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Publication numberUS3215501 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1965
Filing dateFeb 2, 1962
Priority dateFeb 2, 1962
Publication numberUS 3215501 A, US 3215501A, US-A-3215501, US3215501 A, US3215501A
InventorsPhillips James M
Original AssigneeSalem Brosius Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable components of efflux
US 3215501 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. M. PHILLIPS 3,2l5,50l

OXIDIZING Nov. 2, 1965 APPARATUS FOR SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLETELY OXIDIZABLE COMPONENTS OF EFFLUX 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 2, 1962 Mit 702 MES M PH/LUPS %4, Wu

x xxx/xx 3,215,50l ZING J. M. PHILLIPS Nov. 2, 1965 APPARATUS FOR SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLETELY OXID OXIDIZABLE COMPONENTS OF EFFLUX 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 2, 1962 /NVENTOR %MES M. PH/LL/Pf United States Patent O 3,215,501 APPARATUS FOR SUBSTANTIALLY COIWPLETELY OXIDIZING OXIDIZABLE COMPONENTS OF EFFLUX James M. Phillips, Bridgeville, Pa assignor to Salem- Brosius, Inc., Carnegie, Pa., a Corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Feb. 2, 1962, Ser. No. 170,753 5 Claims. (Cl. 23-277) This invention relates to apparatus for substantially completely oXidizing oxidizable Components of efilux. The invention has particular utlity in minimizing the discharge of dirty smoke and noxious fumes from the stacks of industrial plants.

The word eflluX is used herein as a term of broad defim'tion and means any product, usually a by-product, of an industrial process which contains oxidizable components in either gaseous or solid form. Examples of industrial processes to the efilux of which my apparatus is well adapted are coking and distillation processes. In these and other industrial processes effiuX is formed which always comprses gaseous material and generally also comprses solid material. By way of example, a coking process may be considered. In a coking process the efilux derives from combustion of coal whereby volatile matter is driven off. Such efilux contains both gaseous and solid matter. At least a considerable proportion of the solid material is oxidizable. Also a substantial part of the gaseous matter may be oxidizable. The solid oxidizable matter should be substantially completely oxidized to minimize the emission of solids into the atmosphere. The gaseous oxidizable matter should b substantially completely oxidized because of the noxious nature thereof (example: carbon monoxde) and the fact that incompletely oxidized gaseous Components of the elux may react to form solids which are emitted to the atmosphere.

Various attempts to oXidize oXidizable Components of effiux have been made but none has been fully satisfactory. It is common in cupola practice to discharge a jet of air into the upper portion of the cupola for the purpose of oxidizing oxidizable matter passing to the stack but there is no control and no provision for reaching with the jet all or even a considerable part 'of the oxidizable Components passing toward the stack. As a result the practical elfect of the jet in cupola practice is slight and it does not prevent or minimize emission of unoxidized matter into the atmosphere.

Three -factors are important to optimum oxidizing of oxidizable Components of efiiux, to wit, time, temperature and turbulence. Considering these factors in inverse order, effective oxidation cannot be accomplished unless the oxidizing atmosphere is brought into intimate contact with virtually all portions of the oxidizable components of the efilux. This is accomplished by creating turbulence to avoid stratfication of the efflux or the oxidizing atmosphere and to cause the oxidizing atmosphere to be thoroughly and intimately admixed with the efilux. The next factor is temperature; the oxidizable Components of the efux must be subjected to temperature sufficent to substantially completely oXidize them. But substantially complete oxidation will not occur unless the oxidizable components of the efiiux are maintained at a temperature sufiicient to substantially completely oxidize such Components for a time sufficient for substantially complete oxidation thereof. Thus it is important, first that the oxidizable components of the effiux be thoroughly and intimately intermixed with the oxidizing atmosphere throughout so that all portions of the oxidizable Components will be afiected, second that the oxidizable Components be subjected to tempera- 3,215501 Patented Nov. 2, 1965 ture suficent to substantially completely oxidze them, and, third, that such componeuts be subjected to such temperature for a time sufiicient for substantially complete oxidation to take place.

My apparatus is designed to recognize the three requirements above enumerated and provides for the first time, so far as I am aware, means for the effective and substantially complete oxidation of oxidizable components of efilux.

If the chamber in which the oxidation is taking place is comparatively small so that the oxidizing atmosphere perforce intimately engages all portions -of the oXidizable Components of the efllux without the necessity of any special provision for creating turbulence the factor of turbulence may be of minimal importance and may be met by the special conditions existing. However, when the oxidation occurs in a chamber of substantial' size special provisons should be made to efiect turbulence for the obtaining of optimum results.

I provide apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxdzable components of elux which comprses surface heated to a temperature suflicient to substantially completely oXidize such Components, means for conducting efilux containing oxidizable Components into contact with such surface in an oxidizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintain it in contact with such surface for a time sufiicient for substantially complete oxidation of such Components. In the great majority of cases, as above indicated, means should be provided for subjecting efllux containing oX- dizable Components to turbulent action in an oxidzing atmosphere so that the oxidizing atmosphere effectively Contacts all portions of the oxidizable components of the efilux.

The means controlling the movement of the efiiux to maintain the oxidzable Components thereof in contact with the heated surface for a time suicient for substantially complete oxidation of such Components may take various forms, such as means controlling the rate of delivery of efflux and/or of oxidizing atmosphere to the zone of admixing thereof and/or meansfor controlling the rate of outflow of the products. Also the specific form of the means for conducting the inflow and outflow of the effiux, oxidiziug atmosphere and products affects the turbulence factor. Such means are designed to con trol such flows so that the turbulence and time at temperature are optimum.

The heated surface is preferably comprised of contact elements presenting great surface area heated to a temperature suicient to substantially completely oxidize the -oxidizable Components of the efllux, and the flow controlling means are, as has been stated, so designed and constructed as to maintain such Components in contact with such elements for a time sufcient for substantially complete oxidation thereof.

The contact elements presenting great surface area may assume a variety of forms. I find that a so-called grid tile made by a prominent manufacturer serves the purpose excellently. According to the manufacturer this is a grid type packing which offers the maximum effective surface possible in ceramic material. The total effective surface per cubic foot is said to be 34.09 square feet and a checker arrangement built up of the grid tiles is said to have an effective surface area of 22 square feet per cubic foot. Numerous other commercial products may serve the purpose or a checkerwork of brick such as is used in a regenerative open hearth furnace may be employed or even a mass of broken bricks or shapes. What is important in this connection is that great surface area be presented to the admixture of oxidizing atmosphere and efiiux so that all portions of the oxidizable compc nents of the efflux are subjected to temperature sufficient to substantially completely oxidize such Components by being in intimate surface contact with the hot contact elements.

In a more specific aspect my invention contemplates apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable components, including solid oxidizable components, of eiux which comprises gaseous material in addtion to the solid oxidizable Components, the apparatus comprising a zone containing contact elements presenting great surface area, such contact elements being heated to a temperature sufiicient to substantially completely oxidize such Components, means for conducting efilux containing oxidizable Components including solid oxidizable components into said zone into contact with said elements in an oxidizing atmosphere whereby to deposit at least the greater portion of the solid oxidizable Components on such elements and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintain the solid oxidizable Components deposited on such elements for a time sufiicient for substantially complete oxidation of such Components.

The apparatus may comprise a first zone, means for conducting efilux containing oxidizable Components into said first zone in an oxidizing atmosphere so that in such first zone such oxidizable Components are oxidized to a substantial extent while a portion thereof remains incompletely oxidized, a second Zone containing contact elements presenting great surface heated to a temperature sufiicient to substantially completely oxidize the incompletely oxidized portion of the efilux, means for conducting the efflux, including the incompletely oxidized portion thereof, in an oxidizing atmosphere from the first zone into the second zone in which the efilux is in contact with said elements and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintain the ncompletely oxidized portion thereof in contact with said elements for a time suicient for substantially' complete oxidation thereof. Means should be provided for subjecting the eiux containing oxidizable Components to turbulent action for the purpose described above. Such means should be designed to initiate the turbulent action in the first zone and such action should be continued in the second zone.

While it is contemplated that normally the oxidizable Components of the efilux will be incompletely oxidized in a first zone and the oxidation thereof substantially completed in a second zone, I wish not to rule out the possibility that under certain circumstances the oxidizable components of the efllux may be substantially completely oxidized in the initial zone, and it is possible that if such a situation exists an apparatus may be utilized in which the method is carried out completely in a single zone, the chamber Walls and/or any other surface which may be provided therein constituting the heated surface above referred to. Such an arrangement would be indicated when the oxidizable Components of the efllux are of such nature that substantially complete oxidation thereof may be efected at a comparatively low temperature.

In a further aspect my invention may comprise apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable Components of efflux 'comprising surface heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially completely oxidize such Components, means for admixing effiux containing oxidizable Components with gaseous material to promote high temperature of the efflux in an oxidizing atmosphere, means conducting the admixture in the oxidizing atmosphere into contact with said surface and means controlling the movement of the admixture to maintain it in contact With such surface for a time sufficient for substantially complete oxidation of such Components. The gaseous material may be natural or other gas to be burned in intimate association with the efiiux or it may be air to supply oxygen for combustion or it may be both such gas and such air. In the starting up of a process the addition of combustible gas may be required but after the process has gotten well under way an excess of oxidizable Components may be given ofi requiring the introduction of air to supply oxygen for combustion or oxidation. Therefore, the apparatus should be designed and constructed to provide for the introduction of combustible gas at one time and oxygen at another time, suitable valving or other means for selectively introducing combustible gas and oxygen, or introducing both together, preferably being provided.

The surface heated to a temperature sutlicient to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable Components of the efilux is heated by the products of the efiux and gaseous material so that in general the same medium supplies the heat to the surface as is oxidized by contact with the surface.

I may provide means for conducting to the first zone of my apparatus in an oxidizing atmosphere effiux from different sources of different temperatures and containing -diiferent proportions of oxidizable Components, means subjecting the admixture to turbulent action to promote homogeneity and uniformity of temperature throughout the admixture, the second zone containing surface heated to a temperature suflicient to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable Components of the efflux, means for conducting the admixture from the first zone to the second zone into contact with said surface in an oxi dizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the admixture to maintain it in contact with such surface for a time sufiicient for substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable Components of the effiux. Such apparatus is especially well adapted for substantially completely oxidizing the oxidizable Components of effiux derived from a continuous coking process such -as is carried out on a continuously moving rotary hearth. As the coking process proceeds the efilux in different zones has different temperatures and different proportions of oxidizable components. In the earlier zones the temperature is relatively low and the proportion of oxidizable components is relatively high. Subsequently the temperature increases and the proportion of oxidizable components decreases. Still later the temperature decreases while the proportion of oxidizable components continues to decrease. When elux from the various zones of a rotary hearth furnace is admixed the higher temperature eiux containing the lower proportion of oxidizable components helps to raise the temperature of and oxidize the greater proportion of oxidizable Components delivered at a lower temperature from .another zone. In such admixing turbulence is highly important.

I may contribute to the turbulent action of the efiiux in the mixing zone by providing means for imparting generally helical action to the efilux as it is delivered to that zone. I may provide the duct through which the efflux is delivered with helically arranged inwardly projecting baflle's which may be formed by bricks or ceramic or other shapes.

Desirably the mixing zone is generally circular and means are provided for admitting the gaseous material to be admixed with the elux generally tangentially into said Zone to cause the efllux to swirl turbulently in an oxidizing atmosphere to promote homogereity and uniformity of temperature thereof.

I preferably provide means for injecting gaseous material under pressure which may be controlled so as to insure maintaining the oxidizable Components of the efiiux in contact with the heated surface for a time sufficient for substantially complete oxidation of such Components. I may also provide means for admitting supplemental air generally tangentially into the mixing zone to contribute to the turbulent swirling of the efilux and to the attaining of optimum temperature. Desirably a series of generally tangentially arranged pressure nozzles and a series of generally tangentially arranged supplemental air inlets controlled by suitable butterfiy or other valves are pr-ovided so that a desired quantity of gas and/or air may be injected tangentially under pressure and/ or a desirecl quantty of air may be admitted to be drawn through the efiiux by the stack draft or other means whereby the products are advanced.

I desirably provide draft producing means for withdrawing the products together with means whereby the magnitude of the draft may be controlled to promote substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable components of the efiiux. The greater the magnitude of the draft the faster the products a-dvance toward the stack -or other outlet. I may make provsion for controlling the time of contact of the oxidizable components with the heated surface to promote substantially complete oxidation of such components by diminishing the magnitude of the draft in the stack or other outlet by imposing thereon a counterdraft. This will be done in the event that the draft tends to withdraw the products too quickly to perm'it of 'substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable components of the efilux. I may provide means for creating the counterdraft by the injection -of gaseous material into the stack or to the outlet so as to have a Component of movement opposite the direction of the draft. I find it preferable to use a fairly high stack in which a natural draft as great as will ever be required is created and to counteract the natural draft to the optimum extent by a counterdraft. The resultant draft in the stack or other outlet and the inlet pressure of gaseous material above referred to cooperate in determining the time of contact of the oxidizable components with the heated surface.

Of course, the oxidizable components of the efilux must attain ignition temperature before such components can be substantially completely oxidized. Normally the eiux, including any supplemental air and/or products of combustion, will have attained igniti on temperature by the time the oxidizable components reach the heated surface. However, under certain conditions the efiiux may be at a temperature somewhat below ign'ition temperature when it reaches the heated surface. Even under such a condition the combustion of the efilux may be sufficient to maintain the heated surface at the temperature required to substantially completely -oxidize the oxidiza ble components of the efflux if the combustion reaction is exothermic.

Other details, objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the following description of a present preferred embodiment thereof proceeds.

In the accompanying drawings I have shown a present preferred embodiment of the invention in which FIGURE l is a vertical cross-sectional view, with portions -cut away, through apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable components of elux taken on the line I-I of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 2 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line II-II of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken On the line III-III of FIGURE l FIGURE 4 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line IV-IV of F IGURE 1; and

FIGURE 5 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line V-V of FIGURE 1.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, there is shown apparatus which may be employed in practicing the invention and in which oxidizable components of effiux may be substantially completely oxidized. I provide a generally circular chamber designated generally by reference numeral 2 constituted by a floor 3, a roof 4 and a generally upright generally cylindrical wall 5 all of which are prefera'bly formed of refractory material which may be either monolithically cast or built up out of bricks or shapes. Efiiux containing oxidizable components is introduced into the chamber 2 through one or more ducts 6. In the structure shown in the drawings there happen to be four ducts 6 each oriented generally radially of the chamber 2 and opening thereinto. Such an arrangement would be typical of apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable components of products of combustion emanating from the generally annular cokng chamber of a continuous rotary hearth coke oven. In such an oven the products of combustion delivered from different zones therearound are at different temperatures and have different proportions of oxidizable components The products of combustion or other efux admx in the chamber 2 which may be designated a mixing chamber. Considerable turbulence is created by the impingement against one another of the various streams of efilux entering the mixing chamber from the ducts 6. However, in other applications there may be only one duct 6. To promote or insure turbulence in the mixing chamber I desirably impart generally helical action to the eiflux as it s delivered to the heating chamber. This may be done by forming helically arranged inwardly projecting bafes 7 in the ducts 6, which baffies may be formed by bricks or ceramic or other shapes. Each duct may have one or more such bafiies. I find it desirable to provide four such baies in each duct, the bafiles being spaced apart. The effect of the helical `bafiies is to cause the efflux as it enters the chamber 2 to whirl or swirl in generally helical form, substantially contributing to the turbulence in the chamber.

I also provide jets or nozzles or burners 8 opening generally tangentially into the chamber 2. Any suitable number of such jets may be employed. I find that good results are obtained by using four such jets. The jets inject gaseous material under pressure into the chamber 2 causing a swirling of the material within the chamber and thereby effecting the desirable turbulence and bringing the injected gaseous material into intimate substantially homogeneous contact with the efflux.

The gaseous material injected through the jets 8 may be natural or other gas to be burned in intimate association with the efiiux or it may be air to supply oxygen for com'bustion or it may be both such gas and such air. Desirably both gas and air connections are made to'cach jet with valves which may 'be controlled at will so that all gas or all air or a mixture of gas and air may 'be injected. Gas may be introduced .at sa and air at 8b. Normally, in the early stages of a process before optimum temperature has been attained it will be desirable to inject gas to be burned to raise the temperature in the chamber. After the process has gotten well under way the gas may be shut off and air to support combustion may 'be injected. The efiiux in the chamber is simultaneously subjected to turbulent whirling action and to intimate association with burning gas or oxygen supporting oxidation of oxidizable components of the efiiux.

I also provide for the generally tangential admission to the chamber 2 of supplemental air through passages 9 whch may lead to the atmosphere outside t-he apparatus and the fiow of air through which may be controlled by 'any suitable type of valve 10. The draft within the chamber will draw air in through the passages 9 to Supplement the material otherwise introduced into the chamber.

The action in the chamber 2 of the materials above described causes oxidation of oxidizable components of the effiux. While conditions are created and maintained in the chamber to oxidize such components as efliciently as possible the time and temperature factors in the chamber 2 as described above are such that a portion of the oxidizable components of the efilux is incompletely oxidized in that chamber.

The products pass upwardly from the chamber or zone 2 through ports 11 in the roof 4 into a second chamber or zone 12 containing surface heated to a temperature sufiicient to substantially completely oxidze the oxidizable components of the effiux. The surface in the chamber 12 is designated generally by reference numeral 13 and prefera'bly constitutes contact elements presenting great surface area, such, for example, as grid tile as described above and/ or checkerwork or a mass of broken bricks or shapes or any other arrangement which atfords great sur- 'Z face area to be contacted by the products passing from the chamber 2 to the chamber 12. In the drawings the lower portion of the surface 13 is constituted by interfitting refractory shapes 13a With a grid 13b disposed thereabove. In the chamber 12 the products are caused to contact the heated surface and are maintained in contact therewith for a period of time sufficient for substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable Components of the efflux. The products passing from the chamber 2 to the chamber 12 impart the heat to the surface 13 in the chamber 12 which 'brings about the oxidation in that chamber.

Above the chamber 12 is a stack 14 and at the base of the stack connecting the stack with the chamber 12 is a generally concal connecting portion 15. The stack is preferably made high enough to draw a natural draft through the chambers 2 and 12 as great as will ever be required. 'Control of that draft as will presently be described in connection with control of the gaseous material injected and/ or admitted generally tangentially into the chamber 2 determines the speed of movement of the products past or through the surface 13. Those factors are adjusted or controlled so that the products move in contact with the surface 13 at such a speed that the incompletely oxidized oxidizable Components of the efllux will remain in contact with that surface for a period of time sufi'icient to substantially completely oxidize the same. Solid oxidizable particles in the efllux are deposited on the surface 13 where they are subjected to the requisite temperature to substantially completely oxidize them until oxidation is substantially complete and such particles are transformed into products in gaseous form.

To counteract and reduce the magnitude of the upward draft through the stack 14 when required I provide a bustle pipe 16 around the stack having nozzles or openings 17 directed inwardly and downwardly. A blower 18 is connected with the bustle pipe 16 by a pipe 19. the flow of air through the pipe 19 being controlled by a valve 20. The position of the valve 20 is determined by automatic pressure control means 21 which may be of conventional design connected with the stack so that when ta predetermined stack draft is exceeded (which is accompanied by the drawing through the apparatus of an excess Volume of efllux and/ or gaseous material) air is delivered by the blower 18 through the pipe 19 and the bustle pipe 16 and is ejected through the nozzles 17 inwardly and downwardly so as to have a component of movement downwardly or opposite the upward direction of the draft. By such means a generally uniform draft and consequently a generally unifiorm flow of products upwardly through the chambers 2 and 12 and in contact With the surface 13 may be realized.

The products passing out through the stack are substanially completely oxidized so that a minimum of black solids and also a minimum of noxious fumcs are ejected. I am enabled to control the oxidizing effect by the various control factors above disclosed so as to closely approach perfectly complete oxidation of all oxidizable Components of the efflux.

While I have illustrated and described a present preferred method of practicing the invention and -one form of apparatus upon which the invention may be practiced it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but may be otherwise variously practiced within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable Components of efux comprising a first chamber, means for conducting efilux containing oxidizable components to said finst chamber, means for subjecting such efilux to turbulent action in an oxidizing atmosphere in said first chamber, means for imparting generally helical action to the efilux as it is delivered to said first chamber, contributing to the turbulent action of the efilux in said chamber, a second chamber, surface heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable Components of the efilux disposed in said second chamber, means for conducting the efilux from the first chamber to the second chamber into contact with said surface in ;an oxidizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintain it in contact With such surface for a time sufficient for substantially complete oXida-tion of the oxidizable Components of the efflux.

2. Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable Components of efllux comprising a genenally circular chamber, means for conducting effiux containing oxidizable Components to said chamber, means for admitting gaseous material generally tangentially into said chamber to cause the efilux to swirl turbulently in said chamber in an oxidizing atmosphere to promote homogeneity and uniformity of temperature thereof, a second chamber, surface heated to a temperature sufficent to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable components of the elux disposed in said second chamber, means for conducting the turbulently swirling effiux from the generally circular chamber to the second chamber into contact with said surface in an oxdizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the efllux to maintain it in contact with such surface for a time sufficent for substantially complete oxdation of the oxidizable components of the efilux.

3. Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable Components of effiux comprisug a generally cir- -cular chamber, means for conducting effiux containing oxidizable Components to said chamber, means for admitting gaseous material generally tangentially into said chamber to cause the efilux to swirl turbulently in said chamber in an oxidizing atmosphere to promote homogeneity and uniformity of temperature thereof, means for imparting generally helical action to the efllux as it is delivered to said generally circular chamber, contributing to the turbulent action of the elux in said chamber, a second chamber, surface heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable components of the efilux disposed in said second chamber, means for conducting the turbulently swirling effiux from the generally circular chamber to the second chamber into contact with said surface in an oxidizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintain it in contact with such surface for a time sufllcient for substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable Components of the efllux.

4. Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizng oxidizable Components of efilux comprising a generally circular chamber, means for conducting to said .chamber in an oxidizing atmosphere efilux from different sources of different temperatures and containing different proportions of oxidizable Components, means for admitting gaseous material generally tangentially into said chamber to cause the efflux to swirl turbulently in said chamber to promote homogeneity and uniformity of temperature throughout the admixture, means for imparting generally helical action to the efilux from at least certain of said sources as it is delivered to said generally circular chamber, contributing to the turbulent action of the efilux in said chamber, a second chamber, surface heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially completely oxidize the oxidizable Components of the efilux disposed in said second chamber, means for conducting the turbulently swirling admixture from the generally circular chamber to the second chamber into contact with said surface in an oxidizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the admixture to maintain it in contact With such surface for a time suicient for substantially complete oxidation -of the oxidizable components of the elux.

5. Apparatus for substantially completely oxidizing oxidizable Components of efllux comprising a generally circular chamber, means for conducting efflux containing oxidizable Components to said chamber, means for njecting gaseous material under pressure generally tan gentially into said chamber to cause the efflux to swirl turbulently in said chamber in an oxidzng atmosphere to promote homogenety and uniformity of temperature thereof, means for admitting supplemental air generally tangentially into said chamber to contribute to the turbulent swrling of the efilux in said chamber and to the attainng of optimum temperature therein, a second chamber, surface heated to a temperature suflcent to substantially completely oxidize the oxdzable components of the elux dsposed in said `second chamber, means for conducting the turbulently swirlng efl'lux from the generally crcular chamber to the second chamber into contact with said surface in an oxidizing atmosphere and means controlling the movement of the efilux to maintan it in contact with such surface for a time suflicent for substantially complete oxidation of the oxidizable Components of the efflux.

References Cited by the Examier UNITED STATES PATENT S MORRIS O. WOLK, Pr'mary Exam'ner.

MAURICE A. BRINDISI, Exam'ner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification422/170, 110/160, 422/183, 422/176, 110/213, 422/175
International ClassificationF23G7/06, B01D53/34
Cooperative ClassificationF23G7/065, B01D53/34
European ClassificationB01D53/34, F23G7/06B3