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Publication numberUS3215472 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateOct 18, 1962
Priority dateOct 21, 1961
Also published asDE1139095B
Publication numberUS 3215472 A, US 3215472A, US-A-3215472, US3215472 A, US3215472A
InventorsHeinz Zahoransky
Original AssigneeZahoransky Anton Fa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brush stuffing machines
US 3215472 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 2, 1965 H. ZAHORANSKY BRUSH STUFFING MACHINES 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 18, 1962 IN VEN TOR. BY He/hz Za/romns/ry MM Nov. 2, 1965' H. ZAHORANSKY 3,215,472

BRUSH STUFFING MACHINES Filed Oct. 18, 1962 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

F/ 6. 2 He/nz Za/romns/ry iLAVM Nov. 2, 1965 H. ZAHORANSKY '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 18, 1962 :WU. H........;

IN VEN TOR. Hem! Za/vomns/ry 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 18, 1962 IN VEN TOR. He/nz Zahorons/ry fi B 4AM Nov. 2, 1965 H. ZAHORANSKY 3,215,472

BRUSH STUFFING MACHINES Filed Oct. 18, 1962 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 F/ 6 7 INVENTOR.

Y He/hz Zahamns/ry Nov. 2, 1965 H. ZAHORANSKY 3,215,472 BRUSH STUFFING MACHINES Filed Oct. 18, 1962 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 I N VE N TOR. He/hz Zohom/ls/ry Nov. 2, 1965 H. ZAHORANSKY 3,215,472

BRUSH STUFFING MACHINES Filed Oct. 18, 1962 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 1N VEN TOR. He/nz Z o/vomns/r y United States Patent 0 17 Ciaims. 51. 300-7 This invention relates to a brush stufiing machine. More particularly, it relates to brush stuffing machines having at least two filler compartments which are alternately brought to and from a desired location for contact with a combination picker, separator and stuffing remover.

The present invention may be used on conventional machines in which compartments of the container are either swung or pivoted into and out of operative position or when the compartments are shuttled back and forth in a straight line movement such as described in the copending application Serial No. 141,097, for Brush Stulfing Machines filed September 27, 1961, now Patent No. 3,128,126, issued April 7, 1964.

In either case the compartments may be arranged horizontally or vertically.

In known machines a locking device closes the bottom of container compartments when not in filler picking position, while a straight or segment-shaped picker selects and separates a bundle of filling material from alternate compartments when in operative position. Stripping or laying aside mechanisms, which may also form the lower locking parts of 'the compartments, are disposed on either side of the bundle picking location. At least one of such locking parts situated between the bundle picking location and the stuffing tool is constructed with either inclined surfaces, bending means, cams and/ or similar devices which forcibly push back the filling material into a compartment when it is removed from the picking position.

Conventional machines operating in the above described manner have numerous disadvantages, notably in the great amount of force or power necessary to completely push back all filling material out of reach of the picker every time a compartment is removed from operative position. This necessary pushing back action occurring constantly with every-displaced movement of the container relative to the picking position impairs the efiiciency and even retards the entire brush stuffing process. The straight line and/ or swiveling movement of the container also creates sidewise pressures in addition to the above described upward pressures of conventional locking devices. Furthermore, the process of pushing filling material back up into the compartment Works in direct opposition to the downward pressures bearing on the material therein which is necessary to discharge a bundle into the picker opening. It is apparent, therefore, that these two counteracting forces, together with a transverse component thereof, lead to undesirable results, especially when used on sensitive filling materials.

For example, it is often observed that round hairs, bristles and synthetic fibres, when under such pressures, roll along the lower closable portion and lateral walls of the compartments to become disarranged and even matted. Further, such strong pressures constantly wear away the smooth point of the laying aside member until it becomes so dull that individual fibers get stuck between it and the bundle separtors or picker. This clogged condition causes a mixing of difierent types of filling material withdrawn from separate compartments to an extent where it is no longer possible to produce brushes of high quality.

An object of the invention is to overcome the above mentioned undesirable results and yet remove filling material beyond the reach'of the bundle picker or separator by safely lifting such material in the compartment without the above mentioned pressures.

Another object of the invention is to devise a means of separating the time period for removing filling material away from the path of the moving bundle separator from the time period required to displace the container So that the two operations are completely independent.

As contemplated by the invention a special device is mounted on the container between the compartments, or if more than two are involved, between the two compartments disposed closest to the stuffing machine. This device lifts the material in one or more compartments to remove such material away from the range of the picker independently of the movement of the container.

Experiments have shown that an arm or a fork disposed on one or both sides of the picker performs most expeditiously not only as a support for the filling material at the lower end of a compartment, but also as a means for lifting such material out of reach of the picker when the compartment is displaced.

An important feature of the invention is the construction of a laying aside member solely for such purpose which results in less wear and tear and longer periods of eflicient operation.

Another important feature of the invention is an independent lifting device so that the container can now be displaced easier and in both directions.

A further feature of the invention is that it affords the use of any type of laying aside member with any type of container displacement means since the lifting device operates independently of both.

A still further feature of the invention is that it lends itself to a choice of pneumatic, hydraulic, electromagnetic or mechanical actuation of the machine. In a pneumatic system, a separate valve for the upward lifting device and another for effecting displacement of the container could be used. Or, a single valve could be used with timing cans to first release the lifting control means and thereafter release the displacement control means.

One form of such timing means in a single or common valve control system comprises a pneumatic or hydraulic cylinder having correspondingly diiierent lengths of conduits to the lifting and displacement means, respectively.

In electric or electromagnetic fully automatic opera tion, the control of switches (as of valves for pneumatic or hydraulic pressure means) can be effected by stop guards, cams and the like which are preferably mounted on the wheel, band belt or other conventional means for controlling the movements of brush stock.

Further features and advantages of the invention will be apparent in the following detail description and the accompanying drawings which illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention, wherein FIG. 1 is a front elevation of a brush stuffing apparatus equipped with a lifting device showing a bundle of filling material being removed from the right compartment of the container;

FIG. 2 is a similar view of the apparatus showing a bundle of material being removed from the left compartment;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal section taken on line 33 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a front elevation of a brush stuffing apparatus showing a modified one-piece displaceable partition;

FIG. 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a similar sectional view to that of FIGS. 3 and 6 showing a modification of the lifting rod and partition;

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of the brush stuffing apparatus showing two separate propulsion cylinders for consecutively lifting the filler material before displacing the container, and one means of regulating the action of said cylinders; and

FIG. 9 is a similar schematic view of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 8, but showing an alternative means of regulating the action of said cylinders.

Referring now to the drawings, a conventional stuffing apparatus or tool 10 is mounted on a support plate 11 of a brush stuffing machine identified generally as 12. A bundle separator or picker 13 moves to and fro in a guide member 14. The picker is provided with an opening 15 into which bundles of filling material are received. The picker runs below, and parallel to a stripper bar or laying aside member 16 which removes any excess filling material from the top of the picker as it passes to and from the stuffing tool.

A container 17 for stuffing material is provided with a central partition 18 and two longitudinal walls 19, 19 which cooperate to form two compartments 20,21, into which different types of stuffing material 22, 23 may be placed. The filler may differ in many respects such as type of bristle, color, tensile strength, etc.

Removable slides or pressing members 24 guided by grooves 25 in the partition and side walls are provided with adjustable weights 26 to maintain a uniform distribution of the material throughout each compartment.

The container is shuttled or pivoted back and forth, by any conventional displacement means as a rod or shaft 27, in opposite directions as indicated by the arrow to allow the picker 13 to alternately take a bundle of stuffing material from each compartment at a specific bundle taking point, here indicated by the illustrated position of opening 15.

In order that the picker may pass easily under the nearest compartment after taking a bundle from the far compartment 21', the stuffing material 22 in compartment is lifted above the reach of the picker by at least one arm 28 of a forked foot 29. This upward lifting of the filler material by the fork upon which it is supported takes place uniformily in a straight vertical line along the longitudinal axis of the compartment. Such clean cut action of the lifting fork in a transverse direction to the movement of the picker reduces friction of the material against the compartment walls to a minimum and thus maintains an orderely placement and uniform gliding of the material from top to bottom during both lifting and bundle removing procedures.

The lifting device indicated generally as 30, of which the foot is a part, also includes a bar or rod 31 to which the foot is attached at the bottom thereof. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 14, rod 31 is adjustable and movable vertically within the front closure 32 of partition 18.

As seen from FIG. 4 the foot may be bent downwardly and outwardly to form two laterally extending arms 28. These arms are so shaped that when compartment 20 is in bundle taking position, the upper surface of the arms is disposed below and clear of the picker to freely allow a bundle of filling material to be deposited in opening 15 and conveyed to the tufting tool 10. In this depressed position the arms span the top of the guide member 14, see also FIG. 2.

The container is shifted to the left towards the stutt ing tool in order that a bundle may be taken from the right hand compartment 21 as illustrated in FIG. 1.

Before the picker returns its opening 15 to its single bundle taking point or position as shown in FIGS. 1 and \2, it is necessary to lift material 22 in compartment 20 not only high enough to avoid any contact with the picker opening, but also beyond any contact with the inclined surface 33 of the stripper or laying aside member 16. By lifting the arms of the foot to the straight upper level of member 16 any possibility of applying uneven or one-sided pressures to material 22 due to inclined surface 33 is completely prevented.

A closed guiding track is required to transport a bundle of tufts from opening 15 to the filling tool 10. One side of the track is formed by the upper edges of guide member 14 and guiding separator needles 13. The other side of the track is formed by the lower surface of stripper bar 16 which preferably presses upon the upper surface of needles 13 by resilient means such as disclosed in the above stated patent.

The inclined surface 33 of bar 16 terminates in a point 33a, proximate opening 15. This point, which extends a short distance into a compartment when in discharging position, has the important function of not only separating the bundle material in opening 15 from that remaining in the compartment, but also from other materials in other compartments. That is, point 33a is essential to prevent unwanted fibers from entering the guide or path between needles 13 and stripper bar 16. Although surface 33 is inclined primarily to form point 33a, it performs a two-fold purpose should any breakdown occur in the lifting mechanism. If cylinder 34, its transmission or lifting foot 29 become defective, slanting surface 33 would allow the machine to continue operating on an emergency basis by taking over the function of pushing the filling material upwardly in the compartment until the lifting device is repaired.

A cylinder 34 is attached to the container 17 above the compartments, see FIG. 4. A reciprocating piston 35 operative in the cylinder by either pneumatic or hydraulic pressure means as indicated in FIGS. 8 and 9, is attached to the head of rod 31 to lift or lower forked foot 29 before each displaced movement of the container.

A piston 36 operative in a second cylinder 37 is connected to rod 27 for displacement of the container. Coordination of the lifting and displacing movements may be effected by any conventional means which opens and closes a single valve 40 to regulate the flow of air or oil, i.e., pneumatic or hydraulic pressure, through a conduit 41, see FIG. 8. The time delay in this onevalve system is effected by a short feed line 42 to cylinder 34 and a longer feed line 43 to cylinder 37.

If preferred, two valves, 44, 45 may be consecutively opened and closed to supply such pressure through separate feed lines 42a, 43a to each cylinder, as illustrated in FIG. 9. In either arrangement, the lifting of the foot is substantially completed before the displacement of the container commences.

When these functions of the machine are to be accomplished electrically the cylinder is replaced by an electromagnet (not shown) which is activated to directly or indirectly lift and lower bar 31 with its forked foot 29.

If it is preferred to control the sequence of these two movements solely by mechanical means, a suitable delay in the actuation of one such movement can be achieved through mechanically operated mechanism.

Where it is possible to place a supporting arm 28 substantially centrally of the compartment underneath the graxity axis of the material being supported therein so that both sides of such material are lifted evenly, only one arm disposed on one side of the picker may be used instead of a fork having arms disposed on both sides of the picker as shown.

The invention is not restricted to the particular embodiment heretofore described and illustrated in FIGS. l-4, especially with respect to the manner of executing several parts thereof. For instance, the connecting member 31 may be constructed and operated differently. Instead of being guidingly movable within grooves 25 of partition 18 as shown in FIGS. 1-4, the partition in whole or in part, such as its front closing portion 32, may be vertically movable and thus simplify the construction of this moving part.

As seen in FIGS. 5 and 8, one end of a movable partition 46 is secured as by a connecting pin 47 to piston 35.

FIG. 7 illustrates the other suggested modification in which the movable part 48 of a partition is slidably mounted on a stationary part 49.

As seen from FIGS. 59 the arms or prongs 28 can be integral with or attached directly to the bottom of a movable partition or a movable part thereof instead of being fitted as a superimposed element on rod 31. Also, one end of the rod may be bent to form one or more transverse arms of the forked foot 29. In all other respects, the operation of movable elements 28, 46 and 48 bear the same relationship to needles 13 and guide member 14 as their counterparts in the FIGS. 1-4 embodiment.

While only a two compartment container is shown in the drawings, it is understood that the lifting device contemplated by the invention is equally adaptable for use on large embodiments. When a larger container is used, the compartments disposed closest the stuffing apparatus or tool are each equipped with a lifting device.

The machine may be operated substantially as follows: In a sample run, compartment 20 is filled with black stuffing material and compartment 21 with white stuffing material. In order to remove black material, the container 17 must be displaced to the right to bring compartment 20 into material discharging position with opening as shown in FIG. 2. In this position foot 29 drops below the level of picker needles 13 to allow bundles of black material 22 to fill opening 15. The size of gap or opening 15 is increased or decreased according to the size of bundle needed to fill the holes in the brush body being fabricated. The movement of needles 13 and gap 15 is synchronized with that of filling tool 10 and during each run it furnishes the appropriate size of bundle to stutf each successive hole according to a prescribed pattern until the last hole in a brush is filled.

At this point an impulse from an automatic mechanism controlling the movement of the boring and filling tools, opens valve 40 and allows fluid pressure to enter into pipe 41. As shown in FIG. 8, pipe 41 flows into a shorter branch 42 and a longer branch 43. Thus the fluid in line 42 enters first into the lower portion of cylinder 34 and presses piston 35 upwards, raising foot 29 connected to rod 31 and the material above arms 28 to a level above surface 33.

After the foot has been raised, the fluid enters via longer line 43 into the rear portion of cylinder 37 and forces piston rod 36 and container 17 towards the filling tool 10 to the position shown in FIG. 1, so that the separating needles 13 now take bundles of white material 23 from compartment 21 in consecutive runs until the holes in the next brush are filled.

The force of the piston must be suflicient to rapidly and reliably raise not only the weight of the filling material resting on arms 28, but also of members 24 and Weights 26, and overcome the frictional resistance of the material against the walls of the compartment.

Material is taken from compartment 21 until it is again necessary to change from White to black material, at which time an impulse is emitted from the control mechanism which now closes valve 40 and opens pipe 41 to release the fluid therein. Thereupon a spring at the top of cylinder 34 presses piston 35 downwardly and returns foot 29 to its lower position. Under pressure of slides 24 and weights 26, material 22 is also pushed downward until it lies on bundle dividing needles 13. Then after the fluid is released from line 43, a similar spring in the front of cylinder 37 returns piston 36 and with it container 17 to their original positions.

A more effective manner of operating pressure cylinders 34 and 37 is obtained by using two valves 45, 44 in feed lines 42a, 430, respectively, as shown in FIG. 9, instead of the single valve 40 as above described.

It is not possible to precisely run the machine with any degree of exactness when only one valve is used. However, when two valves are installed in separate feed lines, the impulses from the control mechanism can execute exact timing of the pistons 35, 36 not only in one direction by fluid pressure, but also in the opposite direction by compression springs when the fluid is released from the cylinders by the automatic closing of valves 45, 44. By such dual valve means, the container 17 can be displaced to the right after the lowering of foot 29, but before weighted slides 24 push material 22 onto the needles 13.

The forms of the invention here described and illustrated are presented merely as examples of how the invention may be embodied and applied. Other forms, embodiments and applications of the invention, coming within the proper scope of the appended claims, will, of course suggest themselves to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In a brush stuffing machine having a stuffing tool and a picker provided with a material receiving opening therein movable from a single material receiving point to said tool, a movable container comprising at least one partition and two compartments, each compartment being adapted to discharge different stuffing material therefrom, said partition being disposed between said compartments, displacement means for moving said container to alternately position each compartment at such material receiving point, a lifting device disposed on said container, and means coaxial with said container and connected to said lifting device for raising said material in at least one of said compartments away from said picker when said one compartment is removed from said material receiving point.

2. A brush making machine according to claim 1 wherein said lifting device operates independently of said displacement means.

3. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 1 wherein said lifting device includes an arm disposed at the bottom of said one compartment to support material contained therein when said one compartment is withdrawn from said point.

4. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 3, wherein said lifting device includes a longitudinal member attached to said arm and a reciprocating means, said reciprocating means being connected to and actuating said member to raise and lower said arm.

5. A brush making machine according to claim 4 wherein said reciprocating means is disposed above said container and is attached to one end of said member.

6. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 4 wherein said partition forms a guide means for said member.

'7. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 4, wherein said member forms at least part of said partition.

8. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 4 wherein one end of said partition is attached to said reciprocating means and the other end is attached to said arm, said partition being actuated to raise and lower said arm before said one compartment is alternately withdrawn from and returned to said material receiving point.

9. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 2 wherein said compartment is withdrawn from said point after said lifting device raises the material supported by said arm.

10. A brush stufling machine according to claim 4 wherein said reciprocating means includes a cylinder disposed above said container and said member is attached to a piston riding in said cylinder.

11. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 10 including a single pneumatic means having a longer and a shorter supply line, said shorter supply line being connected to said reciprocating means and said longer supply line to said displacement means, whereby said container is displaced after said lifting device raises the material in said one compartment withdrawn from said point.

12. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 10 including a single hydraulic means having a longer and a shorter supply line, said shorter supply line being connected to said reciprocating means and said longer supply line to said displacement means, whereby said container is displaced after said lifting device raises the material in said one compartment withdrawn from said point.

13. A brush stufiing machine according to claim 11 wherein said displacement means comprises a second reciprocating means moving in a transverse direction to said first reciprocating. means.

14.'A brush stuffing machine according to claim 4 where said arm comprises a forked foot, one end of said member being attached to said foot and the other end of said member being connected to said first reciprocating means.

15. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 13 wherein said second reciprocating means includes a second cylinder disposed transversely of said first cylinder and said container is connected to a second piston riding in said second cylinder.

16. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 13 including a dual pneumatic means, one of said pneumatic means being connected to said first reciprocating means and the other pneumatic means being connected to said second reciprocating means, and dual time delay means, said time delay means coordinating said pneumatic means to operate said first reciprocating means and lifting device before said second reciprocating and displacement means.

17. A brush stuffing machine according to claim 13 including a dual hydraulic means, one of said hydraulic means being connected to said first reciprocating means and the other hydraulic means being connected to said second reciprocating means, and dual time delay means, said time delay means coordinating said hydraulic means to operate said first reciprocating means before said second reciprocating means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,709,625 5/ 55 Carlson 300-7 3,128,126 4/64 Schnekenburger 3007 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,028,969 4/ 5 8 Germany.

289,674 5/28 Great Britain.

GRANVILLE Y. CUSTER, 111., Primary Examiner.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2709625 *Mar 27, 1951May 31, 1955Carlson Tool & Machine CompanyBrush making machine
US3128126 *Sep 27, 1961Apr 7, 1964Zahoransky Anton FaBrush stuffing machines
DE1028969B *Sep 3, 1955Apr 30, 1958Zahoransky Anton FaVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Zufuehren von Borstenbuendeln bei Buersten-Herstellungsmaschinen
GB289674A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4360236 *Mar 24, 1980Nov 23, 1982Firma G.B. Boucherie, Naamloze VennootschapDouble fibre magazine for brush manufacturing machines
US6079788 *Aug 18, 1998Jun 27, 2000G. B. Boucherie N.V.Device for removing individual fiber tufts from up to three fiber bins of a brush making machine
US6227735Aug 10, 1995May 8, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6296411Jan 5, 2001Oct 2, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6299370Jan 5, 2001Oct 9, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6299371Jan 5, 2001Oct 9, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6305862Jan 5, 2001Oct 23, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6309123Jan 5, 2001Oct 30, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6325562Jan 5, 2001Dec 4, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6331086Jan 5, 2001Dec 18, 2001L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
US6345923Jan 5, 2001Feb 12, 2002L'orealMake-up brush and method for manufacturing such a brush
Classifications
U.S. Classification300/7
International ClassificationA46D3/00, A46D3/04, A46D3/08
Cooperative ClassificationA46D3/082, A46D3/042
European ClassificationA46D3/04B, A46D3/08B