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Publication numberUS3213572 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1965
Filing dateDec 1, 1961
Priority dateDec 14, 1960
Also published asDE1144904B
Publication numberUS 3213572 A, US 3213572A, US-A-3213572, US3213572 A, US3213572A
InventorsJohannes Hohla
Original AssigneeJohannes Hohla
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-storied building construction
US 3213572 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR WEEZIMEE== Z JOHANNES HOHLA ATTORNEY Oct. 26, 1965 J. HOHLA MULTI-STORIED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed D60. 1. 1961 Iz i ZiM-M Oct. 26, 1965 J. HQHLA 3,213,572

MULTISTORIED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 1. 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 8 6 l 8 0o 1 1/ i 7 3m in "H? 3 3' I; g I lllllllllll I I 51 g 3b INVENTOR JOHANNELS HOHLA WQM ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,213,572 MULTI-STORIED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Johannes Hohla, Forstmannstrasse 95, Essen-Werden, Germany Filed Dec. 1, 1961, Ser. No. 156,241 Claims priority, application Germany, Dec, 14, 1960, H 41,212 Claims. (Cl. 52-73) This invention relates to an improved multi-storied building construction that is characterized by the use of a plurality of parallel, vertically-spaced horizontal truss means that extend longitudinally through the central portion of the building and are supported inter-mediate their ends by vertical central core pillar means. In accordance with the invention, the building includes a plurality of vertically-spaced reinforced concrete fioor slabs successive ones of which are connected at their longitudinal central portions with the upper and lower chords of the main truss means, respectively, whereby the lateral free ends of the floor slabs extend laterally outwardly from opposite sides of the main truss means in a cantilevered manner.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a building construction having central pillar means which support the various floor slabs by means of horizontal main trusses that extend in the longitudinal direction of the building. Successive floor slabs are carriedin a centrally-supported cantilevered manner-by the upper and lower chords, respectively, of the horizontal main trusses with the result that additional support-free usable space is provided between alternate stories of the building. As a consequence of the novel building construction, the successive floors may have different ceiling heights and/ or floor breadths, thus permitting customizing of the building to the needs of the tenant. Moreover, the central core pillar construction makes it possible to successively form the respective reinforced concrete floor slabs from the top of the building downward. Consequently, upon formation of the upper floor slabs, construction of the lower floor slabs may proceed regardless of weather conditions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a building structure having large-span floors the longitudinal central portions of which are supported solely by horizontal main truss means connected with vertical central pillar means, whereby the use of additional supporting columns arranged outside the core pillars is avoided, thus affording a maximum support-free usable floor area.

A further object of the invention is to provide a multistoried building construction of non-circular symmetrical configuration and including a framework structure having the greatest horizontal rigidity in that direction in which the greatest horizontal forces (wind pressure forces, for example) are developed. Consequently, the need for additional stiffening structural members such as windbracings or the like, .is avoided.

Otherobjects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from a study of the following specification when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is an end elevational view of the multistoried building;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 2--2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view of the components shown in FIGURE 2;

FIGURES 4 and 5 are sectional views taken along lines 4-4 and 5-5, respectively, of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary detailed sectional view taken along line 66 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is a somewhat schematic horizontal sectional view similar to FIGURE 5 of another embodiment of building construction having single central pillar means;

FIGURES 8 and 9 are somewhat schematic horizontal sectional views of two embodiments of multi-pillar constructions; and

FIGURE 10 is a detailed perspective view of the upper portion of the building construction of FIGURE 1.

Referring more particularly to FIGURES 1 and 10, the building framework includes central core pillar means including a .pair of spaced vertical pillars 2, 2' that are secured at their lower ends in the building foundation. Connected between the pillars 2, 2' are a plurality of parallel, vertically spaced main truss means that extend longitudinally through the central portion of the building. Each of the main truss means comprises a pair of parallel, horizontally spaced trusses 3, 3' having heights that correspond with the respective ceiling heights of the various floors. The main trusses 3, 3' are secured to the pillars 2, 2, respectively, and include upper and lower chords. Pairs of floor slabs 1 and 1' are connected at their central portions with the upper and lower chords, respectively, of the main truss pairs. The main trusses have level upper and lower surfaces and are preferably formed from profile steel, steel tubes, sheet metal, or reinforced concrete. If desired they may be prefabricated prior to connection with the pillars.

As shown in FIGURE 6 the upper and lower floor slabs 1 and 1' include, respectively, body portions 5 and 5 (that may be formed of reinforced concrete) and floor trusses 6 and 6 (that may be formed as solid webs, if desired). Slab 1 is rigidly connected at its center with the upper chords 3a, 3a of the main trusses 3 and 3', respectively, and slab 1' is rigidly connected with the lower chords 3b and 3b. The floor trusses 6 and 6' have horizontal upper surfaces upon which the floor is laid. In accordance with conventional architectural load transfer design, the lateral extremities of body portions 5 and 5 and the lower surfaces of the floor trusses are upwardly inclined relative to the horizontal. Consequently, at each side the floor slabs overhang the main trusses 3, 3', and the slab loads are transferred to the central pillars 2, 2' via the main trusses.

The pillars 2, 2', which preferably consist of sections 2a, 2b and 2a, 2b of reinforced concrete construction formed by conventional sliding or climbing mold techniques, are provided at their adjacent and remote surfaces with lateral extensions 7 for supporting the horizon? tal main trusses 3, 3' and the edge beams 8, respectively. The web thicknesses of the pillars are so selected that through proper reinforcing of the floor slabs, the development of rupturing shearing stresses in the pillars is avoided. As illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 7, the support means 7 for supporting the edge beams 8 may be in the form of vertical ribs the arrangement of which corresponds with the greatest wall stresses.

The horizontal main trusses 3, 3 and the edge beams 8 are supported in openings in, or protecting flanges on, the pillar walls. In certain casesas for example when the floor widths are smaller than the respective ceiling heights and when edge beams are connected to the assemblage as described below-for proper resistance to bending it is desirable to use pillars 2, 2 of trapezoidal cross-section the smaller dimensions of which are arranged outermost as shown in FIGURES 4 and 5.

In addition to the main trusses, the pillars support horizontal edge beams 8 (of optional height) adjacent the free ends of the floor slabs. According to the illustrated preferred embodiment these beams are formed of steel or reinforced concrete and are hollow. During formation of the reinforced-concrete floor slabs, the respective edge beams may be raised (by suitable lifting means such as hydraulic jacks), from their supports on the pillars to positions in which they support the molds within which the floor slabs are cast. Upon hardening of the slabs, the edge beams are lowered to their illustrated positions. The beams may then be permanently secured in place for use as functional building elements (for example, as heating or air conditioning conduits). For larger main truss spans or overhangs, these edge beams may be designed to receive non-symmetrical loads from the floor slabs so that torsional stresses in the main trusses are diminished or avoided.

As illustrated diagrammatically in the embodiment of FIGURE 7, the pillars 80, 80 support the horizontal main trusses 81, 81' and the angularly arranged edge beams 82. The end beams 83 are supported by the beams 82 and the trusses 81, 81'.

It is important to note that for buildings which do not have circular or standard polygonal floor plans, resistance to bending in the direction in which the largest exernal forces are applied is obtained by providing a series of pillars each of which is arranged with its major cross-sectional axis normal to the horizontal longitudinal axis of the building.

Referring to the multiple-pillar construct-ion of FIG- URE 8, a plurality of pillars 91, 91, 92, 92', 93 and 93' are so arranged that the respective main trusses 94, 94' and the edge beams 95 carried thereby are colinear and spaced via expansion joint means. In the embodiment of FIGURE 9, the main trusses 101, 101' and the edge beams 102 are continuous and are supported by a series of pillars 103, 103, 104, 104', 105 and 105'.

As a consequence of the pillar, main truss, and overhanging floor slab construction, the floor slabs may be formed from the top of the building downward by progressive lowering of the floor slab molds. Simultaneous casting of floor slabs at various levels of the building may also be accomplished if desired. As shown in FIGURE 1, each of the slabs is support-free at its ends. Consequently, an appreciable amount of Window space may be provided in the building outer shell. Furthermore, the main trusses 3 and 3' extend only between alternate pairs of floors, thus providing additional useful space between the remaining floors. It is apparent that by the construction of the present invention, the various stories may be given arbitrary ceiling heights and the floors may be given differing breadths in accordance with the needs of the tenant.

Owing to the upward inclination of the lower surfaces of the fioor slabs, equipment may be readily installed on the various floors by the use of external cranes or other lifting devices. The principles of the present invention are applicable to the construction of office buildings, apartment houses, and hotels. Furthermore, the novel building construction is particularly suitable for use in the erection of industrial buildings (such as precision machine shops, mills, bakeries, etc.) that are custom built to receive particular machinery.

While the preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it is apparent that modifications may be made in the described construction without deviating from the scope of the invention set forth in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A multi-storied building construction having longitudinal and transverse axes of symmetry, comprising successive first, second, third and fourth horizontal vertically-spaced reinforced-concrete floor slabs arranged with their central longitudinal horizontal axes contained in a common vertical plane extending longitudinally through the center of the building;

a pair of parallel vertically-spaced horizontal main truss means extending longitudinally solely between said first and second and between said third and fourth floor slabs, respectively, the longitudinal axes of said main truss means being parallel and coplanar with the longitudinal axes of said floor slabs, said main truss means being contained solely between a pair of spaced vertical planes parallel with and on opposite sides of said common vertical plane, said pair of vertical planes being spaced inwardly from the longitudinal edges of said floor slabs, respect1vely, each of said horizontal main truss means including rigidly connected horizontal upper and lower chords secured to the floor slabs associated therewith, respectively, and extending substantially the lengths thereof;

and vertical pillar means extending upwardly through said floor slabs intermediate the ends thereof and connected with said horizontal main truss means solely intermediate their ends, whereby each of said floor slabs extends at each side outwardly beyond the associated horizontal main truss means in a cantilevered manner and whereby the space between said second and third floor slabs is unobstructed by any horizontal main truss means.

2. A multi-storied building construction, comprising a pair of coplanar parallel vertically-spaced horizontal man truss means each including rigidly connected horizontal upper and lower chords;

means supporting said main truss means solely between their ends comprising a pair of vertical pillars ar-- ranged on opposite sides of and connected with intermediate portions of said main truss means, each of said truss means extending longitudinally at each end beyond said vertical pillars;

successive first, second, third and fourth horizontal vertically-spaced reinforced concrete floor slabs arranged with their longitudinal axes coplanar with the axes of said horizontal main truss means, said first and second floor slabs and said third and fourth floor slabs being arranged on opposite of, and rigidly connected with the adjacent chords of, the lower and upper horizontal main truss means, respectively, each of said floor slabs extending at each side in a cantilevered manner laterally outwardly beyond the horizontal main truss means associated therewith, whereby the space between said second and third floor slabs is unobstructed by any horizontal main truss means.

3. A multi-storied building construction, comprising successive first, second, third and fourth horizontal vertically-spaced reinforced-concrete floor slabs arranged with their central longitudinal horizontal axes contained in a common vertical plane, all of said floor slabs having the same length and at least some of said slabs having different widths;

vertical pillar means including a pair of horizontally spaced vertical pillars extending upwardly through intermediate portions of said floor slabs on opposite sides of said common vertical plane, the outermost vertical edges of said pillars being spaced a distance substantially equal to the maximum width of said slabs, said pillars being also spaced from the ends of said slabs;

and a pair of parallel vertically-spaced horizontal main truss means extending longitudinally solely between said first and second and between said third and fourth floor slabs, respectively, the longitudinal axes of said main truss means being parallel and coplanar with the longitudinal axes of said floor slabs, each of said main truss -means being rigidly connected intermediate its ends with said vertical pillar means and extending longitudinally at each end horizontally therebeyond, said horizontal main truss means being contained solely between a pair of parallel longitudinal vertical planes passing through the adjacent surfaces of said pillars, each of said main truss means including rigidly connected horizontal upper and lower chords secured to the floor slabs associated therewith, respectively and extending substantially the lengths thereof, said horizontal main truss means being spaced inwardly from the longitudinal side,

edges of the slabs, whereby each of said floor slabs extends at each side outwardly beyond the associated horizontal main truss means in a cantilevered manner and whereby the space between said second and third floor slabs is unobstructed by any horizontal main truss means.

4. A multi-storied building construction, comprising successive first, second, third and fourth horizontal vertically-spaced reinforced concrete floor slabs arranged with their central longitudinal horizontal axes contained in a common vertical plane extending longitudinally through the center of the building;

a pair of horizontally-spaced vertical pillars arranged on opposite sides of said common vertical plane and extending upwardly through said floor slabs intermediate the ends thereof;

and a pair of parallel vertically spaced horizontal main truss means extending solely between said first and second and between said third and fourth floor slabs, respectively, the longitudinal axes of said main truss means being parallel and coplanar with the longitudinal axes of said floor slabs, each of said horizontal main truss means comprising a pair of generally rectangular, vertically arranged horizontal trusses rigidly secured to the adjacent surfaces of said pillars, respectively, each of said trusses including upper and lower horizontal chords secured to the adjacent floor slabs, respectively, and extending longitudinally the length thereof, said chords extending at each end horizontally beyond said vertical pillars, whereby each of said floor slabs extends at each side outwardly beyond the associated horizontal main trusses in a cantilevered manner and whereby the space between said second and third floor slabs is unobstructed by any horizontal main truss means. 5. A multi-storied building construction as defined in claim 4 wherein each of the floor slabs has in vertical transverse cross-section a generally V-shaped configuration with the lateral edges of the slab having a higher elevation than the longitudinal central portion.

uary 1951, page 80.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Architectural Forum Publication, vol. 94, Issue 1, Jan- Popular Mechanics Publication, December 1959, page FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

WILLIAM I. MUSHAKE, HENRY C. SUTHERLAND,

Examiners.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3719012 *Jul 24, 1970Mar 6, 1973Laurent FTower-construction with overhangs to support light-weight dwellings
US4656799 *Apr 28, 1986Apr 14, 1987Stratatowers CorpSuper high-rise buildings
US4736557 *Apr 2, 1987Apr 12, 1988Stratatowers CorporationSuper high-rise buildings
EP2235290A1 *Jul 9, 2008Oct 6, 2010Uttamrao Hanumantrao JadhavAn architectural structure and method thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/73, D25/5, 52/236.6, 52/745.4
International ClassificationE04B1/34
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/3404
European ClassificationE04B1/34B