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Publication numberUS3213830 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1965
Filing dateFeb 19, 1964
Priority dateFeb 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3213830 A, US 3213830A, US-A-3213830, US3213830 A, US3213830A
InventorsJohn K Wiesemann
Original AssigneeJohn K Wiesemann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Neck oilers for cattle and the like
US 3213830 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 26, 1965 J. K. WIESEMANN NECK OILERS FOR CATTLE AND THE LIKE Filed Feb. 1 1964 eels E291.

United States Patent I 3,213,830 NECK OILERS FOR CATTLE AND THE LIKE John K. Wiesemann, R.F.D., East Brownfield, Maine Filed Feb. 19, 1964, Ser. No. 345,980 6 Claims. (Cl. 119-106) The present invention relates to neck oilers for cattle to ensure the continuous application of an insecticide to their necks.

While cattle are relatively free of insects during winter months, it is commonly noted that, even in the coldest weather, cattle will be found to have insects in neck areas,

typically in the zone at the base of the throat. As a consequence, insecticides must be applied to infested areas and even though the applications take but a short time for each animal, they must be repeated so that a considerable time factor is involved in such treatments, the factor being in proportion to the size of the herd.

The principal objective of the present invention is to enable infested neck areas to be treated efficiently and economically. This objective is attained by providing a neck oiler in the form of an elongated, flexible envelope, preferably of a clear plastic, having means for detachably interconnecting the ends thereof about the neck of the animal. The inner face of the envelope has a plurality of ports spaced lengthwise thereof. A wick member is threaded through the ports and is dimensioned to close them and provides internal portions exposed to the oil in the envelope and external portions exposed for engagement with the neck of the animal.

In the accompanying drawings, there is shown an illustrative embodiment of the invention illustrating these and other of its objectives and novel features and advantages.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a neck oiler in accordance with the invention,

FIGURE 2 is a section on an increased scale, taken approximately along the indicated lines 22 of FIG- URE 1,

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal section showing the threaded wick member,

FIGURE 4 is a section taken approximately along the indicated lines 4-4 of FIGURE 1, and

FIGURE 5 is an elevation of the oiler showing the inner face thereof.

A neck oiler in accordance with the invention is herein discussed with particular reference to the embodiment thereof shown in the drawings and particularly adapted for use with dairy herds.

The neck oiler shown in the drawings consists of an elongated, flexible envelope generally indicated at which is preferably formed from a transparent plastic stock. It is preferred that the envelope 10 be so formed as to have a flat inner face 11 and a somewhat convex outer face 12. The envelope 10 is sealed adjacent one end to provide an extension 13 folded about the cross bar 14 of a buckle 15 and sealed to itself as at 16. The envelope 10 is sealed adjacent its outer end to provide a tongue 17 provided with a series of perforations 18. By these or equivalent means, the envelope 10 may be secured about the neck of a cow and the envelope may carry a ring 19 to which is attached a tag 20 bearing data relative to that cow.

The inner face 11 of the envelope 10 has two series of apertures 21, the series both extending lengthwise of the envelope 10. A generally indicated wick-like member 22, dimensioned to close the apertures 21, is threaded lengthwise of the envelope through one series of apertures 21 and is returned by threading it through the other series with the ends of the member 22 both being exposed at the same end of the envelope 10 to which they are clamped by the generally indicated clamp 23. The clamp 23 is shown as consisting of a transverse bar 24 provided with a threaded stem 25 extending through the tongue end of the envelope 10 to provide the seal therefor when the bar 26 is clamped thereagainst by the nut 27, the ends ofthe wick member 22 also being caught between the envelope 10 and the clamping bars. By this arrangement, the envelope 10 may be readily refilled and the wick member 22 removed and replaced.

The wick member '22 provides inner portions 22A exposed to the liquid within the envelope 10, typically an oil containing an insecticide visible through the transparent walls of the envelope so that it can readily be determined whether the oilers need attention to provide the proper protection for the cattle. The wick member 22 provides external portions 22B for engagement with the neck of the cow.

It will be appreciated that the envelope 10 is not applied as a tight collar. In practice, as the cow moves, the envelope moves so that the oil carried by the external portions is applied over a wide zone in the neck area as will be obvious when one considers the movement of a cow while held by stanchions while at her stall.

I claim:

1. A neck oiler for a herd of cattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, means to detachably interconnect the ends thereof about the neck of the animal, the inner face of said envelope having a plurality of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through and closing said ports with portions interiorly of the envelope exposed to the oil therein and portions exteriorly thereof exposed for engagement with the neck.

2. A neck oiler for a head of cattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, at least the outer face of said envelope being transparent, means to detachably interconnect the ends thereof about the neck of the animal, the inner face of said envelope having a plurality of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through and closing said ports with portions interiorly of the envelope exposed to the oil therein and portions exteriorly thereof exposed for engagement with the neck.

3. A neck oiler for a herd of cattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, means to detachably connect the ends thereof about the neck of the animal, the inner face of said envelope having two parallel series of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through and closing the ports of both series with its ends exposed, portions of said wick member interiorly of said envelope being exposed to the oil therein and portions thereof exteriorly of said envelope being exposed for engagement with the neck, and means cinching the ends of said member.

4. A neck oiler for a herd of cattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, means to detachably connect the ends thereof about the neck of the animal, the inner face of said envelope having two parallel series of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through and closing the ports of both series with its ends exposed through corresponding ports, one at the end of each series, portions of said wick member interiorly of said envelope being exposed to the oil therein and portions thereof exteriorly of said envelope being exposed for engagement with the neck, and means cinching the ends of said member.

5. A neck oiler for a herd ofcattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, means to detachably connect the ends thereof about the neck of the animal, the inner face of said envelope having two parallel series of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through and closing the ports of both series with its ends exposed, portions of said Wick member interiorly of said envelope being exposed to the oil therein and portions thereof exteriorly of said envelope being exposed for engagement with the neck, and means cinching the ends of said member, said means comprising a detachably clamp. I

6. A neck oiler for a herd of cattle, said oiler comprising an elongated, flexible envelope constituting a reservoir for an oil containing an insecticide, said envelope having an open end, a detachable clamp closing said end, means to detachably connect the ends of said envelope about the neck of the animal, the inner face of saidenvelope having a plurality of ports spaced lengthwise thereof, and a wick member threaded through the ports with its ends held by said clamp, said wick member thus having portions interiorly of said envelope and exposed to the oil therein and portions exteriorly of the envelope for engagement with the neck.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,127,249 2/5 Hughes 119106 1,710,314 4/29 Kyle 119 157 2,205,711 6/40 Banks 119-106 2,401,253 5/46 Lamb 119--106 3,135,241 6/64 Mann 119 157 SAMUEL KOREN, Primary Examiner.

ADRICH F. MEDBERY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1127249 *Apr 3, 1914Feb 2, 1915Paschal HughesDog-collar.
US1710314 *Jun 22, 1927Apr 23, 1929Kyle Joseph MDevice for applying liquids to animals
US2205711 *May 6, 1939Jun 25, 1940Frank K BanksInsecticide collar for animals
US2401253 *Apr 5, 1944May 28, 1946Jr Thomas A LambFlea-guard dog collar
US3135241 *Mar 12, 1962Jun 2, 1964Mann Frederick WAutomatic insecticide applicator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3803801 *Oct 16, 1972Apr 16, 1974Barth WInsect control device
US4023532 *Apr 22, 1976May 17, 1977Roy GoodwinFace fly device
US4036229 *Oct 24, 1975Jul 19, 1977Rosolino MarinelloApparatus for assisting the treatment of wounds or inflammations internal to the human body
US4355599 *May 12, 1981Oct 26, 1982Fickes Scott AFlea collar kit
US4506630 *Sep 30, 1982Mar 26, 1985Hair Jakie AApparatus for sustained dispensation of a chemical agent exteriorally of an animal
US4901674 *Jul 11, 1988Feb 20, 1990S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Multi-sectional powder emitting animal collar and method of making
US4930451 *Jul 29, 1988Jun 5, 1990The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of AgricultureDevice for sustained-release of a chemical onto an animal and method of using the device
US6101981 *Sep 8, 1998Aug 15, 2000Friend; RoxanePet collar
US6748903 *May 19, 2003Jun 15, 2004Price, Iii William ClintonFilamented animal collar and method of manufacture
US7185613 *Mar 31, 2005Mar 6, 2007Christina ArvanitisFashion accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification119/654, D02/635, 119/660, 119/860
International ClassificationA01K13/00, A01K27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01K27/007, A01K13/003
European ClassificationA01K27/00F, A01K13/00D