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Publication numberUS3213769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1965
Filing dateJan 22, 1962
Priority dateJan 22, 1962
Publication numberUS 3213769 A, US 3213769A, US-A-3213769, US3213769 A, US3213769A
InventorsWilliam Smith John
Original AssigneeWilliam Smith John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for spreading and compacting surfacing material
US 3213769 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. W. SMITH Oct. 26, 1965 MACHINE FOR SPREADING AND COMPAC'IING SURFACING MATERIAL 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 22, 1962 m in INVENTOR.

Oct. 26, 1965 MACHINE FOR SPREADING AND COMPACTING SURFAGING MATERIAL Filed Jan. 22, 1962 &

J. W. SMITH 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 JJV/V WEI/[7H IN V EN TOR.

J. W. SMITH Oct. 26, 1965 s" Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 22, 1962 w 8, J mm Q 8 mm .r om 5 m M J. W. SMITH Oct. 26, 1965 MACHINE FOR SPREADING AND COMPACTING SURFACING MATERIAL 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 22, 1962 LLA JOHNW SMTH INVENTOR HISAGENT! United States Patent 3,213,769 MACHINE FOR SPREADKNG AND COMPACTING SURFACING MATERIAL John William Smith, 617 NW. 18th St., Oklahoma City, Okla. Filed Jan. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 167,873 4 Claims. (Cl. 9446) This application is a continuation-in-part of my prior application on a Machine for Spreading and Compacting Surface Material, Ser. No. 59,423 filed Sept, 29, 1960, and now abandoned.

This invention relates to machines for spreading material over the surface of the terrain, and more particularly to a machine for spreading paving material, such as prepared asphalt aggregate, over the terrain to a uniform, compacted thickness in a designated, laid out path.

Various paving machines have been proposed heretofore for spreading an asphalt mixture over the surface of the terrain, but these, for the most part, were heavy, cumbersome to handle, and usually required a separate compacting element, such as a steam roller or the like, to compact the material after it had been spread over the surface to be paved.

The present machine is comparatively light in weight, and is adapted to be connected to most types of dump trucks, which enables the utilization of the dump truck for the motive power to move the paving machine over the terrain, thereby effecting considerable saving over the cost of constructing a self-propelled machine.

The present machine is so constructed that it may be readily attached to a dump truck for moving the machine over the terrain, while the material, such as asphalt aggregate compound or the like, is dumped into the hopper thereof for spreading and compacting the asphalt aggregate compound or the like simultaneously with the movement of the paving machine over the terrain. The present machine is readily adaptable to be lifted bodily by the dump truck, to be moved from place to place, and to enable the machine to be placed in narrow passageways and the like.

An object of this invention is to provide a machine which is light in weight but sturdy in construction, and which is readily adaptable to be connected to a conventional dump truck, so as to be moved with the truck, and thereby spread and compact an asphalt aggregate compound or the like onto a surface to form a covering of uniform thickness.

Another object of the invention is to provide a paving machine which may be readily attached to or detached from a dump truck by the operator of the paving machine, without the necessity of the driver of the truck operating an accessory mechanism for the attachment or detachment of the paving machine from the truck.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a paving machine which may be readily lifted from the terrain by a dump truck to enable the maneuvering of the paving machine into relatively close places.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide a paving machine into which an asphalt aggregate compound may be dumped, which aggregate compound is spread and compacted to a uniform thickness over the terrain.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a paving machine which will distribute and compact asphalt aggregate paving material or the like in side-by-side strips, so that the adjoining edges of the strips of paving compound will be of uniform thickness and compacted to a uniform density.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a paving machine into which an asphalt aggregate compound may be dumped, which aggregate compound is "ice spread, compacted and rolled to a uniform thickness over the terrain.

And a final object of the invention is to provide a paving machine which will uniformly distribute, compact and roll asphalt aggregate material in uniform side-byside strips so that adjoining edges of the strips of paving will blend to form a uniform, uninterrupted surface.

With these objects in mind and others which will become manifest as the description proceeds, reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters designate like parts in the several views thereof, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the paving machine taken from the front and a side and slightly above the machine, with parts broken away and shown in section to bring out the details of construction;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view taken substantially from the rear of the machine;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the paving machine attached to a dump truck, and showing the paving machine lifted clear of the terrain thereby, with the paving machine being shown in full outline, and with the dump truck being shown in dashed outline;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, side elevational view of the front portion of the paving machine, in full outline, detached from the truck axle, with the axle and rear wheel of the truck being shown in dashed outline;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing a truck having a larger wheel than shown in FIGS. 3, 4, and 6, and showing the paving machine attached thereto by the use of tubular extension members over the upturned projections on the draw bars of the paving machine;

FIG. 6 is a substantially longitudinal, medial view taken through the paving machine, with portions of the paving machine being shown in section and portions being shown in full outline, and showing a dump truck in position to dump an asphalt aggregate compound into the hopper of the paving machine, the truck being shown in dashed outline, and showing the paving machine attached to the rear axle of the truck so as to be moved thereby, and showing the machine in position to spread and compact the asphalt aggregate compound as it is drawn over the terrain;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, elevational view of a portion of the paving machine as shown in FIG. 3, but with the side shields removed from the hopper to show the details of construction of the hopper;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary, elevational view of the lower end of an adjustment screw having a swivel clevis thereon, which screw and clevis are representative of certain adjustment means used on the paving machine;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a modification of the paving machine taken from a side and slightly above, with parts removed, and with other parts being shown as broken away and in section to bring out the details of construction and the side fenders thereof shown in phantom for convenience in illustration;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of a modification of the machine on a reduced scale, with parts being broken away and with parts being shown in dashed outline to show the paving being laid thereby;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the modified form of the invention taken approximately on the line 11-11 of FIG. 9, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows, and showing the paving material under a portion thereof;

FIG. 12 is a longitudinal sectional view through the modification of the paving machine in the position used for paving, and showing a portion of a dump truck in dashed outline in position to dump material into the paving machine; with the thickness of the paving material being laid by the machine being shown in dashed outline;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lower portion of the hopper dispensing gate, showing a portion of the frame of the modification of the machine, and showing the mechanism which operates to close the hopper dispensing gate in full outline, with the dashed outline showing the gate and mechanism fully open, with parts being broken away and with parts being shown in section to bring out the details of construction;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged, fragmentary elevational view of a portion of the spreader blade of the modified form of the invention, showing the adjustment devices therefor, together with a depth indicator thereon, with parts being broken away and shown in section to bring out the details of construction; and

FIG. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken transversely through the compacting roller of the modified form of the invention, and showing a fluid dispensing conduit leading thereto together with an applicator pad and scraper blade thereon.

First form of invention With more detailed reference to the drawing, the numeral 1 designates generally a dump truck having rear wheels 2 on an axle 4 thereof. Trucks, the wheels of which vary in size, may be used, as indicated in FIGS. 5 and 6, with the wheels 2a (FIG. 5) being larger than the wheels 2 (FIGS. 3, 4, and 6) with the axle 4a higher from the ground than the axle 4, which will be brought out more in detail hereinafter.

The paving machine proper is designated generally at 6, which machine has a frame 8 on which rear wheels 10 are rotatably mounted on an axle, which axle is fixed relative to the frame 8, and front wheels 12 are rotatably mounted on an axle 22, which axle is mounted on movable members 20, which members or beams are movable with respect to the forward end portion of the frame 8. The front end portion of the frame 8 is shown to be of tubular construction, and which frame has downturned end portions 14 to which forwardly extending draw bars 16 are secured. Each of the draw bars 16 has an upturned end portion 18, which is adapted to pass below the axle 4 or 4a of the truck when the portions 18 are in the lowermost position, and which projections may be raised to a position as indicated in FIG. 6, when it is desired to tow the paving machine over the terrain. The front wheels 12 are rotatably mounted on an axle 22, which axle is mounted near the forward ends of beams 20. The beams 20 are pivotally mounted on frame 8 by a pivot pin 24 which pivots the beams thereto intermediate the length of the beams. It is preferable to have two of these beams 20, spaced apart transversely, with a weight 26 secured therebetween, which weight, together with the weight of the beams, off-sets the weight of the wheels 12 and axle 22. Therefore, when the paving machine is lifted clear of the ground, as shown in FIG. 3, the weight 26 will cause the wheels 12 to attain a position above the terrain.

The beams 20 are connected together by bolts 27 which secures the weight 26 between the beams, which assembly has a loop 28 secured thereto at the rear end thereof, to which loop 28 a cable 30 is secured. The cable 30 extends over a sheave pulley 32 and through a tubular pipe 34, which pipe and cable pass through a material receiving hopper 36 so that the cable will be guided over a sheave pulley 38 mounted on the distal end of plunger 40 of a hydraulic jack 42, which jack is mounted on frame 8 near the hopper 36. The other end of cable 30 is connected to an anchor lug 46 on frame 8, so upon movement of hydraulic jack plunger 40 of jack 42, by actuation of a lever 44, the cable 30 will move weight 26 and the end of the beams 20 to which the cable 30 is connected, upward, which will cause front wheels 12 to be forced down against the terrain 48, which will move draw bars 16 into engagement with the lower side of axle 4 or axle 4a, and normally the projections 18 will be of sufficient height to engage the forward side of axle 4, so upon movement of the truck in a forward direction along the terrain, the paving machine will be drawn therealong.

The dump body of the truck 1 may be moved into elevated position, as shown in dashed outline in FIG. 6, so the asphalt aggregate compound or the like contained in the truck body, will be dumped into the hopper 36 or forward thereof, so that the loosely dumped asphalt aggregate compound or the like will either flow down through chute 50 at the lower portion of hopper 36 to the surface of the terrain or onto such other surface as is to be paved. The thickness of the asphalt aggregate compound which is passed down through chute 50 or thereunder will be determined by the height of the respective lower lip portions 52 and 54 of the chute 50. The asphalt aggregate compound is shown compacted at 49 in FIG. 6 in dashed outline.

The material is directed through the chute 50 onto the surface to be paved, whereupon an adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56, which is mounted transversely of the frame 8 to the rear of the hopper 36, is adjusted to define the thickness of the loose material that is to escape thereby to be formed into a covering for the terrain. The strike-off plate 56 is gauged as to height by means of screw elements 58 attached thereto and to the frame 8, one of which screw elements is positioned at each end of the adjustable, transverse strikeoff plate 56 so that a uniform thickness of asphalt aggregate compound is deposited throughout the length of the adjustable, transverse strike-oif plate, or when desired, one end of the adjustable, transverse strike-off plate may be lowered and the other end raised to a desired height, to give a feathering to an edge of the asphalt aggregate compound deposited. A second transverse strike-01f plate 60 is positioned immediately rearward of the adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56, and may likewise be adjusted to conform to the adjustment of adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56, or this second transverse strike-off plate 60 may be adjusted so as to be lower than the adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56, to further out the asphalt aggregate compound to the exact desired thickness.

A flat screed compacting element 62 extends rearward of the second transverse strike-off plate 60 and may be made integral therewith or attached thereto, which screed or compacting element 62 has an upturned edge 64 along the rear portion thereof. The screed or compacting element 62 has pairs of apertured lugs 66 thereon, a pair near each end thereof, which pairs of lugs each pivotally mount an apertured bar 68, which bars extend upward and are fitted in sliding relation within loops 69 which are secured to the frame 8 rearward of the hopper 36, as will be seen in FIG. 1, so the screed or compacting element 62 may be slanted at an angle with respect to the terrain, as indicated in FIG. 6, so that, upon the paving machine being moved forward, the asphalt aggregate compound, as it passes therebelow, is compacted, as indicated at 49 in FIG. 6, and the angle of the screed or compacting element 62 may be independently adjusted by adjustment of screw threaded element 70 which. is pivotally connected to lugs 71 at the rear edge of screed or compacting element 62 by pins which pass through apertured lugs 71 secured to the rear edge thereof. The screw threaded element 70 is connected, by an outstanding lug 72, to the apertured bar 68 to enable the angular adjustment of the screed or compacting element 62.

The screed or compacting element 62 has an adjustment screw 74 connected to each end thereof, which screws extend upward and pass through screw threaded elements which .are mounted on the frame 8 rearward of the hopper 36 so the screed or compacting element 62 may be adjusted vertically by movement of the screw threaded members 74, thereby maintaining the same angular adjustment of the screed or compacting element 62. With the screed or compacting element 62 adjusted in the manner described, the greatest pressure is applied to the rear end of the transverse screed or compacting element '62 where a relatively short length of blade is in extreme pressure contact with the material being compacted. Thus, in effect, a pressurized troweling action is accorded the asphalt aggregate compound 49 which passes thereunder, and the asphalt aggregate compound or the like being laid is troweled with a smooth finish and to a relatively high density of compacting, which approaches, or even exceeds the results accomplished from compacting with rollers or the like, as a substantial portion of the weight of the paving machine and of the material loaded thereinto, and a substantial portion of the Weight of the vehicle connected thereto can be directed to the troweling portion of the screed or compacting element 62 which contacts the asphalt aggregate compound or the like, as it is being spread.

It is to be pointed 1011f that the rear wheels of the paving machine rest upon the compacted asphalt aggregate compound 49 over which the screed or compacting element 62 has passed, therefore accurate gauging of the thickness of the asphalt aggregate compound 49 can be accomplished, as the wheels 10 roll on a uniformly smooth surface of the compacted material, whether it be foundation material which is being spread prior to the spreading of the asphalt aggregate compound or whether it be the asphalt aggregate compound 49.

The paving machine is provided with an elongated hopper 36, which is preferably eight feet in width, so it will be within the legal width limit as set by law in most States, and the wheels '10 are so positioned as to roll on the outer edges of the material being compacted. However, after the first strip of asphalt .aggregate compound 49 or the like has been laid, and additional strips are to be laid in side-by-side relation with respect thereto, a joint scratcher 7 8 is mounted on a side of frame 8 immediately rearward of one of the wheels 10, which joint scratcher 78 is adjusted so that the teeth 80 thereof will rake behind the wheel 10 which is riding on the joint between the strips being laid and the strip which has been laid, so that the joint is scratched to a uniform height, with the wheel 10 compacting the joint between the strip laid and that which is being laid.

The scratcher element 7 8, as will best be seen in FIG. 2, is adjustable vertically by a screw threaded element 82 which is threadably mounted in screw threaded sleeve 83 secured on the frame 8, which screw threaded element is operable by means of handle 84. Guide rods 86 are provided on scratcher element 78, which guide rods 86 are guided within sleeves 88, which are mounted on the rear end of frame 8, so upon movement of the scratcher element by means of handle 84, the scratcher 78 is adjusted to the desired position.

The screed :or compacting element 62 has pairs of upstanding lugs 90 secured thereto at spaced intervals throughout the length thereof. A roller 92 is journaled between each pair of lugs for turning movement therein, which rollers are in rolling engagement with the rear face of the adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56, so that the adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56 may be supported against bending moments, and yet the adjustable, transverse strike-oft plate 56 and the screed or compacting element 62 may be readily adjusted relative to each other by means of the respective adjustment screws.

The dump truck 1 carries a conventional power lift arrangement for moving the dump body from one position to another position. However, since it is desirable .to move the paving machine from one position to another, frequently, this is accomplished by connecting chains 94, by means of hooks 96, over the top edge of the dump body of the dump truck 1, and with the chains 94 connected to apcrtured lugs 98, which are connected in rigid relation with respect to frame 8 of the paving machine, and with the dump truck lowered from the position, as shown in FIG. 6 to that shown in FIG. 3, and with the greater portion of the weight of the machine being rearward of apertured lugs 98, the draw bars 16 of the paving machine will be urged upward against axle 4 of the truck. Then, by raising side shield members 100 from the position indicated in dashed outline in FIG. 3 to the position indicated in full outline therein, and with the chains 102 attached to the side shields 100 at one end and with the other ends thereof connected in coupled relation with lug 104 on hopper 36, the machine will be lifted clear of the ground. By retracting plunger of hydraulic jack 42, the cable '30 will be loosened, which will permit the weight 26 to move beams 20 downward, as shown in FIG. 3, which will move the wheels 12 and axle '22 into elevated position, .as shown in FIG. 3.

With the paving machine in elevated position, as shown in FIG. 3, the truck may be backed to place the machine in side-by-sid-e relation with the previously laid strip of paving, the paving machine may then be lowered into ground engaging position, as shown in FIG. 6, and with the jack 42 adjusted so that the draw bars 16 will engage the lower side of axle 4,'the paving machine is ready to be moved along the terrain to lay successive rows or strips of asphalt aggregate compound 49, or such other material as is adapted to be passed through the machine in the manner as set out above.

Each of the side shields has a runner 101 thereon, so as to readily move along the surface of the terrain being coated with .an asphalt aggregate compound or the like. The shields 100 are retained in sliding relation with respect to frame 8 by forwardly extending angle members 106. The forward end of each shield 100 is coupled to the frame 8 by a pin 108, which pins pass downward through the respective sleeves which are mounted on the frame 8 and into the respective sleeves 112 (FIG. 6) mounted on the inner side of the respective shields 100. In this manner the shields 100 may be used to retain the asphalt aggregate compound 49, or other material, in a well defined strip, when successive strips of the compound are being laid. However, in some instances, it is desirable for the asphalt aggregate compound to spread to a greater width than that defined by the shields 100, in which event, the pins 108 are removed, which allows the removal of the shields 100 from the machine, which will allow the asphalt aggregate compound to spread outward from the side of the machine from which the shield has been removed, so as to allow the feathering of the edges of the asphalt compound, which may be compacted by hand or by roller or in any desired, effectivemanner.

While the paving machine is so constructed that the upturned projections -18 will pass below axle 4 of the dump truck '1, which has wheels of the usual height, it may be desirable to use the machine on dump trucks having larger wheels, such as Wheels 2a, in which case, the axle 4a is at a higher elevation than the axle 4. ln this case, tubular extension members 18a are telescoped over the projections 18 on the respective draw bars '16, so as to :give the added height to the projection, so that the tubular extension members 18a will engage the forward side of axle 4a to enable the paving machine to be moved along the terrain by the truck having the larger wheels, therefore the higher axle, as shown in FIGS. 3, 4, and 6. A rack 114 is provided on frame 8 to receive the tubular extension members 18a when these members are not in use. A further rack 116 is provided on frame 8 to receive jack handle 44, when this handle is not in use. While the machine has been described somewhat specifically for the spreading and compacting of an asphalt aggregate compound, it is to be understood that this has been done for purposes of illustration, and that other types of terrain coating surfacing material, which are adapted to pass through or forward of the hopper may be used and smoothed and compacted onto the surface by adjustable, transverse strike-off plate 56 and screed or compacting element 62, which use is considered to be within the scope and inventive concept of the present machine. It has been found that the machine is adaptable for sprea ing sub-surfacing material, prior to the spreading f the final surface coating of asphalt aggregate compound or a cementitious material if it is adapted to pass through the machine and to be processed thereby.

The discharge chute extends downward from the lower end of the hopper to a spaced distance above the terrain, thereby enabling the operator to watch the distribution of the material passing therethrough, which hop-per and chute are of such size that either hot or cold material may be readily fed therethrough, but, if any foreign object is passed into the hopper which will not pass out through the chute, the operator of the machine will at once inform the driver of the truck, so as to insure even spreading of the surfacing material.

1 Second form of the invention With more detailed reference to the drawings of the second form of invention, the numeral 201 designates generally the ground line over which the machine is to be towed and over which paving material is to be spread, by the dump truck towing the paving machine. The dum truck is designated generally by the numeral 202, which dump truck has a body portion 204 which receives a load of aggregate, such as asphalt or the like therein. The body 204 is pivoted, as indicated at 206, on the rear end of frame 208 and has an end gate 210 pivotally mounted, as indicated at 212, to close the end of dump body 204 when the paving material is being hauled to the machine. The truck has an axle 214 with at least one wheel 216 on each end thereof. A spring 218 is interposed between axle 214 and frame 208 in the conventional manner.

The paving machine is designated generally by the numeral 220, which machine has a frame 222 of substantially rectangular form, which frame has downwardly extending members 224 near one end thereof, one on each side of said frame 222, which members 224 are mounted to form mounting brackets. A roller 226 is positioned between the mounting brackets 224 and has a shaft 228 which passes therethrough and through a bearing 230 positioned on each of the mounting brackets 224, so as to journal the roller 226 about the axis of shaft 228. The roller 226 forms a support for one end of the machine, while paving material 231, such as asphalt aggregate compound is being applied.

The frame 222 of the paving machine has spaced apart, forwardly extending members 232 secured thereto to form a forward extension of the frame 222. The forwardly extending members 232 are down-turned at an angle, as

indicated at 234, which downturned portions of the members 232 each has a forwardly extending rod or draw bar 236 secured thereto a spaced distance downward from the upper portion thereof. The forwardly extending bars 236 are up-turned, as indicated at 238 for engagement with the forward side of the rear axle 214 of the dump truck 202, as will be brought out more in detail hereinafter.

A transverse member 240 extends between the forward- 1y extending members 232, which transverse member has downwardly extending, apertured lugs 242 secured thereon. A wheel supporting, apertured beam is pivotally mounted between lugs 242 by a pivot pin 246 which passes through the apertured lugs 242 and through the apertures of the beams 244. The respective forward ends of the beams 244 are apertured to receive an axle shaft 248 therethrough, on which axle shaft 248 wheels 250 are mounted for rotation about the axis thereof. The rear end of the beams 244 has a counterweight 252 secured therebetween to off-set the weight of the wheels 250, as will be more fully brought out hereinafter. When the machine is depositing material on the strip of terrain 201, the wheel 250 at the front end of the machine rides directly upon the terrain before any paving or surfacing material is deposited thereon, as shown in FIG. 12. On the other hand, the roller 226 at the rear of the machine rides upon and compacts the paving or surfacing material 231, as is also shown in FIG. 12.

The counterweight 252 extends between beams 244, as will best be seen in FIG. 12, and has an eye .254 secured on the upper side thereof, to which eye a cable 256 is attached to extend therefrom and over sheave pulley 258, mounted on the forward side of cross beam 259 of frame 222, and through a tubular member 260 and over a sheave pulley 262, mounted on the plunger 263 of hydraulic jack 264, mounted on cross bar 266 of frame 222, with the end of the cable being anchored to the cross bar 266.

Upon outward movement of plunger 263 of hydraulic jack 264, by manipulation of jack handle 268, the sheave pulley 262 will move outward, which will cause cable 256, which is attached to beams 244, to move the rear ends of the beams 244 upward to cause pivotal action of the beams about pivot pin 246, which will move the forward end of the beams 244 carrying wheels 250 downward which will cause the forward end of frame extension members 232 and forwardly extending rods 236 to move upward beneath axle 214 of truck 202 to enable the towing of the paving machine over the terrain to perform a spreading and paving action, or to enable the paving machine to be lifted bodily for movement from place to place, as will be more fully brought out hereinafter.

An open top hopper, designated generally by the numeral 270, is mounted on the frame 222. The open top hopper preferably has the sides thereof diverging upwardly and outwardly, with the wall of the forward side of the hopper being notched, as indicated at 271, to receive the rear end portion of the truck frame thereinto. The upwardly and outwardly diverging sides of the hopper direct asphalt aggregate paving material or the like downward into the chute portion 272 of the hopper 270. The chute portion 272, as will best be seen in FIGS. 9 and 12, is closed at the lower end thereof by a pivoted, swinging door or valve 274, the purpose of which is to regulate the discharge of the asphalt aggregate compound or the like from the chute 272. The swinging door or valve 274 may be closed, as indicated in full outline in FIGS. 9 and 13, or it may be opened to any degree, up to the extent indicated in full outline in FIG. 12 or in dashed outline in FIG. 13, by the manipulation of a regulating lever 276 which is secured to transverse shaft 278, which shaft is journaled within frame 222. A pair of levers 280 is secured to the shaft 278, one near each end thereof, to each of which levers a rod 282 is pivotally connected. The rods 282 extend forward and pivotally connect to an end of lever 284, which lever 284 is pivotally mounted, by pivot pin 286, on frame 222 to actuate door or valve 274 by movement of linkage 288, which linkage 288 is pivotally connected to the lower end of lever 284 by means of a pivot pin and to the ends of the door 274 by means of the pivot bolts 290, one on each end of the door 274. A rack 292 is pivotally mounted on lever 276 for engagement with a lug or keeper 294 on cross member 266 so as to hold the lever 276 in any desired set position to enable the feeding of the asphalt aggregate compound downward and out of the lower end of the chute 272.

A spreader blade or trowel 296 is connected to cross member 298 of frame 222, by hinge 300 so as to spread the asphalt aggregate smoothly across the entire width of the machine as it is being towed over the terrain. The spreader blade 296 has a free trailing edge 302 at a slightly more flattened angle than the upper portion thereof so as to discharge the material to a uniform thickness with respect to the terrain over which the machine is operating. An angle bar 304 extends longitudinally of spreader blade 296 and has an apertured lug on the upper end thereof through which lug a pivot bolt 306 passes and through clevis 308 which is adjustably mounted 9 on the lower end of screw rod 310. The rod 310 threadably engages a threaded sleeve 312 which sleeve is secured to frame 222, so upon rotation of rod 310 by handle 314 on the upper end thereof, the blade 296 is raised or lowered. One of the rods 310 is positioned on each side of the machine so as to enable adjustment of each end of the blade 296.

A material thickness indicator rod 316 is pivotally mounted to lug 318 near the trailing edge 302 of spreader blade 296. The indicator rod 316 extends upward through a slot 320 in frame 222 and has indicia thereon, which indicia is readable along the top edge of pointer 322, FIG. 10, thereby enabling the determination of the distance between the lower edge 302 of the blade 296 and the face of the terrain at all times, without measurements having to be taken.

The paving machine has fenders or side shields 324, one on each side thereof, as indicated in dashed outline in FIG. 9 and in full outline in FIGS. 10, 12 and 14, which fenders 324 are maintained against outward movement by a guide bracket 321 secured to each side of frame 222 and by stay rods 325, one of which stay rods pass through each fender 324, as indicated in FIGS. 10, 12 and 14. The stay rod is threaded at each end and each end thereof has two nuts thereon so as to secure each fender against lateral movement with respect to frame 222. The fenders or shields 324 confine the aggregate within the width of the machine. Each of the fenders 324 has a runner 326 on the lower side thereof, which runners are formed of in-turned angle members, as will best be seen in FIGS. 11 and 14. The blade 296 has a screw threaded boss 328 on each end thereof, which bosses extend substantially vertically therethrough and are threadably engaged by jack screws 330, which jack screws 330 are rounded at the lower ends thereof, as indicated at 332, for engagement with the upper surface of the flange of angle members 326, as will best be seen in FIGS. 11 and 14. The upper end of each jack screw 330 extends upward through an elongated slot 320 in frame 222, and each has a hand wheel 334 on the upper end thereof to enable the turning of the respective jack screws 330 to position blade 296 to define the desired thickness between the lower edge of strike-off plate or spreader blade 296 and the terrain on which the runner angle members seat.

Each fender or shield 324 has a sleeve 337 secured thereto by a pivot bolt 335 at the forward end thereof, to connect with the forward end of frame 222 by means of a bar 336 which passes through the respective sleeves 338, one on each side of the forward end of the frame 222. This enables the fenders 324 to float or rise and fall in sliding relation on bar 336 to a limited degree, however, chains 340 are secured to the outer side of each fender 324 and are engageable with the respective slotted lugs 342 mounted on the frame adjacent the sides of the hopper 270 to hold the fenders in raised position when it is desired to transport the machine from place to place. The chains 340 limit the downward movement of the fenders 324 relative to frame 222, thereby enabling the machine to be picked up without the fenders moving downward below the bottom of the machine.

The frame 222 has an ear 344 on each side thereof, which ears extend upward therefrom and through each end of the hopper 270. The upper ends of the respective ears are apertured and a chain 346 is secured in each ear. Each chain 346 has a hook 348 thereon for engagement with the upper edges of the body 204 of the truck 202 to enable the lifting of the paving machine clear of the ground for transportation from place to place by the truck.

A lug 350 is secured on each side of the frame 222 and these lugs extend upward through each end of the hopper 270 and each of the lugs has an out-turned hook 352 thereon to receive a chain therein for lifting the machineor for loading the machine onto a truck or the like. When it is desired to raise the rear end of the paving machine to a higher elevation, as for loading, a chain is connected directly to the respective lugs 350, as pointed out above.

The hopper 270 has a liquid supply tank 356 mounted on the rear thereof, into which tank a liquid, such as water, Diesel oil, or the like, may be introduced through fill cap 358. A conduit leads from the liquid supply tank 356 to a perforate spreader pipe 364. The conduit 360 has a control valve 362 therein so as to control the flow of liquid to the perforate spreader pipe 364 which is mounted on the frame 222 directly above the rolller 226. The spreader pipe 364 has the perforations 366 therein at spaced intervals throughout the length thereof to direct the liquid from pipe 360 onto roller 226. An elongated pad 368, preferably of absorbent material, is positioned on the upper side of roller 226 in position to receive liquid discharged from the perforations 366 in pipe 364. The pad 368 is resiliently held in place by a series of springs 370 which are secured to the frame 222 at one end and to the scraper blade 372 at the other end. The scraper blade 372 is pivotally mounted, on one side, to frame 222 by pin 374, and the other side thereof is sharpened so the edge will fit in cutting relation with the cylindrical surface or roller 226. Further springs 373, one on each end of blade 372, interconnect the scraper blade 372 with the frame 222 through downwardly extending lugs 224.

The frame 222 has a floor plate 376 a portion of which is mounted on the upper surface thereof forwardly of the hopper 270 and a portion of which is mounted on the upper surface from the frame 222 extends rearwardly of the hopper 270 to provide space on which an operator may stand for operation and/ or inspection of the machine.

Operation of the second form of the invention With the paving machine 220 positioned immediately rearward of a dump truck 202, and with the up-turned projections 230 of bars 236 lying in a plane parallel to and forward of the axis of axle 214, the jack handle 26% of jack 264 is operated to move the plunger 263 of jack 264 outward. The jack plunger 263 has a sheave 262 mounted thereon and with one end of the cable 256 anchored to frame 222, the cable will be tightened to cause the rear end of beams 244 to be raised, which will cause a relative movement of the lower side of wheels 250 and the upper side of outwardly projecting bars 236 away from each other. This will cause the bars 236 to move into contact relation with the lower side of axle 214 of truck 202, and upon continued actuation of jack handle 268, additional pressure will be put on wheels 250 and a portion of the truck weight will be lifted to cause more weight to be transferred to compacting roller 226.

The upstanding portions 238 of bars 236 will enable the paving machine 220 to be pulled over the terrain. Upon raising the dump body 204 of truck 202 to the position as indicated in dashed outline in FIG. 12, the tail gate 210 will swing against the rear wall of hopper 270, with the aggregate being dumped from the dump truck body 204 being directed into hopper 270, and with the door or valve 274 on the lower end of chute 272, on the lower end of the hopper, open, as indicated in dashed outline in FIG. 13, the asphalt aggregate compound will pass outward through the lower end of chute 272 as the paving machine moves forward. The asphalt aggregate compound will become banked against the forward side of the spreader blade 296 and with the trailing edge 302 of strike-off plate or troweling blade 296 spaced the desired distance above the terrain by means of the jack screw 330 engaging the upper face of runner 326, a basis will be formed for maintaining the runner firmly against the surface of the terrain, with the trailing edge 302 of the blade 296 being spaced the desired distance upward from the surface of the terrain 201 to control the uncompacted asphalt aggregate compound.

With the dump truck 202 in this position, and with the machine thus adjusted, the asphalt aggregate compound feeds outward between the lower edge 302 of blade 296 and the terrain 201, as the truck moves forward. The asphalt feeds outward beneath trailing edge 392 of blade 296, as indicated at 231, which strip of asphalt aggregate compound then receives the roller 226 thereon to compact the asphalt aggregate compound into a smooth linear strip, the width of which is defined by the spacing of fenders 324. Successive strips of asphalt aggregate compound may be laid in side by side relation to obtain the desired width of paving.

In view of the fact that the asphalt aggregate compound or other aggregates will, under certain conditions, stick to the roller 226, a liquid distribution pipe 364 is mounted directly above the roller 226, which pipe is perforated, as indicated at 366, so as to direct liquid onto the upper surface of roller 226 and onto the absorbent pad 368, which pad extends the length of the roller 226, and with the roller 226 rolling in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIG. 15, the roller will be coated with liquid from pipe 364, and as it comes in contact with the strip of asphalt, as indicated at 231, will normally be prevented from sticking to the asphalt aggregate compound or the like. Should the asphalt aggregate compound or the like adhere to the surface of the roller 226, the scraper blade 372 is positioned on the frame 222 in position to engage the cylindrical portion of the roller 226, under the tension of springs 370, to scrape the paving material from the roller.

Once the trailing edge 302 of blade 396 is adjusted with respect to the terrain 201, the blade 372 will be maintained in this relation until it is changed by the adjustment of the screw threaded rods 310 and jack screws 330.

The amount of material discharged from the lower end of the chute 272 is controlled by the door or valve 274, which door or valve may be opened the desired degree, or it may be closed completely, as indicated in full outline in FIGS. 9 and 13, when it is desired to move the machine from place to place.

It is to be pointed out that the machine is relatively light in weight, and is, therefore, easy to transport from place to place, however, the rods or draw bars 236 are jacked upward against the lower side of axle 214 until some of the weight of the truck is supported by the paving machine. The pressure on the roller 226 is proportionate to the weight on the paving machine, the weight of the material in the hopper, plusa portion of the weight of the truck and the material therein, as indicated by the weight of the load lifted by jack 264 in urging wheels 250 downward and drawbars 236 upward.

In laying strips of asphalt aggregate compound pavement, the dump truck 202 may be backed into place so the draw bars 236 and the upwardly extending projections 238 may be readily engaged on axle 214 of the truck, then the dump body 204 of the truck is raised, as indicated in dashed outline in FIG. 12, so as to dump the asphalt aggregate compound into the hopper of the paving machine 220 as the truck 202 and the paving machine move along the surface to be paved. However, when the asphalt aggregate compound becomes exhausted from the dump body 204 of the truck, the pressure on the plunger 263 of jack 264 may be released, which will lower the upstanding projections 238 on draw bars 236 to a point below the lowermost point of axle 214, whereupon, the truck can be driven away to be reloaded, and another truck, filled with paving material may be backed into position so that, upon actuation of jack handle 268 to move plunger 263 outward, the cable 256 will be tightened to move the draw bars 236 into contact, lifting relation with respect to axle 214, whereupon, successive loads of paving material may be dumped into hopper 270 to be rolled and spread on the surface to be paved, as set out above.

The present machine is particularly adaptable for work in close places, as set forth in the first mentioned form of invention. The paving machine 220 may be picked up by the truck, while the paving machine is filled with aggregate, by engaging hooks 248 with the top edge of body 204 and utilizing the downward movement of the truck body from the position shown in dashed outline in FIG. 12, to the normal position of the truck for traveling. With the paving machine thus lifted clear of the terrain, the truck 202 may be backed, or otherwise maneuvered into close places to put the paving machine in desired locations for simultaneously dispensing, applying, spreading and rolling the paving material onto the surface of the terrain in a continuous strip as the truck passes over the terrain.

Having thus clearly shown and described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A machine for spreading and compacting surfacing material onto a strip of terrain, which machine is adapted to be towed by a dump truck, which machine comprises;

(a) a wheeled frame,

(b) a transverse hopper mounted on said wheeled frame which hopper has a discharge opening formed in the lower end thereof,

(1) said opening in said hopper being of the width of the strip of terrain to be surfaced,

(c) a chute attached to the lower end of said hopper and being of a width of the opening in the lower end thereof,

(1) said chute leading from the lower end of said hopper to a point a spaced distance above the terrain to direct surfacing material from the hopper onto the strip of terrain to be surfaced,

(d) a transversely arranged plate mounted on said frame rearwardly of said hopper and extending downward to a spaced distance above the terrain to form a strike-off means to strike off surfacing material discharge from said chute to a predetermined thickness,

(e) a single roller compacting means mounted on said wheeled frame transversely thereof rearwardly of said strike-off means, which roller is in compacting contact with the surfacing material discharged onto said strip of terrain and being at least the width of said strip of surfacing material,

(f) a beam pivotally mounted on said frame near the forward end thereof,

(g) a pair of wheels of said wheeled frame being mounted on the forward end of said pivoted beam for rotation about an axis to support said wheeled frame for movement over the terrain,

(h) cable means connected to the rear end portion of said pivoted beam,

(i) jack means positioned intermediate said frame and said cable to exert a pulling action on said cable when said jack is moved in one direction to urge said wheels into contact relation with the terrain, and

(j) forwardly and upwardly extending bar portions secured to the forward end of said frame and being adapted to engage the lower and forward side of an axle of a towing vehicle to form a draw bar, and to support at least a portion of the weight of the towing vehicle thereon while the machine is moved over the terrain to perform a surfacing and compacting operation.

2. A machine for spreading and compacting surfacing material on a strip of terrain which includes a frame having front and rear ends, means at said front end of said frame for attaching the same to a vehicle, sue-h as a dump truck, so as to be towed thereby, wheel means centrally located at said front end of said frame for supporting that end of the strip of terrain before any surfacing material has been deposited thereon, a hopper for holding surfacing material mounted on said frame to the rear of said wheel means, a chute attached to the lower end of said hopper for conveying surfacing material from said hopper to a point a spaced distance above the strip of terrain, a transversely disposed plate movably mounted on said frame to the rear of said hopper and said chute, means connected between said frame and said plate for adjusting the vertical position of said plate on said frame so as to cause said plate to strike 01f surfacing material discharged from said chute to a predetermined thickness on the terrain, compacting means mounted on said frame transversely thereof and to the rear of said plate, whereby said compacting means supports said rear end of said frame on the surfacing material deposited upon the strip of terrain through said chute after said plate has struck off the material to the predetermined thickness, side fend ers vertically movable mounted on said frame at opposite sides of said plate, said side fenders including lateral projection means, adjustable stop means vertically adjustably carried by said plate and adapted to engage said lateral projection means for limiting vertical movement of said side fenders relative to said plate, said side fenders serving to restrain lateral movement of the surfacing material and measuring means between said plate and said side fenders to indicate the relative orientation of said plate and said side fenders to aid the operator of the machine in correctly vertically adjusting said plate.

3. A machine adapted to be attached to a vehicle, such as a dump truck, for spreading and compacting surfacing material on a strip of terrain, said machine including a frame having front and rear ends, rigid hook means on said front end of said frame adapted to attach said frame to an underside of the vehicle for towing thereby, Wheel means rotatably and vertically adjustably mounted on said front end adjacent the longitudinal center line of said frame, adjacent said rigid hook means, and subjacent the vehicle for supporting said front end on the strip of terrain, said wheel means being spaced inwardly from the sides of said frame, hopper means for holding surfacing material, said hopper means mounted on said frame rearwardly of said rigid hook means, a transversely disposed plate movably mounted on said frame rearwardly of said hopper means, adjusting means for vertically adjusting said plate relative to said frame, transversely disposed compacting means mounted on said frame rearwardly of said plate, and jack means mounted on said frame, said jack means operatively connected to said Wheel means to raise and lower said Wheel means to urge said rigid hook means into pressure engagement with the underside of the vehicle whereby a portion of the weight of the vehicle will he transferred to the forward end of the frame.

4. A machine according to claim 3 wherein a bar is connected an end of said transversely disposed plate and extends upwardly therefrom, indicia on at least one face of said bar, side fenders at each side of said hopper means having runners along their lower edge adapted to ride on the surface of the terrain, a second bar mounted on said fenders and extending upwardly in side-by-side relation to a side of said bar having indicia thereon, the upper surface of said second bar forming a reading gauge relative to said indicia to the lower edge of said plate and the face of the terrain.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,237,406 8/17 Stoner 94-50 2,092,458 9/ 37 Krout 94 -44 2,109,020 2/38 Abernathy 94-44 2,197,183 4/40 Keller 94-50 2,197,395 4/40 Keller 94-50 2,197,878 4/40 Robinson 94-44 2,215,455 9/40 Abernathy 94-44 2,351,593 6/44 Barber 94-46 2,479,800 8/49 Williams 94-44 2,568,445 9/51 Grattan 280-503 2,663,231 12/53 Wood 94-46 2,762,276 9/56 Mauch 94-44 2,842,036 7/58 Overm an 94-46 2,847,917 8/59 Heer 94-46 2,874,621 2/ 59 Mentes 94-46 2,914,995 12/59 Odell 94-46 2,954,241 9/ 60 Warren 94-44 X CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

JACOB L. NAQKENQFF, Examiner,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3318208 *Jul 8, 1965May 9, 1967J A Terteling & Sons IncPaving machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification404/110, 280/460.1, 280/503
International ClassificationE01C19/00, E01C19/48, E01C19/43, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/43, E01C19/4826, E01C19/4873
European ClassificationE01C19/48B4, E01C19/48D3, E01C19/43