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Publication numberUS3215334 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateNov 14, 1963
Priority dateNov 14, 1963
Publication numberUS 3215334 A, US 3215334A, US-A-3215334, US3215334 A, US3215334A
InventorsDonald Whitlow Henry, Neal Jr Thomas H
Original AssigneeDeering Milliken Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package opener
US 3215334 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 2, 1965 T. H. NEAL, JR.. ETAL 3, ,33

PACKAGE OPENER Filed Nov. 14, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. -4- THOMAS H. NEAL,JR.

HENRY D, WHITLOW BY M rg Mia ATTORNEY N v- 2, 196 'r. H. NEAL, JR., ETAL 3,215,334

PACKAGE OPENER Filed Nov. 14, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. THOMAS H. NEAL,JR HENRY D. WHITLOW BY M Q.M/-

' ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,215,334 PACKAGE OPENER Thomas H. Neal, J12, (llemson, and Henry Donald Whitlow, Pendleton, S.C., assignors to Deering Milliiren Research Corporation, Spartanburg, S.C., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 14, 1963, Ser. No. 323,829 1 Claim. (Cl. 229-51) This invention relates generally to the packaging of cylindrical shaped objects and more particularly to a readily openable roll of packaged fabric.

In the textile industry, fabric is normally shipped from the mills to the consumer in elongated cylindrical rolls. To protect the roll of fabric it is necessary to wrap the roll in a heavy paper or the like and seal same so that damage and soilage to the fabric is maintained at a minimum. It has been found that when the fabric roll is properly wrapped and sealed that the consumer has to spend considerable time and effort in removing the outer paper wrapping before the fabric enclosed therein can be used. Furthermore it has been found on numerous occasions that the fabric contained within the wrapping was soiled or damaged indicating that the fabric roll had been opened and rewrapped by some unauthorized personnel prior to the receipt of the fabric by the consumer and after shipment by the manufacturer. In cases such as this the manufacturer has to stand the loss or replace the fabric roll since it is almost impossible for the manufacturer to prove that the fabric roll was not wrapped in this damaged or soiled condition and that the package had not been rewrapped.

Therefore, it is an object of this invention to provide a wrapped fabric roll which can be readily opened with a minimum effort.

Another object of this invention is to provide a wrapped fabric roll which incorporates a quick opening cord member within the package.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a wrapped fabric roll in which a cord or like member is sealed between the fabric and the wrapping and has an end projecting therefrom which will readily sever the paper wrapping to expose the fabric when it is ready for use.

A fourth object of the invention is to provide a wrapped fabric roll which will indicate Whether the fabric roll has been rewrapped after the initial wrapping.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be clearly apparent as the specification proceeds to describe the invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the fabric roll and wrapping paper before the roll is wrapped;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the fabric roll wrapped prior to sealing of the ends;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of the wrapped fabric roll prior to sealing of one end;

FIGURE 4 is a partial perspective view of the end of the fabric roll shown unsealed in FIGURES 2 and 3;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the wrapped fabric roll after the rip cord has severed the wrapping; and

FIGURES 6-8 are partial perspective views of modified methods of securing the end of the rip cord to the inner tubular fabric support member.

Looking now to FIGURES 1-5, the preferred form of the invention is shown with the reference numeral 10 designating an elongated roll of fabric rolled onto a hollow tubular support member 12 of cardboard or like material. In FIGURES 1-5 the support member 12 is shown flush with the ends of the fabric roll. The preferred embodiment of FIGURES 1-5 and that of FIG- URE 6 can be employed when the tubular member 12 is flush with the fabric roil 1G or when the tubular member 12 projects out one end or the other or both of the fabric roll 10. The embodiments of FIGURES 7 and 8 require that the tubular member 12 project out of at least one end of the fabric roll.

The first step of wrapping the fabric roll 10 is shown in FIGURE 1. The fabric roll is located on the wrapping paper 16 with the indicating strip 17 and the rip cord 18 located between the roll 10 and the wrapping paper. Rip cord 18 of rope, twine, or other suitable material projects outside of both ends of the wrapping paper 16. Preferably portion 20 of rip cord 18 will have a loop formed thereon for grasping purposes. The other end of rip cord projecting beyond the edge 24 of the wrapping paper 16 will also be formed in a loop 26. Within the loop 26 is a strip of sealing tape 28 of suitable material.

Looking now to FIGURE 2 it can be seen that the wrapping paper is folded around the fabric roll 10 and the overlapping longitudinal edge is sealed by a sealing strip 30 of any suitable material. Wrapping paper 16 is torn along the longitudinal axis of the fabric roll 10 to a point substantially even with the roll of fabric to provide an opening 14 to allow the rip cord 18 to project outwardly from the package so that the loop 22 can be readily grasped. As shown in FIGURE 3 the paper overlapping the right hand end is then folded in any suitable manner and the folds are secured in position by sealing strip 32 leaving the loop 22 projecting out of the package. The left hand end is also folded leaving the loop 26 projecting therefrom.

To complete the wrapping, the tape 28 within the loop 26 (FIGURE 4) is placed across the folds of the left hand end thereby sealing the left hand of the package and securing the end of the rip cord 18 to the package. The slack in the rip cord 18 is taken up by merely pulling on the loop 22 in a direction away from the left hand of the package. If desired the loop 22 can be temporarily taped or attached to the package so that it does not become entangled during shipment.

Indicating strip 17 is also of paper or other suitable material which can be readily severed. Printed or marked on indicating strip is a design or code which can not be re-aligned or re-constructed once the indicating strip 17 has been severed. Indicating strip 17 is located in such a position between the wrapping paper and the rip cord 18 such that the indicating strip 17 will be severed whenever the wrapping paper 16 is severed. It is necessary that the indicating strip be so located that upon severance of the wrapping paper 16 the indicating strip will also be severed.- The particular shape, size, and type of indicating paper does not form part of this invention. Furthermore, the indicating paper 17 can be secured in position in any suitable manner. In the preferred form of the invention the indicating paper 17 will be rolled up with the wrapping paper 16 and thereby held in position when the wrapping paper 16 is sealed.

Once the indicating strip 17 has been severed it would be diflicult for anyone to replace or re-align such strip since it is proposed to place thereon a design or code which will not lend itself for re-alignment or duplication. In this manner, the manufacturer and/ or the customer can tell whether the fabric roll has been rewrapped after the initial Wrapping by the manufacturer.

To open the package, as shown in FIGURE 5, the consumer grasps the loop 22 of the rip cord 18 and pulls it toward the loop 26 which is secured to the package thereby slitting the .paper wrap 16 on the package along a line 34 and the indicator strip on a line 35 to expose the fabric roll underneath.

FIGURES 6-8 show modified ways to secure one end of the rip cord 18 in order to properly slit the paper wrapping. In FIGURES 6-8 the paper wrapping and indicating strip 17 has been omitted for the sake of clarity since the secured one end of the rip cord will be within the paper wrapping.

As pointed out hereinbefore the modification shown in FIGURE 6 does not necessarily require the tubular member 12 to project out beyond the fabric roll 10 but the modification of FIGURES 7 and 8 do require at least one end to project out beyond the fabric roll 10. In the modification of FIGURE 6 the end of the rip cord 18 is secured to the tubular member 12 by inserting the loose end into the tube and inserting a plug member 36 of any material into the end of the tube 12 to secure the .rip cord therein. The plug member 36 can assume most any shape as long as it secures the rip cord in the tube 12.

In the modification of FIGURE 7 the loop 26 is telescoped over one end of the tube 12 and pulled tight.

In FIGURE 8 two notches 38 and 40 are cut into the tube, the end of the cord 18 is knottedand the rip cord is placed in the notches and pulled tight so that the knot will engage the tube member 12. If desired, a single notch can be used and the knot 42 will then be pulled tight against the inner surface of the tube 12.

The modification of FIGURES 6-8 are merely illustrative since it is within the scope of the invention for the rip cord to be placed within the tube member 12 and sealed thereto by glue, tape, or other types of mechanical fasteners such as staples, etc.

The herein disclosed wrapped fabric roll has many obvious advantages. The fabric is tightly and securely wrapped so that it will not be damaged during shipment but at the same time is readily accessible to the consumer by the use of the rip cord. Further, the installation of the rip cord is simple in design and can be accomplished with a minimum of time and effort. Furthermore, the novel inclusion of the indicating strip provides a securely wrapped package which can not be opened and rewrapped without the knowledge of the consumer and/or manufacturer.

Although we have described in detail the preferred embodiments of our invention, we contemplate that many changes may be made without departing from the scope or spirit of our invention, and we desire to be limited only by the claim.

That which is claimed is:

A wrapped package comprising: a support memher, a roll of material wound on said support member, said support member being substantially flush with the ends of the material wound thereon, a wrapping means wrapped around said material to prevent damage thereto, a rip cord located between said material and wrapping means, said rip cord having two ends with one of said ends projecting out of one end of said package, the other end of said rip cord projecting outwardly of the other end of said package and being formed into a loop, said wrapping means being folded on the ends of said package, and securing means including a sealing tape in said loop and attached to said package over said folds to seal said folds and to secure said loop to said package whereby said rip cord will tear said wrapping means when said one end of said rip cord is pulled toward said other end.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 568,340 9/96 Duval 22951 808,114 12/05 Rowley. 885,517 4/08 Prescott. 1,870,519 8/32 Leguillon. 1,978,035 10/34 Thom 229-51 2,023,030 12/35 Plunkett 229-5l 2,166,171 7/39 McBean 22987.2 2,451,468 10/48 Boyce. 2,701,053 2/55 Tamarin 229-51 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US568340 *Feb 15, 1895Sep 29, 1896 Charles lotjis duval
US808114 *Feb 8, 1905Dec 26, 1905Robert RowleyThread-holding device.
US885517 *Jan 29, 1908Apr 21, 1908Elizabeth S PrescottThread-holder for spools.
US1870519 *Jan 8, 1930Aug 9, 1932Goodrich Co B FPackage and method of making the same
US1978035 *Sep 20, 1932Oct 23, 1934Us Tobacco CoPackage and method of making the same
US2023030 *Mar 1, 1933Dec 3, 1935Patent & Licensing CorpMethod of wrapping packages
US2166171 *Apr 13, 1934Jul 18, 1939Beech Nut Packing CompanyPackage and method of forming the same
US2451468 *Jul 1, 1944Oct 19, 1948American Viscose CorpWinding of yarn
US2701053 *Feb 3, 1947Feb 1, 1955Pull Packaging IncCigarette package with pull strip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4911299 *Jun 29, 1989Mar 27, 1990Agfa-Gevaert, N.W.Packaged rolled web of light sensitive material and method of packaging same
US5329934 *Dec 9, 1992Jul 19, 1994Bowman Karolen CMedical patient restraint device
US5439008 *Dec 22, 1993Aug 8, 1995Bowman; Karolen C.Infant reflux restraint apparatus
US5492221 *Nov 2, 1994Feb 20, 1996Eastman Kodak CompanyLight-tight package
US5636739 *Jun 5, 1995Jun 10, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Wrapping material having a pull tab and pull indicia for wrapping a floral arrangement
US5689933 *May 31, 1995Nov 25, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Wrapping material having a pull tab and pull indicia for wrapping a floral arrangement and method
US5738215 *Jan 30, 1997Apr 14, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Wrapping material having a pull tab and method
US5930981 *Feb 12, 1998Aug 3, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc. As Trustee Of The Family Trust U/T/A Dtd 12/8/95Wrapping material having a pull tab and pull indicia for both wrapping a floral arrangement and removing the wrapping material from a floral arrangement and method
WO2016165686A1 *Mar 29, 2016Oct 20, 2016Johann RoiserPackage for rolled stock
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/389, 206/410, 229/87.5
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D75/68
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/68
European ClassificationB65D75/68