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Publication numberUS3213409 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1965
Filing dateAug 19, 1963
Priority dateAug 19, 1963
Publication numberUS 3213409 A, US 3213409A, US-A-3213409, US3213409 A, US3213409A
InventorsBailey Paul C, Gimber George A
Original AssigneeBailey Paul C, Gimber George A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Condition selector apparatus
US 3213409 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 19, 1965 P. C. BAILEY ETAL.

CONDITION SELECTOR APPARATUS Filed Aug. 19, 1963 INVENTORS PAUL C. BAILEY GEORGE A. GIMBER BY IIIIII" W |I A TORNEY United States Patent O 3,213,409 CONDITION SELECTOR APPARATUS Paul C. Bailey, Warminster, and George A. Gimber, Hatboro, Pa., assiguors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Aug. 19, 1963, Ser. No. 303,188 7 Claims. (Cl. 340--2) (Granted under Title 35, U.S. Code (1952), sec. 266) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

The present invention relates to launched stores of the type having selectable conditions for devices contained therein, and more particularly to an air-launched buoy and launching apparatus therefor which enables individual selection of the operating depth up to and simultaneously with launching.

Air-launched buoys are useful in several fields such as oceanography and anti-submarine warfare. The buoy is dropped from an aircraft into the sea where it pays out a device to an operating depth for performing some desired function such as measuring, transmitting or receiving some underwater phenomena. One example is the airlaunched sonobuoys which have become extremely useful anti-submarine warfare devices for obtaining comprehensive underwater searches over large sea areas. A large number of these sonobuoys are dispatched in rapid succession from an airplane over an area of interest. Each sonobuoy is automatically self-conditioned after launching for projecting or receiving sound intelligence from a predetermined operating depth in the sea, and radio transmitting underwater sound intelligence to a remote tactical receiving station. The operating depth is determined by the payout length of the hydrophone cable in the sonobuoy. It is understood, of course, that the term hydrophone embraces transducers capable of either projecting or receiving sound waves; and the term operating depth refers to the depth below sea level to which the hydrophone is lowered for projecting or receiving the sound waves. Some types of buoys include a manual selector for choosing between one of several cable payout lengths or operating depths. Obviously, manual selection must be executed before the buoy reaches the launcher. Where the launcher is fed from a magazine holding a large number of buoys, the cable payout lengths selected at loading time for each buoy cannot be readily changed during a tactical mission. Some missions were not entirely eifective wherein the buoys had to be launched in the condition for which they were set at magazine loading time. On other missions, it means the expenditure of one or more buoys simply to reach a buoy in the magazine having the desired cable payout length.

Heretofore, the cable payout length selection was usually accomplished at the time the buoy was assembled, or an aperture was required in the side of the buoy casing for access to an internal selector mechanism. Recent developments in buoy launching techniques contemplate launching buoys in containers which are substantially jettisoned. A penetratable seal had to be incorporated in the container to permit access for depth selection of assembled sonobuoys.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an air-launched buoy and launcher combination in which the operating depth can be determined at the time of launching, and in which the operating depth can be extemporaneously and quickly changed consonant with rapid-succession launching.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel buoy operating depth selector which can only be operated at the time of launching, which is remotely operated 3,213,409 Patented Oct. l 9, 1 965 ICC without physical access to the inside of the buoy, which is unaffected by spurious environmental forces, and which cannot be accidentally or inadvertently placed in an operative condition such as by dropping.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved buoy depth selector especially suitable for use with a buoy air-launched in its own container from a magazinetype, rapid-succession buoy launcher, in which the buoy cable payout can be extemporaneously changed from one predetermined length to another length for successively launched buoys.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel operating depth selector which is especially suitable for use with an air-launched sonobuoy and its associated magazine-type rapid succession launcher,I in which the hydrophone cable payout can be extemporaneously and easily selected from several predetermined lengths, and in which the need is eliminated for physical access to the inside of the sonobuoy to make the selection.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved buoy operating depth selector constructed of a minimum of parts, which is inexpensive to manufacture and simple to assemble, which is sturdy and reliable at high acceleration and which will resist high impact loadmg.

Various other objects and advantages will appear from the following description of one embodiment of the invention, and the most novel features will be particularly pointed out hereinafter in connection with the appended claims.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 pictorially represents a sonobuoy launcher, partly cut away and viewed from the right-rear and below, with a sonobuoy therein ready for launching;

FIG. 2 represents a longitudinal cross-sectional View of the forward portion of the sonobuoy shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 represents a transverse cross-sectional view of the sonobuoy as taken along the line 3*?, of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4a schematically represents an electrical circuit contained in the sonobuoy with a switch therein being further shown in longitudinal cross-section and in initially open position;

FIG. 4b represents a longitudinal cross-section of the switch of FIG. 4a in a subsequently closed position; and

FIG. 5 represents a transverse cross-sectional View of the initially open switch as taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4a.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, a launcher indicated generally by the numeral 10 cornprises a nacelle 11 and a pod fairing 12 which are adapted to be Secured to a lower surface of an aircraft and oriented relative to the aircraft for maintaining aerodynamic stability. A sonobuoy 13 is shown by dotted outline longitudinally disposed in the nacelle 11 ready for launching by an `automatic dispensing mechanism, not shown. The manner of dispensing does not form a part of this invention, and it is contemplated that any conventional apparatus can be so adapted. After release by the launcher 10, the sonobuoy 13 is propelled aftward into free ight through an opening 14 at the rear of the nacelle 11. It is also contemplated that the automatic dispensing mechanism will `be of the type which transports another sonobuoy through the fairing '12 into the nacelle 11 to replace 4the launched sonobuoy 13 and to prepare for subsequent launching. As shown in the cut-away section of the nacelle 11, an electrical solenoid 16 is helically coiled about the inner periphery of the nacelle 11 for producing thereby a magnetic ytield whose lines of force run parallel to the longitudinal axis of the nacelle 11. The solenoid 16 is selectively energized lby `an electric circuit which includes a remotely located manual depth selector switch 17 and a power supply 18. The

location of the switch 17 in the aircraft is such as to be accessible to the pilot of the aircraft or to a tactical command operator. Though not shown, it is contemplated that the Sonobuoy 13 may also be contained in a container which is simultaneously ejected from the launcher and subsequently ejected from the Sonobuoy 13.

The Sonobuoy 13 and its container if used, are constructed substantially of non-magnetic materials which will Vnot Isignificantly interfere with or alter the magnetic field generated by the solenoid 16 as they pass th-rough the field. Of course it is further understood that the magnetic field so generated will likewise not interfere with the` normal operation of the mechanical and electrical components contained in -the Sonobuoy y13.

The air-launched sono-buoy 13 is fundamentally a ballistic configuration having a speed retarding mechanism for retarding its descent for a low-impact landing on the surface of the sea. A more detailed description of such a Sonobuoy is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 3,093,808 for an Air-Dropped Miniature Sonobuoy by George I. Tatnall et al. issued June 1l, 1963. When the Sonobuoy 13 of the present invention is dropped into sea water, the ballistic configuration transforms into a flotation buoy with a hydrophone depending therefrom Iby means of a cable. Such a transformation is best described with reference to FIG. 2. The forward portion of the rSonobuoy 13 is shown as comprising a forward cylindrical casing 19 having a weighted nose portion 19 closing the front end thereof and open at the rear end. The rear portion comprises an aft cylindrical casing 21 coaxially interfitted in tandem to the casing 19 and supports, inter alia, the retarding and flotation apparatus, not shown, anda radio transmitter 22. Upon immersion of the sonobuoy 13 in the sea, two sea-activated batteries 23 and 24, conveniently secured to the aft casing 21 become exposed to the water and generate voltages thereby. The voltage from the battery 23 fires an explosive bolt 26 to release a cross-shaped leaf spring 27 at the center thereof. When unstressed, the spring 27 is normally concave but it is held flat by the bolt Z6. In returning to its normal unstressed position after release by the bolt 26, the peripheral ends of the spring 27 withdraw from radi-ally aligned slots 28 and 29 in the intertting ends of the casings 19 and 21, respectively. A more detailed description of such a spring 27 and associated parts is set `forth in patent application Serial No. 280,474 for Coupling Device by Edward J. Cotilla et al. filed May 14, 1963, now Patent No. 3,140,886.

With theabove-described arrangement, the forward casing 19 is permitted to descend in the water thereby exposing another sea-activated -battery 31 secured to the forward end of the aft casing 21. The battery 31 may be 4supported Iby the casing 21 in the xed relation illustrated, with a short power supply cable 32 connected to the transmitter 22; or the battery 31 may depend from the aft casing 21 -by lengthening the cable `32. The latter arrangement is helpful for alleviating electrical leakage from the battery 31. A line-type hydrophone, indicated generally 'by the numeral 33 and comprising a plurality of acousto-electric transducers 34, is nestled in the weighted nose portion 19 `of the forward casing 19 with a transducer connecting cable 36 compactly wound about the transducers 34. The cable 36 connects to a pre-amplifier 37 sealed in the forward end of a hydrophone cable cannister 38 which is turn is slidably inserted into the open end of the forward casing 19 until it abuts the weighted nose portion 19 thereof. The cannister 38 is held completely within the casing 19 by a double-acting detent spring 39 fixed intermediate of its ends of the forward end of the cannister 38 and radially extending into a coaxial circular recess 41 in the weighted nose portion 19. A hydrophone cable 42 connected to the output of the pre-amplifier 37 is prewound into an annular configuration of even layers in the cannister 38 so that the cable 42 will pay out through an opening 43 at the rear end of cannister 38 without entanglement or snagging. The cable is preferably coated with an adhering compound suicient to retain the :annular configuration during pay out.

The detent spring 39 provides longitudinal resistance to separation of the cannister 38 and the casing 19 as the latter descends in the water paying out the cable 42. The weighted nose portion 19 affords su'icient force for the cable adhering compound to yield and progressively dispense or pay out the cable 42 and thereby gradually lower the hydrophone 33 to the desired operating depth. However, when the cable 42 has reached its payout limit and the cannister v38 is halted from further descent, the detent spring 39 yields to the continued downward force exerted by the casing 19 thereby permitting sepa-ration between the cannister 38 and the casing 19. The hydrophone 33 is thus exposed and unravels into its extended operative position, unobstructed by the casing 19.

The particular depth to which the hydrophone is lowered is determined by either the total length of the cable 42 as wound in the cannister 38 or the position of a cable loop 44 placed in cable 42 and protruding through a small aperture 46 on the rear end of the cannister 38. The Sonobuoy 13 is assembled with a squib-actuated plunger 47 secured to the rear end of the cannister 38 and initially extending into the cable loop 44 thereby limiting the payout of the cable 42 to some amount less than its total length. The loop 44 can be placed at any point along the total length of the cable 42 and, accordingly, determines the depth to which the hydrophone 33 will descend when the plunger 47 is in the normally extending position as shown in the drawing.

The squib-actuated plunger 47 is electrically connected in series through a cable 48 and a releasable connector 49, such as a bayonet-type to an inertially-released, magnetically-actuated switch 51 and the sea-activated battery 24. The switch 51 and one of the mating elements of the connector 49 are fixed in a convenient location to the aft casing 21 or its associated elements. The cable 48 is slightly longer than required thus insuring that the plunger 47 will be actuated by the battery 24 through the switch 51 if closed even though the casings 19 and 21 have been inadvertently separated by earlier firing of the explosive bolt 26.

As noted previously, the plunger 47 is initially set to limit the hydrophone cable payout to an intermediate amount determined by the position of the loop 44. The inertially-released, magnetically-actuated switch 51 cooperates with the solenoid 16 and the remote switch 17 to alter the hydrophone cable payout from the intermediate amount to the total length by causing the plunger 47 to withdraw from its extending position in the loop 44. The manner in which this is accomplished, is best described with reference to FIGS. 4a and 4b which show the switch 51 in longitudinal cross section.

The switch 51 is basically of the reed type having an elongated enclosure 52 which is of a relatively nonmagnetic material supporting at each end an electrically conductive reed 53 and 54, respectively. The free ends of the reeds 53 and 54 laterally confront each other in spaced relation such that there is no electrical contact therebetween. An electrically nonconductive inertial mass 56 which is slidable along the length of the reed 54 is initially urged between the free ends of the reeds 53 and 54 by a spring 57 helically wound about the reed 54 and compressed between the mass 56 and the adjacent end of the enclosure 52. The reeds 53 and 54 further exhibit magnetic properties, such as possessed by ferrites, whereby a magnetic ux introduced parallel to the length of the reeds 53 and 54 will cause the free ends thereof to be magnetically attracted to each other and make contact but for the interposition of the inertial mass 56. When the interial mass 56 has been moved out of its interposing position such as by an acceleration force against the spring 57, and a magnetic field is present, the free ends of the reeds 53 and 54 will be of opposite magnetic poles and make contact to complete the electric circuit which includes the plunger 47 and the battery 24. This switch position is shown entirely in solid lines in FIG. 4b. A mechanical latch spring 58, FIG. 5, insures that electrical contact is sustained between the reeds 53 and 54 after cessation of the magnetic eld at the switch 51. Cessation of acceleration permits the inertial mass 56 to return to the position shown in broken outline in FIG. 4b. The electrical contact between reeds 53 and 54, however, is not interrupted thereby.

Operation Operation of the invention should now be apparent from the foregoing description. In preparing for a tactical submarine search mission, each sonobuoy 13 is constructed with a predetermined total length of hydrophone cable 42 representing the deep position of two useful operating depths. The cable 42 is then Wound into the cannister 38 with the loop 44 positioned along the length of the cable 42 at a location representing the shallow operating depth. Each sonobuoy 13 is assembled with the squib-actuated plunger 47 extending into the loop 44 and the switch 51 is armed with the inertia mass 56 interposed between the free ends of the reeds 53 and 54 thus insuring against accidental electrical contact due to vibration and shock during handling. The sonobuoys 13 are then loaded, with or without containers, into a magazine-type launcher. When each sonobuoy 13 has reached the launching position, it is in the position shown in FIG. 1. At the time of launching, the pilot or operator must decide which of the two operating depths, deep or shallow, he desires for the sonobuoy 13 and must so position the switch 17.

Should the pilot decide on the shallow depth position, the switch 17 is set so that the solenoid 16 is deenergized. Thus, when the sonobuoy 13 is launched and the inertial mass S6 slides along reed 54 against the force of the spring 57, the reeds 53 and 54 remain out of contact with each other and the plunger 47 remains extending into the loop 44. After launching, the acceleration of the sonobuoy 13 decreases and the member 56 returns to its original position between the reeds 53 .and 54, After complete immersion in the sea, the batteries 23 and 24 generate electric voltages. The voltage from the battery 24 is of no consequence because its output is disconnected by the switch 51. The battery 23, however, generates sufficient voltage to detonate the explosive bolt 26 and separate the casings 19 and 21 in the manner described hereinabove. The casing 19 and the equipment contained therein proceed to descend paying out the cable 42 until the loop 44 is reached, whereupon the weight of the casing 19 urges the detent spring 39 to yield and allow the casing 19 to drop free from the cannister 3S. The hydrophone 33 is thus exposed at the selected shallow operating depths.

If the pilot decides that the sonobuoy 13 should operate at its deep depth, the switch 17 is set to energize the solenoid 16 thereby producing a magnetic flux parallel to the length of the launcher 11. When the sonobuoy 13 is released, the inertia mass 56 slides out from between the reeds 53 and 54 of the switch 51 and the sonobuoy 13 passes through the energized solenoid 16. As the switch S1 in the sonobuoy 13 passes through the magnetic field, the reeds 53 and 54- rnake `contact due to their magnetic attraction and are latched into contact by the latch spring 58. After the sonobuoy 13 becomes fully immersed in the sea, and the sea-activated batteries 23 and 24 are exposed, the voltage generated by the battery 24 operates the plunger 47 to cause it to withdraw from the loop 44. The casing 19 separates in the same manner as described above but the cable 42 will now pay out for its entire length thereby lowering the hydrophone 33 to the deep operating position.

Many of the advantages of the present invention over prior art methods and devices should now be apparent.

In anti-submarine warfare, for instance, the invention as described enables an operator to select a hydrophone operating depth at the time of sonobuoy launching from an aircraft, and further permits unanticipated changes in operating depth as conditions dictate during a sonobuoy deployment. Optimum aircraft mission capability is enhanced by the in-iiight choice of operating depths made possible to the operator. Iettisoning sonobuoys from the launcher merely because of their inappropriately set operating depths has been completely eliminated. Search missions and oceanographic surveys have been thusly made more effective by the present invention. The itivention is also ideally suited for the current trend toward individual container-enclosed sonobuoys where physical access into the sonobuoy to make depth selections is still necessary. The invention permits the container and casing for each sonobuoy to be of smooth, uninterrupted outer construction. An interlock concept in the invention further prohibits inadvertent alteration of depth selection such as may occur from impact during handling.

It should be apparent that the invention is not restricted solely to depth selection as specifically disclosed. For example, instead of depth, the selected condition may be the operating life before scuttling. Also the selective condition may relate to any other type of store which is launched under accelerative conditions through a selectively imposed magnetic field.

It will be understood, of course, that various changes in the details, materials, steps and arrangement of parts, which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A depth selector apparatus, comprising, in combination:

an air-launched sonobuoy automatically separable into a floatable unit and a sinkable unit when immersed in sea water, said lioatable and sinkable units respectively including a radio and a hydrophone;

a hydrophone cable of predetermined overall payout length prewound into said sinkable unit with one end electrically connected to said hydrophone and the `other end to said radio, said cable being prewound for progressive payout and having a protruding loop therein at a predetermined intermediate position along the overall payout length;

an electrically actuated plunger operatively secured to said sinkable unit and removably extending into said loop;

a first electric circuit comprising a sea-activated battery, connector means and a lirst switch each operatively secured to said iioatable unit and electrically connected in series to said plunger for energizing said plunger when `said battery is immersed in sea water and said first switch is closed, said battery being located on said oatable unit for exposure to the sea Water when said fioatable unit becomes immersed;

said first switch further including an elongated enclosure, a pair of electrically conductive, magnetizable reeds, each reed being secured at one of its ends to respective ends of said enclosure, and having the free ends thereof confronting each other in spaced relation, an electrically non-conductive mass slidably mounted on one of said reeds and movable along the length thereof, force-exerting means operatively connected between said enclosure and said mass for urging the latter between said confronting ends of said reeds and latch means fixed to the free end of one of said reeds for maintaining the free ends in intimate electrical connection after said mass is out of interposing relation and said reeds have been attracted to each other by a magnetic field;

a launcher formed to be installed on an aircraft for dispensing said sonobuoy on a command signal;

an electric solenoid xed to said launcher adjacent to the exit thereof for producing a magnetic field sufcient to attract said reeds of said rst switch to each other; and

a second electric circuit comprising a power supply, connector means and a second switch adapted to be operatiyely secured in the aircraft and electrically connected in series to said solenoid for manually energizing said solenoid;

whereby the selected position of said second switch at the time of launching determines the payout length of said cable after immersi-on of the sonobuoy in sea water.

2. A depth selector apparatus, comprising, in combination an air-launched sonobuoy automatically separable into a oatable unit and a sinkable unit when immersed in sea water, said flo-atable and sinkable units respectively including a radio and a hydrophone;

a hydrophone cable of predetermined overall length prewound into one of said units with one end electrically connected to said hydrophone and the other end to said radio, said cable being prewound for progressive payout and having a protruding loop therein at a predetermined intermediate position along the overall length;

iirst means electrically operated and cooperatively related with said loop;

`second means acceleration released and magnetically actu-ated for electrically energizing said first means after said sonobuoy is immersed in sea water;

a tlauncher formed to be installed on an aircraft for dispensing said sonobuoy on a command signal; and

third means for selectively producinga magnetic field adjacent to the exit of said launcher suicient to operate said second means;

whereby the payout length of said cable is determined at launching time and effected after immersion of the sonobuoy in sea water. Y

3. A depth selector apparatus, comprising, in combination an air-launched buoy automatically separable into a floatable unit and a sinkable unit when immersed in sea water;

a cable of predetermined overall payout length prewound into said sinkable unit with one end connected to said sinkable unit and the other end to said floatable unit, said prewound cable having a protruding loop therein at a predetermined position along the overall length;

an electrically 'actuated plunger operatively secured to said sinkable unit and removably extending into said loo a firstpelectric circuit comprising a sea-activated battery, connector means and a iirst switch each operatively secured to said floatable unit and electrically connected in series to said plunger for energizing said plunger when said battery is immersed in sea water and said rst switch is closed, said battery being located on said oatable unit for exposure to the sea water when said oatable unit becomes immersed;

said first `switch further including an elongated enclosure, a pair of electrically conductive, magnetizable reeds, each reed being secured at one of its ends to respective ends of said enclosure, and having the free ends thereof confronting each other in spaced relation, .an electrically non-conductive mass slidably mounted on one of said reeds and movable along the length thereof, force exerting means operatively connected between said enclosure and said mass for urging the latter between said confronting ends of said reeds, and latch means fixed to the free end of one of said reeds for maintaining the free ends in intimate electrical connection after said mass is out 8 Y Y of interposing relation and said contacts have been attracted to each other by a magnetic eld;

a launcher formed to be installed on an aircraft for dispensing said -buoy on la command signal;

an electric solenoid fixed to said launcher adjacent to the exit thereof for producing a magnetic eld suflicient to attract said reeds of said iirst switch to each other;

a second electric circuit comprising a power supply, connector means and a se-cond switch adapted to be operatively secured in the aircraft and electrically connected in series to said solenoid for manually energizing said solenoid;

whereby the selected position of said second switch at the time of launching determines the payout length of said ca'ble after immersion of the buoy in sea water.

4. A depth selector apparatus, comprising, in combination:

an air-launched buoy automatically separable into a iloatable unit and a sinlcable unit when immersed in sea water;

a cable of predetermined overall length prewound into one of said units with one end connected to said sinkable unit and the other end to said oatable unit, said cable being prewound for progressive payout and having a protruding loop therein at a predetermined intermediate position along the overall length;

rst means electrically operated and cooperatively related with said loop;

second means lacceleration released and magnetically actuated for energizing said first means after said buoy is immersed in sea water;

a launcher formed to be installed on an aircraft for dispensing said buoy on \a command signal; and third means for selectively producing a magnetic field adjacent to the exit of said launcher sufficient to operate said second means;

whereby the payout length of said cable is determined at launching time and eiected after immersion of the buoy in sea water.

5. An electric switch device, comprising:

an elongated enclosure;

a pair of electrically conductive, magnetizable reeds,

each reed being secured a-t one of its ends to respective ends of said enclosure, and having the free ends thereof confronting each other in spaced relation;

an electrically non-conductive mass slidably mounted on one of said reeds and movable along the length thereof;

force-exerting means operatively connected between said enclosure and said mass for urging the latter between said confronting free ends of said reeds;

means for establishing a magnetic field through said reeds thereby rendering them magnetically attractive to each other; and

latch means secured to the free end of one of said reeds for maintaining the free ends in intimate electrical contact after said mass is out of interposing relation yand the magnetic attraction therebetween is removed.

6. A condition selector apparatus, comprising in combination:

a launchable store having a device selectively operable in either of two conditions;

electrical means secured in said store and operatively connected to said device for effecting the condition selection;

a first electric circuit comprising a power supply, connector means and a lirst switch each operatively secured in said store and electrically connected in series to said electrical means for energization thereof;

said first switch further including an elongated enclosure, a pair of electrically conductive, magnetizable reeds, each reed being secured at one of its ends to respective ends of said enclosure, and having the free ends thereof confronting each other in space relation;

an electrically non-conductive mass slidably mounted on one of said reeds and movable along the length thereof;

`force exerting means operatively connected between said enclosure and said mass for urging the latter between said confronting ends of said reeds;

latch means Xed to the free end of one of said reeds for maintaining the free ends in intimate electrical connection after said mass is out of interposing relation and said contacts have been attracted to each other by a magnetic eld;

a launcher for dispensing said store on a command signal;

an electric solenoid fixed to said launcher adjacent to the exit thereof for producing a magnetic field suflicient to attract said reeds of said rst switch to each other; and

a second electric circuit comprising a power supply,

connector means and a second switch electrically connected in series to said solenoid for manually energizing said solenoid;

whereby the selected position of said second switch at the time of launching determines the operating condition of said device.

7. A condition selector apparatus, comprising in combination:

a launchable store having a device selectively operable in either of two conditions;

actuator means secured in said store and operatively connected to said device for electing the condition selection;

first electrical means acceleration released and magnetically actuated operatively connected to said actuator means;

a launcher for dispensing said store on a command signal;

solenoid means fixed to said launcher adjacent to the exit thereof for producing a magnetic field sufficient to operate said rst electric means; and

a second electric means for manually energizing said solenoid;

whereby `the selected position of said second electric means at the time of launching determines the operating condition of said device.

References Cited hy the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,397,123 3/46 Brown 317-157 2,558,188 6/51 McWilliams 200-104 X 2,963,562 12/60 Mishler 20G-61,45 2,976,378 3/61 Goddard 200-61.45 3,057,976 10/62 Weaver 200-61.45 3,093,808 6/ 63 Tatnall et al 340-2 CHESTER L. JUSTUS, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2397123 *Apr 30, 1943Mar 26, 1946Bell Telephone Labor IncContact operation
US2558188 *Mar 12, 1947Jun 26, 1951Bell Telephone Labor IncContact actuating mechanism
US2963562 *Dec 7, 1959Dec 6, 1960Mishler Charles GMagnetic g load actuated switch
US2976378 *Jun 3, 1958Mar 21, 1961Lockheed Aircraft CorpAcceleration responsive devices
US3057976 *Jan 15, 1960Oct 9, 1962Maxson Electronics CorpAcceleration switch
US3093808 *Feb 29, 1960Jun 11, 1963Gimber George AAir-dropped miniature sonobuoy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4216535 *Mar 20, 1978Aug 5, 1980Bunker Ramo CorporationSystem for deploying a moored sensor array
US4560228 *Jun 10, 1983Dec 24, 1985The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyFor aircraft
US4568303 *Apr 27, 1984Feb 4, 1986Brown Paul LToy for electronically playing rhythmical melody upon rotation or revolution thereof
US5014248 *Feb 5, 1974May 7, 1991The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyAir-deliverable, ice-penetrating sonobuoy
Classifications
U.S. Classification367/4, 335/278, 200/61.45M, 200/61.45R, 307/121, 335/253
International ClassificationG10K11/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10K11/006
European ClassificationG10K11/00G2