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Publication numberUS3215333 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateOct 22, 1962
Priority dateOct 22, 1962
Publication numberUS 3215333 A, US 3215333A, US-A-3215333, US3215333 A, US3215333A
InventorsStelzer James S
Original AssigneeEckrich Peter & Sons
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging member
US 3215333 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 2, 1965 J. s. STELZER 3,215,333

PACKAGING MEMBER Filed 001;. 22, 1962 s Sheets-Sheet 1 /0 F/G. 4 45 INVENTOR.

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Filed Oct. 22, 1962 PACKAGING MEMBER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 2, 1965 J. s. STELZER 3,215,333

PACKAGING MEMBER Filed Oct. 22, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet s lg L WWW...

we F/ 9 4E United States Patent 3,215,333 PACKAGING MEMBER James S. Stelzer, Fort Wayne, Ind., assignor to Peter Eckrich & Sons, Inc., a corporation of Indiana Filed Oct. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 232,235 21 Claims. (Cl. 22951) This invention relates to packaging members and structures and more particularly relates to plastic envelope or enclosure packaging members for use in packaging food items.

The packaging of food items, and more especially the packaging of perishable food items, has received increased attention in recent years. It has become often desirable or even necessary for competitive reasons to package such items as sandwich meats, cheese, gas and vacuum packaged items, and the like, in plastic envelopes or similar containers. Such containers permit self-service marketing of many items where an attendant was previously necessary. Additionally, where transparent plastic materials are used in the package the consumer may visually examine the contents without direct contact with the package contents prior to their purchase. Goods so packaged have in recent years received more and more acceptance by the consumer.

However, many such packages do not lend themselves to ease of opening and a purchaser may have to resort to the use of a knife or other sharp implement to directly sever the plastic envelope to obtain the goods within. Where the plastic envelope is sufiiciently tough to resist the use of such an opening implement, the opening process can cause unintended and undesired mutilation of the package contents. Thus to relieve the consumer of the unnecessary burden of using extraneous implements for opening such packages, it is desirable to provide some means for more readily opening the package, e.g. with or without the use of a knife or other implement.

A general object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved packaging member or structure as herein set out.

More particularly it is an object of this invention to provide a readily openable package including a plastic envelope.

It is a further object to provide a new and useful rigid member which may be included as part of such a package rendering the package more readily openable.

It is another object of this invention to provide a member adapted to permit the exertion of shear stress upon a plastic envelope wherein the member includes two rigid portions between which a portion, e.g. an end or edge, or fold, of the envelope may be secured, and wherein the two rigid portions are provided with means for initiating and continuing a tear or cut through the rigid portions to exert shear stress upon the envelope for tearing or cutting the envelope open.

Still another object is to provide a rigid member having flaps on opposing ends, which flaps can be folded over to secure opposing ends of a plastic envelope between the flaps and adjacent portions of the rigid member and wherein the rigid member is perforated along a line extending through both flaps and including elongate slits along such line where the line traverses the fold of the flaps. It is an additional object to provide such a packaging member in combination with a plastic envelope which may have scalloped or serrated edges on the opposing ends thereof adapted to be secured by the flaps and wherein the rigid member can be torn along the perforated line by initiating the tear at one of the slits, thereby tearing the envelope open.

Yet another object is to provide a rigid member adapted to readily permit the exertion of shear stress upon a plas- 3,215,333 Patented Nov. 2, 1965 of the plastic envelope may be secured, and wherein the rigid member is provided with access means for directing the blade of a cutting implement between opposing folded surfaces of the folded under portion of the envelope, the envelope being secured to the rigid member so that normal cutting action of the blade against the inner side of the fold exerts a shear stress upon the plastic envelope rendering the plastic envelope more readily and more safely cuttable for opening purposes. An additional object is to provide such a packaging member in combination with a plastic envelope adapted to be secured to the rigid member and wherein the knife can be inserted through the rigid member through the access means provided therein to gain access to the inner portion of the fold for cutting the envelope open along the fold with the envelope secured on both sides of the fold line to the rigid member.

Other objects of this invention will be apparent to those in the art from the following descriptions and the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view of a package including an embodiment of a packaging member of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a section longitudinally through the package of FIGURE 1 taken along line 22;

FIGURE 3 is a section and view from the end of the package of FIGURE 1, taken along the line 33 in FIG- URE 2 and including an enlargement of one portion thereof;

FIGURE 4 is a top view of the package of FIGURE 1 showing plastic envelope construction in cutaway portions;

FIGURE 5 illustrates one form of an embodiment of the rigid member used in the package of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged section through a plastic film laminate used as a wall of the plastic envelope of the package of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged section through a plastic film laminate used as another wall of the plastic envelope of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 8 illustrates opening of a package using the rigid member of FIGURE 5 by means of the perforated tear line provided therein;

FIGURE 9 illustrates another form of the embodiment of the rigid member in a package using a plastic envelope of the construction illustrated in FIGURE 1 and partially disassembled to show detail; and

FIGURE 10 illustrates the opening of a completely assembled package of FIGURE 9.

In accordance with the foregoing objects, the present invention has provided a new and useful means for rendering packaged goods, especially those included within a plastic film container, more readily openable. Accordingly there is provided a rigid member which is securable to both sides of a portion of a flexible envelope and which includes means for initiating and continuing a tear or cut through the envelope while the rigid member exerts shear pressure on the envelope secured thereto.

While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail a specific embodiment of the invention and modification thereof, with the understanding that the present disclosure is considered to be an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment or modification illustrated.

Referring first to FIGURES l-S, there is provided a rigid member which is securable to both sides of a portion of a fiexible envelope and which includes means for initiating and continuing a tear through both portions of the rigid member so that the rigid member exerts shear pressure on the envelope secured between the two-rigid portions for initiating and continuing a guided tear through the envelope.

"Referring to FIGURES 1-4, there is illustrated a package which includes a rigid member, i.e. cardboard U- board 10, and a flexible plastic enclosure or envelope 30 which contains a stack of sliced sandwich meat 31.

U-board 10, best illustrated in FIGURE 5, includes inner flaps d and 100 which are foldable upward along fold lines 11 and 13 respectively. Flaps 10d and 100 are coated on their upper surfaces with adhesive as indicated by reference numerals 16 and 18 respectively. U-board base or intermediate portion 102 is defined by fold lines 11 and 13. A portion or strip of the U-board base 10e inside of each of fold lines 11 and 13 is also coated with adhesive material shown generally by reference numerals '15 and 17. Peripherally from inner flaps 10c and 10d respectively are outer flaps 10a and 10b which also form a part of U-board 10. Between the outer flaps 10a and 10b and the inner flaps 10c and 10d are scored fold lines 14 and 12 respectively.

U-board 10 is also provided with a perforated tear line 20 which includes elongated slits 21, 22, 23 and 24 at the intersection of perforated tear line 20 with fold lines 11, 13, 12 and 14 respectively. The elongated slits are longer than the perforations of line 20. The slits can constitute a plurality of perforations, i.e. two or more, interconnected lengthwise. As shown in FIGURE 5, slits 21 and 22 extend for inch on either side of fold lines 11 and 13 respectively, i.e. each of slits 21 and 22 is /2 inch in total length and provides a slit 4 inch in length when inner flaps 10c and 10d are folded along score lines or fold lines 13 and 11 as shown in FIGURES 1-4. Slits 21 and 22 define loci for starting a tear along perforated line 20 from either end of the package.

Slits 23 and 24 extend inch into inner flaps 10d and 10c respectively and extend laterally about A to 1 inch along the fold lines 12 and 14 between inner and outer flaps toward the edge of member 10 adjacent tear line 20. With flaps 10a and 10b folded along scored fold lines 14 and 12 respectively, as shown in FIGURES 1-4, slits 23 and 24 are tear directing slits. Slits 23 and 24 cause a tear progressing through the package to readily cross fold lines 12 and 14 by directing the tear of the top covering portion of envelope or enclosure around the package contents by shear pressure, thereby eliminating resistance to tearing which may be caused by encounter of the tear with the package contents.

Enclosure 30 is a sealed enclosure provided by a base portion such as unformed web 40 and a covering portion such as formed web 41 interconnected around their periphery such as by a heat seal indicated generally by reference numeral 42. Other means for interconnecting envelope portions, such as adhesives, may be used, of course, in lieu of the heat seal or a continuous formed envelope may be provided. Opposite ends of enclosure 30, includ ing ends of unformed web 40 and formed web 41 and the peripheral heat seal between the unformed and formed webs, are sandwiched between flaps 10c and 10d and the adjacent interior portions of U-board 10 and are secured in place between the flaps by the adhesive shown generally at reference numerals 15, 16, 17 and 18, holding both top and bottom surfaces of the envelope. Such securing of the end of the envelope between portions of the U-board prevents the envelope from slipping and thereby increases the shear stress which can be placed on the envelope by tearing of the U-board; thus, tearing of the envelope is facilitated. The thusly' secured ends of both unformed web 40 and formed web 41 are spaced inwardly from the folded fold lines 21 and 22 which constitute opposing ends of the total package. This arrangement is especially advantageous in that it permits initiation of the tear at slit 21 or slit 22 before the tear encounters enclosure 30. Preferably the envelope edges are spaced from the fold lines at least the effective length of slits 21 and 22, i.e. interiorly from slits 21 and 22. The other two edges or sides indicated generally at 44 and 45 of envelope 30 may lay against the rigid member, may be secured thereto and/ or may be folded under between envelope 30 and the intermediate portion 10a of U-board 10. Where folded under the edges preferably are laterally to and do not cross tear line 20 and form a tear guide for tearing the base portion of the envelope as will be more evident herein below.

The edges of the unformed and formed webs secured between the portions of the U-board are provided with scalloped configurations shown generally at 43 to render the edges of the webs more susceptible to initiation of tears by providing the edge with tear notches between each scallop. Thus, when the tear progresses to the envelope edge, its initiation in the envelope is assured. After initiation of the tear in the envelope, the tear usually progresses through the envelope under less shear than that needed to initiate the tear. Thus, the securing of the envelope between the two rigid members, i.e. 10s and either 10c or 10d, serves to initiate the tear and extend the tear into the enclosure-defining walls, e.g., interiorly of peripheral heat seal 42.

Tear directing slits 23 and 24 are provided so that a tear initiated at respective ends of the package along tear line 20 will progress more readily through the package. Without the lateral extension of the slits 23 and 24, the tear may encounter contents of the package which themselves would resist tearing and would normally tend to divert the tear line. However, it has been found that the tear tends to momentarily stop upon encountering the package contents and additional force is needed at this point to divert the tear, usually laterally toward the edge of the package adjacent the tear line. Therefore, the lateral extensions of slits 23 and 24 are provided as means for exerting shear pressure on the tear before or at about the time the tear reaches the package contents. It has been found that the lateral extensions permit resistance to tear due to the package contents. Because the tear is diverted laterally by the lateral extensions of slot 23 or 24, and because the edge 44 of the envelope has been folded under as illustrated in FIGURES 2-4, the tear of the covering portion of the envelope proceeds to the fold line of the folded under portion and thence down the fold line to the other end of the envelope. In a modification where edge 44 is not folded under, the tear of the covering portion of the envelope proceeds to the edge of the envelope and then continues down the edge of the envelope to the other end of the envelope.

In one advantageous form of the invention, the edges 44 and 45 of the envelope are folded under between the base portion of the envelope and the rigid member; however, the lateral edge is not disposed interiorly of tear line 20 and offers no resistance to the tearing action. In this form, the lateral edge of the envelope acts as a guide for tearing the base portion of the envelope. Thus, although the covering portion of the envelope may have its tear diverted laterally by slots 23 and 24, the base portion of the envelope is torn substantially along the tear line 20. In the illustrated embodiment, the tear line is closer to one side of the package than the other. In opening the package, flap 10d and the opposing portion of 10e on the side of tear line 20 closest to a lateral edge of the envelope may be torn backward along tear line 20. Both the base and covering portions of the envelope are torn by shear pressure. As the tear through the base portion proceeds, the normal tendency would be for the tear to wander laterally toward the edge of the envelope, there being no rigid member to prevent such wandering. Wandering of the tear into the central portion of the envelope is prohibited by the edge 20a of rigid member 10 provided by the torn perforations. Although with a little practice and acquired skill, one may become adept at maintaining the tear of the base portion of the envelope generally along the tear line of the rigid member, it

' cannot always be expected that the user will acquire such skill. Therefore, in the embodiment shown the folded under edge of envelope 30 presses against the bottom surface of the envelope during opening and provides an additional shear pressure member keeping the tear from wandering laterally of the folded under edge.

With respect to the construction of the envelope, any

flexible packaging material may be used for either the base portion and/or the covering portion. Examples of such suitable packaging materials are cellophane, polyethylene film, Mylar film, aluminum foil, paper, etc., which may be coated, if desired, with saran or other substances. Where it is desired to enclose the envelope by heat sealing, such readily heat scalable materials as polyethylene film are preferred. The usable packaging materials afford a wide range of applications wherein one or more portions of the envelope may be transparent or opaque as desired or may be colored or printed or otherwise marked. Laminated layers of different materials may also advantageously be used, e.g. containing printed material, primes, colored inks, etc. between laminated layers. It is preferred that both the covering portion and the base portion have very low oxygen and water vapor permeability rates and have good durability and have good machine workability. Because the materials normally used for packaging purposes in the construction of envelopes or enclosures, although they have considerable tensile strength, are weak in shear, the present invention, in its preferred application, takes advantage of the low shear strength of the plastics by providing means by which a significant shear force can be applied to the plastic material. As used herein, the term unformed web refers to a web or material which is of a flat sheet-like structure while the term formed web is a web of material which has been deformed by stretching or other pressure to provide a pouch suitable for enclosing by peripheral bonding to an unformed web. Methods for forming such formed Webs are well known.

As a more specific example of an envelope, the enclosure of FIGURES 1-4 includes a base portion which is an unformed web 40 and a covering portion which is a formed web 41. The unformed web 40 and formed web 41 are peripherally heat sealed at 42. The unformed web (FIGURE 6) is a laminate of aluminum foil 51 between a transparent cellophane film 52 and an opaque pigmented, e.g. white or yellow, flexible polyethylene film 53. Adhesive 54 is provided between foil 51 and cellophane 52 in a laminate and adhesive 55 is, in like manner, provided between foil 51 and polyethylene film 53. Formed Web 41 (FIGURE 7) includes a Mylar film 61 (a highly durable transparent film of polyethylene-terephthalate resin) having a saran coating 62. The coated side of Mylar film 61 is laminated to a transparent polyethylene film 63 by adhesive 64. Thus, unformed web 40 is opaque and formed Web 41 is a transparent web so that the contents of enclosure 30 may be viewed from the exterior.

In an advantageous embodiment of the unformed web, i.e. as illustrated in FIGURE 6, aluminum foil or other material capable of maintaining a dead fold is included within the web so that the sides 44 and 45 of enclosure 30 which are not secured by the flaps of the U-board may be folded under as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. The aluminum foil in unformed web 40 is sufiicient to overcome the memory or resiliency of the other plastic materials in both the unformed web and the formed web and thereby maintains the fold as a dead fold without the necessity of applying adhesives. The dead fold may advantageously be used to maintain a fold in the envelope, where and if desired, While assembling the envelope and rigid member. However, in other embodiments of the invention such adhesives can be used in lieu of or in addition to the dead fold. Additionally, other areas of the upper surface of U-board 10 may be coated with adhesive materials to secure unformed web 40 to the surface of U-board 10, although such adhesives are more usually unnecessary.

In opening the package of FIGURE 1, the package is simply torn along perforated line 20 by initiating the tear at either or both of elongated slits 21 and 22, as illustrated in FIGURE 8, providing edge 20a to guide the tear. The inner flaps 10c and 10d, which are folded over the scalloped ends of enclosure 30, serve to increase the shear stress placed upon unformed web 40 and formed web 41. It will be noted in the drawings that the scalloped ends of the formed and unformed webs are spaced from fold lines 11 and 13, preferably at least the distance corresponding to the length of slits 21 and 22 with the U-board in folded position. This spacing permits starting of the tear along perforated line 21 in U- board 10 prior to encountering the resistance of webs 40 and 41 to the shear action, resulting in increased ease in initiating the tear through the webs so that the package is more easily openable.

Turning now to FIGURE 9, another form of the rigid member is provided which omits perforated line 20. The reference numerals in FIGURE 9 correspond to those in FIGURES 1-7, Where repeated, and the discussions regarding FIGURES 1-7 may be referred to for identification. Provided in the rigid member of FIGURE 9, there is a slot 71 in portion 10e having perforated lines 72 extending therefrom to adjacent fold line 13 defining a tab 70. In opening the package, tab is pulled out exposing the folded under edge of the envelope, which is free for insertion of a knife between the folded edge and the adjacent envelope proper. The knife is inserted in slot 71, enlarged by removal of tab 70, with the blade of the knife being directed beneath the fold and toward the fold line of the envelope.

As shown in FIGURE 10, the knife edge faces the edge of the package adjacent slot 71 and tab 70 with the blade between fold 44 and the remainder of the envelope. Fold 44 is secured to portion 10c by adhesive 15 and 17, as are other portions of envelope 30. Cutting action with a knife causes a cut through board 10 laterally from slot 71 and also initiates a cut along the edge of envelope 30 through both the covering portion and base portion, while fold 44 and the remainder of the envelope are still secured to rigid member 10 so thatthe knife blade can provide sufficient shear force to the envelope to open the same. The cut proceeds down the envelope to the other end of the envelope and the covering portion and base portion of the envelope can thereupon be separated for removal of contents.

The rigid member, e.g. U-board, and envelope may be supplied separately or partially assembled by a packaging material source to a packager and the packager may include the substance to be packaged within the envelope or between films from which the envelope is to be constructed and thereafter assemble or finish assembling the package. Thus, the present invention also provides an envelope or enclosure member, which may be a partially formed or partially closed envelope or one or more films adapted to be assembled to form an envelope, and a rigid member, the envelope member and rigid member being adapted to be assembled with each other to form a package, e.g. as described hereinabove. I It is apparent from the foregoing that there has been provided a new and useful means for rendering packaged materials, such as packaged food stulfs, more readily openable. This packaging improvement is provided by a rigid member which is secured to both sides of a portion of flexible package enclosing member and which is adapted to permit ease in tearing or cutting of the envelope exerting shear pressure on the packaging material held between rigid member portions.

I claim:

1. A packaging member comprising a stiff backing member for backing an envelope, stiff fiap means integral with said backing member, fold-line means between said backing member and flap means, first weakened line means in said backing member extending from a first edge portion of said backing member to a second edge portion of said backing member spaced generally across said backing member from said first edge portion, said flap means being foldable along said fold-line means for overlying said backing member at said first and second edge portions, adhesive means on the flap means for securing an envelope between said fiap means and backing member, and second weakened line means in said flap means shaped to overlie and generally register with said first weakened line means at said first and second edge portions with said flap means folded upon said backing member, whereby said first and second weakened line means define a tear-line extending from said first edge portion and across said stiff member to said second edge portion.

2. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said stiff member, a first fold-line between said stiff member and said first flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold-line between said second flap and said stiff member, said flaps being foldable upon said stiff member along said fold-lines for securing opposing edges of a plastic envelope between said flaps and stiff member, an elongated weakened line traversing said stiff member, said weakened line in association with said stiff member and atleast one of the flaps providing a tear-line in said stiff member extending and connecting edge portions of said stiff member spaced generally across said stiff member, and means for securing a plastic envelope between the flaps and stiff member at spaced positions along said weakened line respectively adjacent said spaced edge portions of said stiff member.

3. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said member, a first foldline between said stiff member and said first flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold-line between said second flap and said stiff member, and a weakened line traversing said first flap and first fold-line and extending into said stiff member, means for securing said flaps to opposing edges of a plastic envelope with said flaps folded upon the opposing plastic envelope edges and with the opposing plastic envelope edges between said flaps and said stiff member, the portion of said weakened line in said first flap aligning with the portion of said weakened line in said stiff mem ber to comprise a tear-line from said first fold-line through said first flap and stiff member with said flaps folded upon said stiff member.

4. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said member, a first foldline between said stiff member and said first flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold-line between said second flap and said stiff member, first and second elongated slits at said first and second fold-lines respectively and extending into the stiff member, said first slit traversing said first fold-line and extending into said first flap, and a weakened line traversing said stiff member and first flap and connecting said slits, means for securing said flaps to opposing edges of a plastic envelope with said flaps folded along said fold-lines upon said stiff member and with the opposing edges of the envelope between said flaps and stiff member, the portion of said weakened line in said first flap aligning with the portion of said weakened line in said stiff member to comprise a tear-line between said foldlines through said first flap and stiff member with said flaps folded upon said stiff member.

5. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said member, a first fold line between said stiff member and said first flap, a -second stiff flap on an opposing-edge of said stiff member, a second fold line between said second flap and said stiff member, first and second elongated slits traversing said first and second fold lines respectively and extending into the stiff member and into the flaps, and a weakened line connecting said slits, said slits and weakened line traversing said flaps, said flaps being adapted to fold upon said stiff member along said fold lines and being adapted to secure opposing edges of a plastic envelope between said flaps and said stiff member, the portions of said weakened line in said stiff flaps being adapted to align with the portion of said weakened line in said stiff member to comprise a tear-line between said fold lines through said flaps and stiff member with said flaps folded upon said stiff member.

6. The packaging member of claim 5 wherein the first and second foldable flaps include third and fourth foldable flaps respectively, a third fold line in said first flap substantially parallel to said first fold line defining the inner edge of said third flap, a fourth fold line in said second flap substantially parallel to said second fold line and defining the inner edge of said fourth flap, a third elongated slit extending from said third fold line into said third flap and extending laterally along said third fold line and terminating within said third fold line, a fourth elongated slit extending from said fourth fold line into said fourth flap and extending laterally along said fourth fold line and terminating in said fourth fold line, the extensions of said third and fourth slits into said third and fourth flaps respectively being aligned with and overlying the portion of the weakened line in said stiff member when said first and second flaps are folded upon said stiff member.

7. An article of manufacture comprising the packaging member of claim 5 and a plastic envelope having opposing ends received and secured between the first and second flaps respectively and said stiff member, said ends being adjacent the first and second fold lines and being spaced from the first and second fold lines at said elongated slits.

8. A packaging combination which comprises an envelope, a stiff member for backing said envelope, means in said stiff member defining an envelope opening line, means securing said envelope to said backing member with edge portions of said envelope traversing said envelope opening line at positions spaced substantially one full dimension of said envelope, said securing means securing said envelope to said backing member on each side of said envelope opening line enabling shear pressure to be exerted on the envelope for initiating a tear or out along the opening line, said opening line extending substantially said one full dimension of the envelope between said spaced positions and crossing the edge of the envelope at each of said spaced positions for exerting shear pressure throughout substantially said one full dimension of the envelope.

9. The packaging member of claim 8 wherein said defining means includes means on said stiff member for directing a tear or cut through the length of substantially said one full dimension of said envelope and for directing the tear or cut away from contents of said envelope.

10. The packaging combination of claim 9 wherein said envelope has a longitudinal fold lying along said envelope opening line and defining said one full dimension, and said defining means comprises means for receiving the blade of a knife in said longitudinal fold.

11. A packaging combination comprising an envelope having walls joined at a sealed peripheral edge defining an enclosure and including first and second envelope edge portions spaced from each other generally across the envelope, a backing member backing said edge portions and the envelope wall extending therebetween, stiff flap means integral with said backing member, fold-line means between said backing member and flap means, first weakened line means in said backing member extending from the portion of said backing member backing said first envelope edge portion to the portion of said backing member backing said second envelope edge portion, said flap means being folded and overlying the envelope edge, means securing said envelope between said flap means and backing member, and second weakened line means in said flap means at said first edge portion and generally registering with said first weakened line means to define a tear-line extending from said first edge portion and across said envelope to said second edge portion, said tear-line including means for initiating a tear through the envelope edge at said first edge portion.

12. The packaging combination of claim 11 wherein said weakened line means crosses said fold-line means.

13. A packaging combination comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said stiff member, a first fold-line between said stiff member and said first flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold-line between said second flap and said stiff member, a weakened line traversing said stiff member, an envelope having walls joined at a sealed peripheral edge defining an enclosure and including first and second edge portions spaced from each other generally across the envelope, said envelope being positioned upon said stiff member with said first and second edge portions lying generally across said weakened line, said flaps being folded upon said sealed peripheral edge, means securing the envelope between the flaps and stiff member adjacent said weakened line, said weakened line in assooiation with said stiff member and at least one of the flaps providing a tear-line in said stiff member extending through said first edge portion and across the envelope walls intermediate of said first and second edge portions to said second edge portion with said flaps in position securing said envelope.

14. A packaging combination comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said stiff member, a first fold line between said stiff member and said stiff flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold line between said second stiff flap and said stiff member, first and second elongated slits traversing said first and second fold lines respectively and extending into the stiff member and into the flaps, and a weakened line connecting said slits and beyond said slits traversing said flaps from said slits, a plastic envelope member having opposing ends, said flaps being adapted to fold upon said stifl member along said fold lines and being adapted to secure the opposing ends of the plastic envelope member between said flaps and said stiff member at and on each side of said weakened line, said weakened line in said flaps being adapted to align with the weakened line in said stiff member to comprise a tear-line between said fold lines through said flaps and stiff member with said flaps folded upon said stiff member.

15. A packaging combination comprsing a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said stiff member, a first fold line between said stiff member and said first flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a second fold line between said second flap and said stiff member, first and second elongated slits traversing said first and second fold lines respectively and extending into the stiff member and into the flaps, a perforated line connecting said slits and perforated lines traversing said flaps from said slits, a plastic envelope having opposing scalloped edges and being adapted to be positioned upon said stiff member with the scalloped edges of said envelope adjacent and spaced from said first and second fold lines respectively, said flaps being adapted to fold upon and cover said scalloped edges along said fold lines and secure the plastic envelope between the flaps and stiff member adjacent the scalloped edges of said envelope, said perforated lines in said flaps being adapted to align with the perforations in sad stiff member to comprise a tear-line between said fold lines through the flaps, scalloped edges, envelope and stiff member with said flaps in position securing said envelope.

16. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first stiff flap on one edge of said member, a first fold line between said stiff member and said stiff flap, a second stiff flap on an opposing edge of said stiff member, a sec- 0nd fold line between said second stiff flap and said stiff member, a perforated line traversing said stiff member, fold lines and flaps, a flexible envelope having opposing ends, said flaps being folded upon stiff member along said fold lines and securing the opposing ends of said envelope between said flaps and said stiff member, the perforations in said stiff flaps being adapted to align with the perforations in said stiff member to comprise a tear-line between said fold lines through said flaps and stiff member with said flaps folded upon said stiff member, and means for initiating a tear along said tear-line at one of said fold lines.

17. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first fold in said stiff member adjacent one edge of said stiff member defining a first flap, a second fold adjacent an opposing edge of said stiff member defining a second flap, said first and second flaps being folded upon an interior portion of said stiff member between said flaps, a flexible plastic envelope having opposing ends with scalloped edges secured respectively between said first and second flaps and the intermediate portion of said stiff member, said scalloped edges being spaced from said folds, first and second elongated slits traversing said first and second folds respectively and extending into said intermediate portion and into said flaps, and a perforated line extending through said intermediate portion from said first elongated slit to said second elongated slit and traversing said flaps from said slits.

18. The packaging member of claim 17 wherein said stiff member includes means for directing a tear away from the contents of said plastic envelope and wherein said envelope includes means for directing a tear through said plastic envelope substantially along said perforated line.

19. A packaging member comprising a stiff member, a first fold in said stiff member adjacent one edge of said stiff member defining a first flap, a second fold adjacent an opposing edge of said stiff member defining a second flap, said first and second flaps being folded upon an interior portion of said stiff member between said flaps, a rectangular flexible plastic envelope having a heat sealed periphery defining opposing ends and opposing sides, means securing the opposing ends of said envelope respectively between said first and second flaps and the intermediate portion of said stiff member, and means directing an opening tear or cut extending the distance between said envelope ends.

20. The packaging member of claim 19 wherein a side of said rectangular envelope is defined by a fold the length of said envelope disposing a side of said envelope between the envelope and stiff member.

21. A packaging member comprising a stiff cardboard U-board having first and second flaps at opposing ends, first and second fold lines along the fold of said flaps, third and fourth fold lines within said first and second flaps defining third and fourth flaps respectively, substantially parallel to said first and second fold lines, first and second elongated slits adjacent one side of said U-board traversing said first and second fold lines respectively, said first and second slits extending about one-quarter of an inch into said stiff member and said first and second flaps and being in linear alignment, a perforated line traversing said U- board and defining a substantially straight line joining the ends of said first and second slits, said first and second flaps being folded upon adjacent portions of the base of said U-board along said first and second fold lines, third and fourth elongated slits extending from the juncture of said straight line with said third and fourth fold lines respectively into said first and second flaps away from said third and fourth flaps and extending along said third and fourth fold lines respectively toward said one side of said U-board and terminating within said third and fourth lines respectively, a plastic envelope having opposing ends secured between said first and second flaps and said base, said plastic envelope being a rectangular envelope con- 1 1 structed of opposing facing peripherally joined by a heat seal around the periphery of said webs, the opposing ends of said envelope having scalloped edges and being spaced from said folds at least interiorly of said first and second slits, the two opposing sides of said envelope having opposing edges as part of said periphery defining a width of said envelope greater than the width of said U-board, folds along the length of said envelope adjacent to and parallel to said side edges, decreasing the effective width of said envelope to within the limits of the width of said U-board, said folds directing the two remaining side edges of said envelope into a space between said envelope and the base of said U-board, the ends of said folds being secured with the remainder of the ends of said plastic envelope, said third and fourth flaps upstanding from said first and second flaps adjacent the secured ends of said envelope, said packaging member being openable by initiating a tear in said perforated line at said first or second slit and tearing along said perforated line, whereby a shear force is exerted upon a scalloped end of said envelope between said first or second flap and said base of said U-board, said tear progressing readily through said up standing third and fourth flaps as a result of said third and fourth slits.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,157,462 10/15 Van Wormer 229-51 2,499,528 3/50 Reitzes 22985 2,621,129 12/52 Ramsbottom 206-46 X 2,745,545 5/56 Dunning 20678 2,802,569 8/57 Massey 206-78 2,813,624 11/57 Phipps 20878 2,838,404 6/58 Cohen.

3,061,091 10/62 Wichman 20678 3,069,066 12/62 Peckham 229-66 X FOREIGN PATENTS 509,364 2/53 Belgium.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3556292 *Jul 17, 1969Jan 19, 1971Milprint IncDisplay package
US3913734 *Mar 7, 1974Oct 21, 1975Pharmacare IncPackage assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/461, 426/124, D09/456, 426/396, 426/129, 206/469
International ClassificationB65D75/28, B65D75/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/366, B65D2575/367
European ClassificationB65D75/36F