, 39 are axially alined and mounted in such a manner that the lamp filament is suspended substantially along the focal axis A, (FIG. 2) of the parabolic reflector 32. The foregoing arrangement insures that a sharply defined high intensity light beam is directed out of the housing 21.

As here shown, the sockets each include a planar mounting base 41 which permits the sockets to be rigidly secured to the respective end walls as, for example, by screws 42. To facilitate insertion of a lamp 22 into the sockets 38, 39 and its subsequent removal, the sockets (for example, the socket 38 shown in FIG. 3) include a tubular body portion 3811 having an annular radially projecting stop flange 38b. The body portion is received within a tubular sleeve 38c integral with the mounting base 41. A coil spring 44 is interposed between the stop flange 38b and the base 41 in surrounding relation to the body 38a. Thus, the spring 44 tends to urge the body portion 38a in an axial direction towards the interior of the lamp housing 21. Hence, to remove or insert a lamp 22, one or both of the body portions 38a, 39a (FIG. 2) are pressed axially out of the lamp housing until the lamp electrodes are registered therewith. When the body portions are released, the lamp is firmly seated in the sockets 38, 39.

In carrying out the present invention, provision is made for enclosing and sealing the exposed ends of the sockets 38, 39 while at the same time insuring adequate dissipation of heat from the vicinity of the sockets so as to maintain the ends of the'lamp envelope below the maximum permissible operating temperature. To accomplish the foregoing objective, end caps 45, 46 are respectively mounted on the exterior of the end walls 24, 25 by means of threaded fasteners 48 and positioned to totally enclose the exposed ends of the sockets. Sealing gaskets 49, interposed between the end caps and their associated end walls, provide an effective weatherproof seal when the threaded fasteners 48 are tightened. To facilitate the dissipation of heat from the socket area, the housing 21 and the end caps .45, 46 are formed of a material, for example, aluminum alloy, having a relatively high coeflicient of thermal conductivity and the ability siphon heat away from the sockets. Rapid dissipation of heat is promoted by forming heat dissipating or cooling fins 50 on the end caps. Additional cooling fins 51 may be formed on the exterior of the lamp housing to promote even more rapid removal of heat.

In the illustrative invention provision is made for selectively varying the beam spread emanating from any given reflective surface mounted in the flood lamp assembly so as to accommodate different requirements for particular illuminating applications. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, this is accomplished by shifting the focal axis A, of the parabolic reflector 32 relative to the axis A of the lamp supporting sockets 38,39. When, for example, the reflector focal axis A, and the socket axis A are coincident, the light beam emanating from the fixture is composed of substantially parallel rays. If the light source, i.e., the lamp filament is moved away from the focal axis A; and toward the base of the reflector 32 (i.e., decreasing the focal length), the rays of light emanating from the housing 21 will diverge, thus forming a broader vertical beam spread. On the other hand, when the light source is moved in the opposite direction, the light rays tend to converge, thus creating a narrower vertical beam spread.

In the exemplary form of the invention shown in FIG. 3, variable spacing of the reflector focal axis A, and the socket axis A, is achieved by interposing spacer elements 52 between the parabolic reflector 32 and the lamp housing 21. Such spacer elements are preferably washer-like in configuration and are retained in place by being mounted in surrounding relation to the threaded fasteners 34 used to retain the reflector 32 in the housing. Thus, by decreasing the thickness of the spacer 52, the base of the reflector 32 is moved away from the socket axis A shifting the reflector focal axis A; to the position A, and resulting in a light pattern composed of converging rays. If the spacer 52 is replaced with a thicker spacer, or if two or more such spacers 52 are employed, the base of the reflector is moved towards the socket axis A thus shifting the focal axis A, to the position A and resulting in a light pattern composed of diverging rays.

Turning next to FIG. 4, there is shown a slightly modified lighting fixture construction which permits of variation in the focal axis-socket axis spacing so as to selectively change the beam spread. In this form of the invention, a coil spring 53 is mounted in surrounding relation to the reflector mounting screws 34 in lieu of the spacer 52 shown in FIG. 3. This type of construction is particularly advantageously in that it permits the beam spread to be varied without the necessity of dismantling the reflector assembly. Thus, to broaden the beam spread, i.e., to shift the reflector focal axis A, to the position Af resulting in diverging light rays, it is simply necessary to back off the threaded fasteners 34. As the fasteners are backed off, the springs 53 tend to urge the base of the reflector 32 toward the socket axis A Alternatively, the beam spread may be made narrower (that is, composed of converging light rays) by the simple expedient of tightening the threaded fasteners 34. To insure that the reflector 32 remains fixed in any selected position, the underside of the heads of the threaded fasteners 34 and the abutting portions of the reflector 32 may each be provided with a plurality of mating radial serrations 54, thus preventing the fasteners 34 from loosening due to vibration or the like.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate that while the exemplary constructions shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 and described above provide for varying the focal axis-socket axis spacing by shifting the reflector 32 relative to the lamp housing 21, it would also be possible to shift the lamp supporting sockets 38, 39 relative to the housing while leaving the reflector assembly fixed. An exemplary construction of the latter type is here shown in FIG. 5. In this device, each of the sockets (for example, the socket 38 shown in FIG. 5) is rigidly mounted on a slide plate 55 by means of threaded fasteners 56 and projects into the lamp housing through an oversized or enlarged opening 40a formed in the end wall 24. The side plate 55 is releasably secured to the end wall 24 by a headed fastener 58 extending through an elongate slot 59 formed in the plate. Thus, when it is desired to shift the socket to vary the focal axis-socket axis spacing, it is merely necessary to remove the end caps 45, 46, loosen the fasteners 58, and move the slide plate 55 to the desired position. The fasteners 58 are then retightened and the end caps 45, 46 replaced.

In accordance with another of the important aspects of the present invention, there is provided a weatherproof swivel connection between the fixed mounting support and the lamp housing which not only permits passage of the enclosed electrical wiring facilities from the support to the housing, but which additionally permits the housing to be swiveled about a horizontal axis to any desired angular position and securely locked in place. In the preferred form of the invention, this objective is accomplished by forming both the fixed support 26 (or the support 26a) and the mounting bracket 28 on the lamp housing 21 with complementary frusto-conical bearing surfaces which are telescopically mounted and maintained in intimate face-to-face contact.

As shown best in FIG. 6, the depending mounting bracket 28 on the lamp housing 21 has formed therein a cavity 60 positioned to receive a laterally projecting hollow mounting boss 61 formed on the support 26. A portion of the cavity wall is tapered to form a frustoconical bearing surface 62 while the external surface of the mounting boss includes a complementary tapered portion defining a mating frusto-conical bearing surface 64. In assembling the lamp housing 21 on the cross arm support 26, the mounting bracket 28 is positioned on the mounting boss 61 with the bearing surfaces 62, 64 in mutual engagement. A locking bolt 65, extending through an aperture 66 in the bracket 28 and coaxial with the bearing surfaces 62, 64, is received within an axially alined threaded bore 68 formed in the support 26. When the locking bolt 65 is securely tightened, the two bearing surfaces are drawn into intimate face-to-face contact, thus frictionally locking the bracket to the support while simultaneously providing an eflicient metal-to-metal watertight seal. The electrical wiring facilities for supplying power to the lamp 22 are led upwardly into the lamp housing 21 through the support 26, the hollow boss 61, and a passageway 69 formed in the mounting bracket 28. In order to pivot or swivel the housing 21 to a different angular position, it is simply necessary to loosen the locking bolt 65 and move the housing to the desired position. The locking bolt is then retightened. Positioning accuracy is assured by providing suitable angular scale markings 70 (FIG. 1) on the outer surface of the support 26.

In keeping with the present invention, provision is made for releasing the lamp housing 21 from its prealined locked position so that the housing may be readily swiveled to a position more suitable for relamping, cleaning or other servicing operations, yet wherein the housing may be rapidly returned to the same prealined position upon completion of the servicing operation. In furtherance of this aim, the mounting boss 61 includes an external cylindrical surface 71 upon which is rotatably mounted an angular indexing ring 72 (FIG. 6). The indexing ring 72 is releasably locked in a desired angular position by means of a plurality of circumferentially spaced screws 74 (FIGS. 1 and 6). As best shown in FIG. 7, the indexing ring has formed thereon a radially projecting stop surface 75. The housing mounting bracket 28 has formed therein an arcuate groove 78 positioned to be slightly spaced from the peripheral surface of the ring 72 and which terminates in a radial stop surface 79 (FIGS. 6 and Referring to FIG. 1, it will be seen that when the lamp housing 21 is securely locked in a prealined position and the indexing ring 72 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction, the radial stop surfaces 75, 79 abut one another. The screws 74 are then tightened, securely locking the ring in place. It will be appreciated that provision of a plurality of circumferentially spaced screws 74 (three such screws being utilized in the exemplary construction) insures that at least two screws will always be accessible for locking purposes irrespective of the angular position of the ring. When it is desired to perform a servicing operation, it is merely necessary to loosen the locking bolt 65 (FIG. 6) and rotate the lamp housing in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 1 until the internal portions of the housing are in a more accessible position. The locking bolt 54 is then tightened to hold the housing in proper position for relamping and other maintenance operations. Upon completion of the servicing operation, the lamp housing is rotated in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 1 until the stops 75, 79 are again in abutment, at which point the flood lamp assembly is again in its prealined position.

Turning next to FIGS. 8 and 9, there is shown a slightly modified swivel and indexing connection which is somewhat similar in construction and operation to the arrangement described above and also embodying the present invention. In view of the similarity between the two exemplary swivel connections of the invention, like parts in both connections will be designated by identical reference numerals and those parts not common to the two connections will be designated by different reference numerals.

As shown in FIG. 8, the mounting bracket 28 is provided with a cavity 60 positioned to receive an outwardly projecting mounting boss 61 formed on the pole slipfitter support 26a. The cavity 60 and boss 61 are again provided with mating frusto-conical bearing surfaces 62, 64 respectively as heretofore described in connection With the arrangement shown in FIG. 6. However, in this form of the invention, the bearing surfaces are drawn into intimate contact by a single locking mechanism which also serves as an indexing mechanism for purposes of relamping and other servicing operations. As here shown, the locking and indexing mechanism includes a connecting bar 81 having a truncated conical surface 82 at one end and a polygonal flange 84 at its opposite end. As illustrated in FIG. 9, the polygonal shape of the flange 84 is square. However, as used herein, the term polygonal will connote any non-circular cross sectional shape suitable for indexing relatively rotatable members together. The truncated conical end 82 of the connecting bar 81 is received Within a complementary recess 85 formed in the support 26a and coaxial With the bearing surfaces 62, 64. The bar is retained in place by means of a locking bolt 86 which extends through an aperture 88 formed in the support 26a and is received within a threaded bore 89 formed in the end of the bar.

To facilitate relamping operations, the opposite end of the bar 81, i.e., that end formed with the polygonal or square flange 84, is slidably and non-rotatably received within a complementary square opening 90 formed in the bracket 28 and coaxial with the bearing surfaces 62, 64. An indexing bolt 91 is received within a threaded bore 92 formed in the square end of the bar 81 and securely locked in place by means of a drive pin 93. The indexing bolt projects laterally through the opening 90 in the mounting bracket and through an opening 94 formed in an annular end cap 95. A coil spring 96 is housed within the end cap with one end of the spring bottomed on the end cap and the opposite spring end bottomed on a washer 98, the latter being in abutment with the side of the mounting bracket 28. A wing nut 99 is utilized to maintain the square flange 84 on the bar 81 snugly received within the complementary opening 90, thus preventing relative rotation between the bar and the mounting bracket.

When it is desired to change the angular position of the housing 21 so that the flood lamp is aimed in a different vertical direction, the operator need only back off the locking bolt 86 slightly to permit relative rotation between the mating truncated conical surfaces 82, 85. Such slight backing off will also be sufircient to free the frictionally engaged bearing surfaces 62, 64, thus permitting the mounting bracket 28 to be swiveled to the desired angular position as indicated by the scale markings 70 (FIG. 1).

However, such slight backing off of the locking bolt 86 is not sufiicient to permit disengagement of the square flange 84 on the bar 81 and the opening 90 formed in the bracket 88. Consequently, the bar 81 and the bracket 28 will rotate as a unit during an alining or aiming operation. When the fixture is aimed in the desired angular direction, the locking bolt 86 is again retightened, securely locking the flood lamp assembly 20 in the desired alined position.

Let it now be assumed that the operator desires to perform a relamping or other servicing operation on a flood lamp assembly employing a swivel connection of the type shown in FIG. 8. In this instance, the wing-nut 99 is backed off a suflicient amount to permit the end .cap 95 and the bracket 28 to move in an axial direction (to the right as viewed in FIG. 8) so as to disengage the square flange 84 and the aperture 90. Initially, however, axial movement of the bracket 28 is resisted by the coil spring 96, thus preventing the lamp housing 21 from flopping and minimizing the danger of damage thereto. The bracket 28 and the lamp housing 21 may now be pivoted in either a clockwise or a counterclockwise direction to a position more suitable for the servicing operation simply by urging the bracket axially against the bias of the coil spring 96, thus disengaging the square flange 84 and the aperture 90. Since the flange 84 and the aperture 90 have complementary square configurations, the bracket 28 may be reengaged with the connect ing bar 81 in angular positions displaced from the prealined position by 90, 180 or 270 degrees.

When the servicing operation has been completed, the mounting bracket is returned to its prealined position and the flange is again positioned within the opening 90. Since the locking bolt 86 remains tightened during the entire servicing operation, rotational movement of the bar 81 is effectively inhibited due to frictional engagement of the truncated conical surfaces 82, 85. Consequently, when the square flange 84 and square opening 90 are again in registration with the flood lamp assembly oriented in the prealined angular position, the coil spring 96 will automatically urge the mounting bracket 28 axially to the left as viewed in FIG. 8, thus reengaging the flange and the opening. The entire connection may then be retightened simply by tightening the Wing-nut 99.

Of course, while the exemplary form of the invention shown in FIG. 8 has been illustrated as having an end cap 95 which houses a coil spring 96, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the spring and cap are not essential to the invention. Moreover, the indexing bolt 91 could be formed integral with the connecting bar if desired.

In order to retain a substantial portion of the heat developed by the iodine cycle type lamp 22 within the housing 21 while at the same time providing a weatherproof seal which prevents entry of dust and other deleterious contaminates, the interior of the housing 21 is enclosed and sealed from communication with the surrounding atmosphere. Access to the interior of the housing 21 for servicing operations is afforded by providing a removable lens panel assembly, generally indicated at 100 (FIGS. 1, 2 and In the illustrative form of the invention, the lens panel assembly 100 includes a rectangular frame 101 having an inwardly projecting rectangular tongue 102 positioned to be received within a groove 104 formed in the housing 21. A heat resistant glass lens panel 105, the marginal edges of which are surrounded by a gasket 106 of generally channel-shaped cross section, is received within the frame 101. Preferably, the gasket is both heat resistant and weatherproof and may be made, for example, of silicone rubber.

Referring more specifically to FIG. 11, it will be noted that the corners 108 of the glass lens panel 105 are,.in the present instance, cut away to accommodate reception of lens mounting clips 109. The cut away corners 108 serve an additional function in that they permit the gasket 106 to be wrapped entirely around the marginal edges of the glass panel 105 without danger of being cut by relatively sharp corners. The lamp mounting clips 109 maintain the frame 101, lens panel 105 and gasket 106 as a compact unitary assembly which may be readily removed for relamping or other servicing purposes. To accomplish this, the clips 109 are rigidly secured to the frame 101 by means of screws 110. Each clip is further provided with a tab portion 111 which projects through a slit formed in the gasket 106 and which overlies the lens panel 105. Thus, when the screws are tightened the panel 105 is firmly seated in the frame 101, crimping the 8 gasket 106 between the frame and the'panel to provide an effective weatherproof seal.

In keeping with the invention, provision is also made for securely mounting the lens panel assembly in place within the groove 104 in the housing 21 so as to insure a totally enclosed, weatherproof lamp chamber, yet wherein the panel assembly may be readily removed for servicing operations. In the exemplary form of the invention (FIG. 10), this is accomplished by hinging the panel assembly 100 to the housing 21 so that the former may be entirely removed from the lamp chamber opening irrespective of the angular orientation of flood lamp assembly 20, While at the same time being retained captive on the housing 21. In furtherance of this objective, two pairs of over-center toggle clamps 112a, 112b are rigidly mounted on the lamp housing 21. As here shown, the pair of toggle clamps 112a are secured to the underside of the housing while the pair of clamps 112b are secured to the housing top. Each of the toggle clamps includes an elongate spring member 114 having a generally U-shaped portion 115 adapted to overlie the adjacent front edge of the frame 101 on the lens panel assembly 100. As best illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, when the over-center toggle clamps are snapped to their operative closed positions, the U-shaped portions 115 of the spring members engage the opposite marginal edges of the frame 101, firmly seating the lens panel assembly 100 in the groove 104 and creating an effective weatherproof seal between the gasket 106 and the base of the housing groove 104.

To retain the lens panel assembly captive on the hous ing even when the lamp chamber is opened, the spring members 114 of one pair of toggle clamps are hinged directly to the frame 101. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 10 in the illustrative form of the invention, the spring members associated with the lower pair of clamps 112a are hinged to the frame 101 by a pair of hinge brackets 116 rigidly secured to the frame by screws 118. The hinge brackets include a generally C-shaped portion positioned to overlie and contain the bite of the U-shaped spring portions 115. It will be readily apparent that when the toggle clamps 112a, 112]; are released, i.e., snapped to the inoperative opened position (FIG. 10), the lens panel assembly will be suspended directly from the spring members 114 of the clamps 112a. The foregoing arrangement permits the lens panel assembly 100 to be opened for servicing operations, while at the same time being retained captive on the housing 21. Moreover, the assembly 100 may be pivoted entirely out of the servicemans way irrespective of the angular position of the housing 21. Of course, those skilled in the art will appreciate that in particular installations it may be desirable to hinge the upper toggle clamps 112b to the frame 101 rather than the lower clamps as described above.

In carrying out the present invention, provision is made for facilitating installation of the flood lamp assembly 20 and its associated fusing and wiring facilities, while at the same time providing ready access to such facilities in the event the assembly 20 is dismantled or should the need arise to replace a fuse. To accomplish this, there is provided a novel removable fuse bridge assembly, generally indicated at 120 (FIGS. 6 and 12), which is received within the fixed mounting support (for example, the cross arm support 26) and which is entirely enclosed therein so as not to be subjected to the weather. As here shown, the fuse bridge assembly 120 is mounted within a laterally extending, externally threaded projection 121 formed integral with the support 26. The projection is closed by means of a threaded cap 122 which is retained captive on the support 26 by a chain 124 having its 0pposite ends respectively secured to the support and the cap. Thus, access to the wiring facilities and the fuse cap 122.

holder 128 in assembled condition, a spring-like retaining clip 130 having a keyway slot 131 formed centrally therein is forced over that portion of the fuse holder and locking tongue projecting through the bridge 125. The fuse holder 128 receives a fuse 132 which is secured in place within the holder by a threaded cap 134.

To provide for securely mounting the fuse bridge assembly 120 within the fixed support 26 while at the same time facilitating ready removal thereof for installation, dismantling and servicing operations, the support includes a pair of integral internal bosses 135, 136 which are spaced apart on opposite sides of the support projection 121 (FIG. 13). A pivot pin 138 is rigidly secured on the boss 136 and positioned to project outwardly through a slot 139 formed in one end of the fuse bridge 135. The opposite boss 135 is provided with a suitable tapped opening (not shown) for reception of a headed threaded element, for example, a round head screw 140, which extends outwardly through a keyway slot formed in the bridge 125, the slot having a small end 141 and a large end 142. As best illustrated in FIG. 13, the arrangement is such that when the screw 140 is received within the small end 141 of the keyway slot and tightened down, the bridge 125, and consequently the fuse bridge assembly 120, is securely clamped between the head of the screw and the boss. When it is desired to gain access to the wiring facilities or the fuse bridge assembly for installation, dismantling or other servicing operations, it is merely necessary to back off slightly on the screw 140, thus freeing the bridge 125. In this condition, the fuse holder 128 may be grasped by the Serviceman and pivoted in a clockwise direction (as viewed in FIG. 13) about the pivot pin 138 until the head of the screw 140 is registered with the enlarged end 142 of the keyway slot formed in the fuse bridge. At this point the entire fuse bridge assembly 120 may be withdrawn axially from the support projection 121 as a unit.

It will be apparent that there has been disclosed an improved and novel flood lamp assembly characterized by its ability for distributing a light pattern having a selectable one of diverse beam spreads. Moreover, the flood lamp assembly may be readily released from a prealined or aimed position and swiveled to a position more suitable for relamping and other servicing operations. Additionally, since the assembly includes fixed indexing elements, the lamp housing may be returned to its prealined position after a servicing operation with speed and accuracy.

We claim as our invention:

1. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket rigidly secured to said housing, a first tapered bearing surface formed on said bracket, a pipe-like support, a second tapered bearing surface formed on said support with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis thereof, first locking means for drawing said first and second bearing surfaces into intimate face-to-face engagement so that said housing is frictionally locked to said support in a predetermined angular position relative thereto, adjustable indexing means defining a fixed stop, and second locking means for locking said adjustable indexing means to one of said housing and said support when said housing is in said predetermined angular position so that said fixed stop defines a limit position for automatically realining said housing in said predetermined angular position subsequent to release of said first locking means for a servlcing operation;

2. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing member, a mounting bracket rigidly secured to said housing member, a first frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said bracket, a pipe-like support member, a second frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said support member with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said housing member about the axis of said bearing surfaces, means for drawing said first and second bearing surfaces into intimate face-to-face engagement so that said housing member is frictionally locked to said support member in -a desired angular position relative thereto, first and second mutually engageable stop means respectively connected to said support member and said housing member, one of said stop means being rotatable about the axis of said engaged bearing surfaces relative to both said support member and said housing member, and means for locking said rotatable stop means to its associated member when said housing member is locked in said angular position and when said stop means are mutually engaged.

3. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket rigidly secured to said housing, a first tapered bearing surface formed on said' bracket, a pipe-like support, a second tapered bearing surface formed on said support with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis thereof, an annular ring .havin'ga first radially projecting stop surface mounted on said support for rotation about said axis, a second radial stop Surface integral with said bracket and mutually engageable with said first stop surface, means for drawing said first and second bearing surfaces into intimate 'face-to-face engagement so that said housing is frictionally locked to said support in a desired angular position relative thereto, and means for locking said ring to said support with said stop surfaces in engagement when said housing is locked in position.

4. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket member rigidly secured to said housing, a first frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said bracket member, a pipe-like support member having a hollow mounting boss formed thereon, a second frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said boss with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis of said bearing surfaces, a connecting bar received within said hollow boss and coaxial with said bearing surfaces, a truncated cone formed on one end of said bar for reception in a complementary recess formed in one of said members, a polygonal flange formed on the opposite end of said bar for slidable reception in a complementary opening formed in the other of said members, first releasable locking means for frictionally locking the cone end of said bar to its associated member, and second releasable locking means for 1ocking said polygonal flange in the complementary opening formed in the other of said members.

5. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket member rigidly secured to said housing, a first frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said bracket member, a pipe-like support member having a hollow mounting boss formed thereon, a second frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said boss with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis of said bearing surfaces, a connecting bar received within said hollow :boss and coaxial with said bearing surfaces, a truncated cone formed on one end of said bar for reception in a complementary recess formed in one of said members, a polygonal flange formed on the opposite end of said bar for slidable reception in a complementary opening formed in the other of said members, first releasable locking means for frictionally locking the cone end of said bar to its associated member, second releasable locking means for locking said polygonal flange in the complementary opening formed in the other of said members, and resilient means for normally biasing one of said members in an axial direction so as toyieldably maintain said bearing surfaces in engagement.

6. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket rigidly secured to said housing, a first frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said bracket, a pipe-like support having a hollow mounting boss formed thereon, a second frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said boss with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis of said bearing surfaces, a connecting bar received within said hollow boss and coaxial with said bearing surfaces, a truncated cone formed on one end of said bar for reception in a complementary recess formed in said support, a polygonal flange formed on the opposite end of said bar for slidable reception in a complementary opening formed in said bracket, first releasable locking means for frictionally locking the cone end of said bar to said support, and second releasable locking means for locking said polygonal flange in the complementary opening formed in said bracket.

7. A flood lamp assembly comprising, in combination, a lamp housing, a mounting bracket rigidly secured to said housing, a first frusto-coni-cal bearing surface formed on said bracket, a pipe-like support having a hollow mounting boss formed thereon, a second frusto-conical bearing surface formed on said boss with said first and second surfaces being complementary, means for telescopically mounting said first and second bearing surfaces for pivotal movement of said lamp housing about the axis of said bearing surfaces, a connecting bar received within said hollow boss and coaxial with said bearing surfaces, a truncated cone formed on one end of said bar for reception in acomplementary recess formed in said support, a polygonal fla ng'e formed on the opposite end of said bar for slidable reception in a complementary opening formed in said bracket, "first releasable locking means forfrictionally lock-ing the cone end of said bar to said support, second releasable locking means for locking said polygonal flange in the complementary opening formed in said bracket, and resilient means for normally biasing said bracket in an axial direction so as to yieldably maintain said bearing surfaces in engagement and said flange coupled to said bracket.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 490,903 1/93 Gartland 240-73 1,312,792 8/19 Burnham 200-133 1,65 8,905 2/ 28 Sandin 200-133 2,071,159 2/37 Benjamin 240-44.2 2,083,506 6/37 Rose 24044.2 2,116,050 5/38 Stock et al. 240-73 2,177,639 10/39 Erickson 240-44.2 2,193,272 3/40 Crossley 248-291 2,458,967 '1/4-9 Wiedenhoeft 240-73 2,481,531 9/49 Phillips 240-41.55 2,587,917 3/52 Stone 248-291 2,678,794 5 54 Thibault 248-291 2,700,525 1/ 55 Means 248-291 2,797,312 6/57 Fletcher 24041.55 2,850,622 9/58 Johnson 240-81 2,898,447 8/59 Hanlon 240-52 NOR-TON ANSHER, Primary Examiner.

JOSEPHD. BEIN, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3459934 *Jan 12, 1967Aug 5, 1969Esquire IncLight fixture
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US6224242May 26, 1999May 1, 2001U.S. Philips CorporationLuminaire
US8737043Mar 8, 2012May 27, 2014Ericson Manufacturing Co.Electrical enclosure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification362/371
International ClassificationF21S8/00, F21W131/10, F21V21/30
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/30
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 23, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: APPLETON ELECTRIC COMPANY
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:EMERSON NEWCO INC., A DE CORP;REEL/FRAME:004035/0436
Owner name: EMERSON NEWCO INC., A CORP. OF DEL.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:APPLETON ELECTRIC COMPANY.,;REEL/FRAME:004040/0026
Effective date: 19820323