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Publication numberUS3214902 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateMay 28, 1964
Priority dateMay 28, 1964
Publication numberUS 3214902 A, US 3214902A, US-A-3214902, US3214902 A, US3214902A
InventorsMaring Walter D
Original AssigneeMaring Walter D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhaust treating device
US 3214902 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 2, 1965 w. D. MARING EXHAUST TREATING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 28, 1964 INVENTOR WALTER 0. MAQING Nov. 2, 1965 w. D. MARING EXHAUST TREATING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 28, 1964 INVENTOR WALTER D. MAWNG United States Patent l 3,214,902 EXHAUST TREATING DEVICE Walter D. Maring, Shelby, Ind. Filed D'Iay 28, 1964, Ser. No. 370,940 11 Claims. (Cl. 60-30) The invention relates to improvements in exhaust treating devices or mufflers for internal combustion engines. More particularly, the invention relates to a muffler for an internal combustion engine which mutfler embodies novel means to eliminate or greatly reduce the amount of carbon monoxide passing therefrom. The device includes means for silencing the noise of exhaust gases and further embodies novel means to admit atmospheric air into the interior of the device so that exhaust gases therein can be reburned by elements incorporated into its construction.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an exhaust treating device with novel means to burn the hydrocarbons in exhaust gases flowing therethrough.

Another object is to provide a device of the character described with fluid filtering means effective to change the exhaust gases into a highly volatile vapor.

Another object is to provide novel means to change the chemical properties of exhaust gases.

Another object is to provide a device of the character referred to which is not expensive to manufacture or use, is very etficient in its use and is easy to install on existing engines.

Other objects and the advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the exhaust treating device, showing parts of the outside casing broken away.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the device, showing parts of the casing broken away.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view, taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view, taken on line 4 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a transverse sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the atmospheric air inlet, taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 1.

Referring to the exemplary disclosure in the accompanying drawings, the exhaust treating device includes an outer shell 11, generally oval in section, having end walls 12 and 12:: closing the ends thereof. Spaced from said end walls and spaced apart are three partitions 13, 14 and 15. A tubular conduit 16 extends inwardly through the shell from one end wall 12a and it is connected in flow communication with an inlet fitting 17 having connection with the exhaust pipe 18 of an internal combustion engine. This tubular conduit 16 passes through the partitions and 14 and its inner end opens into an expansion chamber 19 between partitions 13 and 14. A second tubular conduit 21 is arranged within the casing 11, parallel to but spaced from conduit 16, and extends from the partition 15 through partition 14, expansion chamber 19 and partition 13. One end of said conduit 21 is in flow communication with a chamber 22 defined by partition 15 and the related end wall 120; whereas, the other end is in flow communication with an exhaust chamber 23 defined by partition 13 and its related end wall 12.

Atmospheric air is admitted into shell 11 through a tube 24 that extends through end wall 12:: and has, on its outside end, a flared mouth 25 adapted to scoop up air when the engine is in operation. The tube 24 has, at its juncture with the flared mouth 25, a venturi fitting 26 (FIG. 6) provided with a restricted orifice 2.7, the lead end of which is bevelled or rounded, as at 28, to maintain a low level of sound of air passing therethrough.

3,2143% Patented Nov. 2, 1965 The bottom region of shell 11, between partition 13 and end wall 12a is filled with a fluid 29. This fluid preferably comprises a mixture of benzyl benzoate and a high temperature lubricating oil. Such mixture have a boiling point of about 613 F. The upper unfilled region of the shell between partitions 14 and 15 constitutes a combustion chamber. The liquid level can be maintained through a filling opening normally closed by a plug 31 and a spill-out opening normally closed by a plug 32. When required, the liquid, which accumulates waste material and residue, can be withdrawn for replacement by a clean liquid upon removal of a floor plate 33 provided in the bottom side of shell 11.

As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the partitions 14 and 15 are perforated, as at 34, 35, respectively, in their lower or submerged areas only for a purpose to be explained presently.

insofar as the structure has been described, exhaust gases entering conduit 16 flow into expansion chamber 19 and down into the fluid 29 in said chamber. Said gases are drawn, by means described presently, through the apertures 34 in partition 14 and rise in the form of a monoxide gas into the upper region or combustion chamber of the shell where it is mixed with atmospheric air entering tube 24 and becomes highly volatile. Means in the form of a spark element 35 is mounted in the combustion chamber which is adapted to fire at predetermined close intervals through electrical connection with a spark coil (not shown) on the internal combustion engine. Firing of the spark element ignites the highly volatile gas-air mixture thus consuming same and carbonizing solids therein. These burnt gases and solids are drawn back into the liquid 29 in the bottom of the combustion chamber by means to be described presently, where the solids remain to be collected in the form of a sludge 0n the bottom of the shell. The burnt gases however, flow through the liquid and through the aper tures 35' in partition 15 into chamber 22 and out through the conduit 21.

The flow of atmospheric air and gases through the device and the exhaust of burnt gases is accomplished by providing on the outlet end of conduit 21, and in chamber 23, a centrifugal blower 3'7 operated by a motor 38 which operates to direct the gases to and through an exhaust outlet 39.

It should be apparent that the monoxide (CO) content of the gases flowing through exhaust outlet 39 has been converted to carbon dioxide (CO From the foregoing description it will be apparent that I have provided a novel exhaust treating device which is simple in construction and highly etficient in operation.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In an exhaust treating device, a tubular shell closed at its ends and having an exhaust gas inlet and an exhaust outlet, means in said shell to wash exhaust gases entering said shell, means to mix said Washed exhaust gases with atmospheric air within said shell, means in said shell to ignite said gas-air mixture, and means in said shell to wash burnt gases and to convey them to the exhaust outlet.

2. The exhaust treating device recited in claim 1, in which the means to exhaust said burnt gases comprises a blower.

3. In an exhaust treating device, a tubular shell closed at its ends, an inlet for exhaust gases in one end of said shell and an exhaust outlet in the other end of said shell, a conduit through which said gases pass, a chamber into which said gases are discharged from said conduit, a combustion chamber in said shell, means of communication between said chamber and said combustion chamber, a liquid filling a part of said chamber and combustion chamber and covering said means of communication, said gases flowing through said liquid from the chamber into the combustion chamber, an inlet for atmospheric air in said combustion chamber, means to ignite the mixture of gases and atmospheric air in said combustion chamber, and means to convey burnt gases from the combustion chamber to the exhaust outlet.

4. The exhaust treating device recited in claim 3, in which a partition separates the chamber from the combustion chamber and the means of flow communication comprises at least one aperture in said partition.

5. The exhaust treating device recited in claim 3, in which a second conduit is provided in the shell to deliver burnt gases from the combustion chamber to the exhaust outlet.

6. The exhaust treating device recited in claim 3, in which a suction blower is provided to exhaust the burnt gases.

7. In an exhaust treating device, a shell, a combustion chamber in said shell, said combustion chamber containing a liquid, means to discharge exhaust gases through said liquid and into said combustion chamber, means to admit atmospheric air into said combustion chamber, means to ignite the atmospheric air and gas mixture, and means to withdraw burnt gases from the combustion chamber through said liquid and discharge it from the shell.

8. The exhaust treating device recited in claim 7, in which the means to ignite the mixture comprises a spark element.

9. In an exhaust treating device, a shell having end walls, first and second conduits in said shell, means connecting one end of said first conduit to the exhaust of an internal combustion engine, a first partition at one end of said shell defining with one end wall a chamber with which one end of the second conduit communicates, second and third partitions spaced apart and spaced from the other end wall defining separate chambers, a combustion chamber in said shell between the first and second partitions, one of said separate chambers being in flow communication with the other end of the first conduit and the other chamber being in flow communication with the other end of said second conduit, an exhaust outlet leading from said last named chamber, a fluid contained in said combustion chamber, perforations in the first and second partitions submerged in said fluid, means to force exhaust gases flowing through the first conduit to flow through said fluid and into the combustion chamber, means to admit atmospheric air into the 4- combustion chamber above said fluid, and means to ignite the mixture of atmospheric air and gases in said combustion chamber, said force means withdrawing burnt gases through the fluid and into the said second conduit for delivery to the exhaust outlet.

10. In an exhaust treating device, a shell, first and second conduits in said shell, means connecting one end of said first conduit to the exhaust of an internal combustion engine, a first chamber at one end of said shell with which one end of the second conduit communicates, second and third chambers at the other end of said shell, a combustion chamber in said shell between the first and second chambers, said second chamber being in flow communication with the other end of the first conduit and the third chamber being in flow communication with the other end of said second conduit, an exhaust outlet leading from said third chamber, a fluid partially filling said combustion chamber, passageways connecting the first and second chambers with the combustion chamber, said passageway being submerged in said fluid, means to force exhaust gases flowing into the second chamber to flow through said fluid and into the combustion chamber, means to admit atmospheric air into the combustion chamber above said fluid, and means to ignite the mixture of atmospheric air and gases in said combustion chamber, said force means withdrawing the burnt gases through the fluid and into the said second conduit for delivery to the ex haust outlet.

11. The method of changing the chemical properties of exhaust gases, which comprises flowing said gases through a liquid and into a combustion chamber, mixing atmospheric air with said gases in said chamber, igniting said air-gas mixture, and withdrawing the burnt gases through the liquid and exhausting same.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 873,785 12/07 Reichel 30 1,292,283 1/19 Faber. 1,402,814 1/ 22 Wachtel 60-30 1,538,335 5/25 Koehler 6030 1,750,342 3 /30 Bailey. 2,402,087 6/46 Rosales 6030 X 2,686,399 8/54 Stoltz 6030 3,032,968 5/62 Novak et al. 6030 3,036,897 5/62 Uphoif 6030 X SAMUEL LEVINE, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US873785 *Apr 24, 1906Dec 17, 1907Alfred ReichelApparatus for deodorizing the exhaust-gases of motors.
US1292283 *Aug 19, 1918Jan 21, 1919Steve Peter FaberExhaust-muffler.
US1402814 *Sep 23, 1920Jan 10, 1922Wilhelm SchmiddingArrangement for purifying and rendering odorless the exhaust gases of internal-combustion engines and the like
US1538335 *Jun 28, 1923May 19, 1925Anthony J KoehlerMeans for washing gases
US1750342 *Feb 29, 1928Mar 11, 1930Wells S BaileyCarbon-monoxide consumer
US2402087 *Oct 28, 1943Jun 11, 1946Rosales Pedro EnriquezExhaust silencer
US2686399 *Apr 14, 1952Aug 17, 1954Goodman Mfg CoExhaust gas conditioner
US3032968 *Jan 11, 1960May 8, 1962Novak CharlesEngine exhaust gas purifier
US3036897 *Aug 5, 1958May 29, 1962Uphoff Melvin JAnti-smog muffler
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3282047 *Feb 23, 1965Nov 1, 1966Sidney B WertheimerPurifying apparatus to eliminate air pollution from automotive, industrial and commercial exhaust products
US3478495 *Jan 23, 1968Nov 18, 1969Reynaldo M DearyAir pollution filter apparatus
US3642259 *Jul 23, 1969Feb 15, 1972Carl L BowdenAutomobile exhaust filter
US6167700 *Apr 28, 1999Jan 2, 2001Jeff LampertExhaust system for an internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/170, 60/274, 60/297, 60/307, 60/310, 261/126, 261/24, 60/315, 60/303
International ClassificationF01N3/08
Cooperative ClassificationF01N2470/30, F01N3/08
European ClassificationF01N3/08