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Publication numberUS3215405 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateNov 6, 1962
Priority dateNov 6, 1962
Publication numberUS 3215405 A, US 3215405A, US-A-3215405, US3215405 A, US3215405A
InventorsRalph E Walsh
Original AssigneeBreeze Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fleet angle control device
US 3215405 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. E. WALSH 3,215,405

FLEET ANGLE CONTROL DEVICE Nov. 2, 1965 Filed Nov. 6, 1962. 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. 644 PH .5 P1441514 MW M Nov. 2, 1965 R. E. WALSH 3,215,405

FLEET ANGLE CONTROL DEVICE Filed Nov. 6, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 7 FIG. 6

y M 5 M o I I 0 1 i j 35 X90 0 14 fill l/ 25 i2 76 if I N VEN TOR. @144 PH .5. W44

Arroevay United States Patent 3,215,405 FLEET ANGLE CONTROL DEVICE Ralph E. Walsh, Long Branch, N..I., assignor to Breeze Corporations, Inc., Union, N.J., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Nov. 6, 1962, Ser. No. 235,746 6 Claims. (Cl. 254-190) which are airborne, a substantial amount of cable wear results from the excessive swinging of the load secured to the end of the cable. If the cable is reeled in the swinging action steadily increases so that the fleet angle grows larger as the cable becomes shorter and shorter. The

excessive fleet angle further increases wear on the cable guide members and substantially shortens the useful life of these portions of the winch or hoist.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a fleet angle control device for interrupting -the operation of a hoist or winch when fleet angles become excessive.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a fleet angle control device which can be attached to the structure of presently used hoists or winches without substantially altering said devices.

A further object of the present invention is to provide "a fleet angle control device which will shut off the hoist or winch motor when the cable has reached its upper limit of travel.

Still another object of the present invention is to prof vide a compact fleet angle control device.

'A feature of the present invention is the use of one "or more switch members responsive to the fleet angle of 'the cable for interrupting the operation of the winch or hoist motor.

Another feature of the present invention is the use of a spring loaded plate for actuating the motor control switches.

Still another feature of the present invention is-its use 'of a novel swivel member between the cable and the switch means to translate the swinging motion of the cable into a switch operating rectilinear motion.

The invention consists of the construction, combination and arrangement of parts, as herein illustrated, described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof are illustrated two forms of embodiment of the invention, in which drawings similar reference characters designate corresponding parts, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view in side elevation of a complete embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a view in vertical section of the fleet angle control device shown in FIGURE 1.

, FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal section taken on line 33 in FIGURE 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 on an enlarged scale showing the effect of a large fleet angle upon the device.

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIGURE 4 showing the operation of the present invention as a limit control.

'FIGURE 6 is a view in vertical section of a second 1 embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 showing the effect of cable swing.

terns available through the use of the embodimenst shown in FIGURES 15, 6 and 7.

3,215,405 Patented Nov. 2, 1965 Referring to the drawings and particularly to FIG- URES 15, 10 indicates a fleet angle control device secured by a bracket 11 to an aircraft 12 or other suitable vehicle. The fleet ,angle control device 10 is built within a housing 13 to which there is laterally attached a metal box 14.

The box 14 carries one or more switch members 15 therein and retains the end of a cable 16. The cable 16 is connected to the switch member 15 and also to the source of rotary power for the winch or hoist (not shown). The switch members 15 may also be used to operate remote indicator lights or other required electrical apparatus.

The housing 13 is externally threaded at the lower end thereof as indicated at 17 to receive thereon a nut member 18. The nut 18 retains a spherical bearing assembly 19 which is free to swing with the motion of the cable 20 which passes therethrough. It will be seen that the spherical bearing assembly is made up of-a central guide portion 21 which is axially bored and tapered as indicated at 22, to minimize cable wear. The spherical member 19 surrounds the guide portion 21, and rides within a socketlike portion 23 which is held within the housing 13, by the nut 18 and a retaining ring 24.

The top of the guide portion 21 is provided with cam surfaces 25, best shown in FIGURES 2, 4 and 5, which bear against the bottom surface 26 of an actuator plate 27.

In the embodiment shown in FIGURE 2-5, the actuator plate 27 is a flat disc-like member having a central aperture 28, to permit the cable 20, to pass therethrough. The actuator plate 27 is disposed within the housing 13, normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. A flat spring member 29 such as the wave spring shown in FIGURES 2-5, is carried within the housing 13 above the actuator plate 27 and in contact with the upper surface 30, thereof.

The wave spring 29 also bears against the lower surface 31 of the mounting bracket 11. A snap-ring 32 is carried by the housing 13 and extends into the plate receiving chamber 33 of the housing to limit the downward motion of the actuator plate 27.

The wave spring 29 urges the actuator plate against the snap-ring 32 during normal or permissive cable fleet angles.

The operating arm 33 of the switch member or switch members 15 extends through a lateral bore 34 in the housing 13 and is disposed in the path of travel of the actuator plate 27 as hereinafter more fully described.

When the cable member 20 begins to swing as by the motion of some load secured to the bottom thereof, the spherical bearing assembly 19 will be rocked as indicated in FIGURE 4. The cam surface 25 at the top of the guide portion 21 of the bearing assembly 19, will thereupon force the actuator plate upwardly against the pressure of the spring 29. The upper surface 30 of the actuator plate will thereupon force the switch arm 33 upwardly to operate the switch and cut off the power supply to the Winch or hoist. It will be seen that by regulating the clearance between the actuator plate 27 and the bottom of the switch arm 33 the precise amount of fleet angle which will be permitted before the power is cut off, can be regulated.

In addition to limiting the swing of the cable 20 the control device 10 can be used as a limit switch to stop the winch or hoist at the end of the cable travel. For this purpose, a bumper 35, best shown in FIGURES 1 and 5, is secured to the cable 20 at a suitable distance from the end thereof. As the cable 20 is reeled in, the bumper 35 will be brought into contact with the bottom of the guide portion 21 of the spherical bearing assembly 19. Since there is vertical play provided for between the guide portion 21 and the spherical members 22 as shown in FIGURES 2-5, the guide portion 21 will be forced upwardly by the bumper and cause the actuator plate 27 to operate the switch 15.

Referring to FIGURES 6 and 7, there is shown the application of the fleet angle control device to a further embodiment in which the pattern of swing may be controlled to satisfy the installation requirements of the winch or hoist.

In FIGURE 8 there is shown a hoist which is mounted outboard of an aircraft 12. In such installations it may be desirable to .limit the swing of the load so that it will not pass under the aircraft and be lost sight of. The fleet angle controlled device hereinabove described and illustrated in FIGURES l-S, will provide such an asymmetric pattern because of the fact that the switch actuating arm 33 is not located on the center line of the actuator plate 27.

However, in other installations such as the one shown in FIGURE 9, a symmetrical pattern may be desired, which pattern can be achieved by making the actuator plate wedge-shaped as illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 7, at 36.

In this embodiment of the invention, a swing of the cable in the direction of the thickened portion of the actuator plate 36, as illustrated in FIGURE 7, will cause the upper surface 37 to bear against a small shoulder 38, in the housing 13. Further motion of the spherical bearing assembly 19 will cause the cam surface 25, at the top of the guide portion 21, to raise the OPPosite side of the actuator plate 36 and operate the switch 15. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that a wide variety of swing patterns may be provided by varying the shape and thickness of the actuator plate 36.

From the foregoing it will be seen that there has been provided a fleet angle control device and limit control device for the cables of winches, hoists and the like which is compact in size, simple in operation, and will serve to interrupt the power to the winch or hoist when cable swing becomes excessive. As a result of the interruption of cable movement the load can be held at a fixed point until the swinging motion subsides to the permissable limits which will insure prolonged cable life.

Having thus fully described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. A device for controlling the fleet angle of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passage in said housing to receive a cable therethrough, an internal bearing member carried within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a bore in the spherical bearing registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing, a plate within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical bearing will operate the switch means.

2. A device for controlling the fleet angle of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passage in said housing to receive a cable there through, an internal bearing member carried Within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a bore in the spherical bearing registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing, an axially bored mounting bracket extending into the passage, a plate within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, a spring between the plate and mounting bracket to urge the plate against the cam surfaces, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical hearing will operate the switch means.

3. A device for controlling the fleet angle of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passage in said housing to receive a cable therethrough, an internal bearing member carried within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a longitudinal shiftable guide portion within the spherical bearing, a bore in the spherical hearing guide portion registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing guide portion, a plate within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical bearing will operate the switch means.

4. A device for controlling the fleet angle .of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passagein said housing to receive a cable therethrough, an internal bearing member carried within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a bore in the spherical bearing registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing, an axially bored mounting bracket extending into the passage, a plate within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, a wave spring between the plate and mounting bracket to urge the plate against the cam surfaces, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical bearing will overcome the loading of the wave spring and operate the switch means.

5. A device for controlling the fleet angle of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passage in said housing to receive a cable therethrough, an internal bearing member carried within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a bore in the spherical bearing registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing, a plate having a substantially wedgeshaped cross section within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical hearing will operate the switch means.

6. A device for controlling the fleet angle of winch cables and the like comprising a hollow housing, a longitudinal passage in said housing to receive a cable therethrough, an internal bearing member carried within the passage in the housing, a substantially spherical bearing rockably carried by the internal bearing coaxial with the housing passage, a bore in the spherical bearing registering with said passage to receive the cable therethrough, cam surfaces on the upper portion of the spherical bearing, an axially bored mounting bracket extending into the passage, a plate having a substantially wedge-shaped cross section within the housing disposed in operative relationship with the cam surfaces, an opening in the plate to receive the cable therethrough, a wave spring between the plate and mounting bracket to urge the plate against the cam surfaces, switch means carried by the housing, a switch arm on the switch means adjacent the plate and engageable thereby, whereby motion imparted to the plate by the rocking motion of the spherical bearing will overcome the loading of the wave spring and operate the switch means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,266,660 12/41 Sloan 254-173 2,328,266 8/43 Durbin 200-153.19 2,418,105 3/47 Wohler.

2,692,102 10/54 Cobham 254-173 SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2418105 *Mar 29, 1944Mar 25, 1947Budd CoFairlead
US2692102 *Mar 31, 1950Oct 19, 1954Flight Refueling LtdApparatus for towing and refueling aircraft in flight
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3886888 *Oct 1, 1973Jun 3, 1975Charles O ParsonsSki rope retrieving device
US3902701 *Sep 24, 1973Sep 2, 1975Bendix CorpGimbaled sheave with cable angle sensors
US3968954 *May 17, 1974Jul 13, 1976General Dynamics CorporationOceanographic apparatus
US3982733 *Jan 8, 1975Sep 28, 1976The Bendix CorporationGimbaled sheave with cable angle sensors
US4013270 *Mar 29, 1976Mar 22, 1977Breeze Corporations, Inc.Combined winch and boom assembly
US4168821 *Apr 20, 1978Sep 25, 1979Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm GmbhCable guide for movable cables
US4274165 *Feb 11, 1980Jun 23, 1981Ivko Joseph JSelf-aligning cable guide assembly
US5645269 *Jun 7, 1995Jul 8, 1997Wireline TechnologiesSheave cable guarding and guiding device
US5829737 *Apr 8, 1997Nov 3, 1998Mannesmann AktiengesellschaftRope guide for a winch having two interconnected drivable rope guides
US5863029 *Mar 21, 1997Jan 26, 1999Mannesmann AktiengesellschaftSwivelably mounted rope guide for guiding a rope onto and off of a winding drum
US6213674 *Aug 16, 1999Apr 10, 2001Minebea Co., Ltd.Ball joint for a cable
US7861508 *Jul 11, 2006Jan 4, 2011Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd.Cable supporting device
US8141260Feb 9, 2009Mar 27, 2012Lockheed Martin CorporationCable fleet angle sensor
US20090121093 *Jul 11, 2006May 14, 2009Sumitomo Wiring Systems, LtdCable Supporting Device
EP0410041A1 *Jul 28, 1989Jan 30, 1991United Technologies CorporationHelicopter cable and equipment guide
EP1043508B1 *Sep 16, 1999Apr 13, 2005Minebea Co., Ltd.A ball joint for cable guide
Classifications
U.S. Classification254/389, 200/61.18
International ClassificationB64D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB64D1/22
European ClassificationB64D1/22