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Publication numberUS3216376 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1965
Filing dateDec 15, 1961
Priority dateDec 15, 1961
Publication numberUS 3216376 A, US 3216376A, US-A-3216376, US3216376 A, US3216376A
InventorsDonald E Anderson, Donald E Christensen
Original AssigneeWeyerhaeuser Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pallet
US 3216376 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 9, 1965 D. E. ANDERSON ETAL 3,216,376

PALLET Filed Dec. 15, 1961 IN V EN TORS' DONALD E. ANDEQQON BYDONALD E. CHQISTENSEN W W United States Patent 3,216,376 PALLET Donald E. Anderson, Tacoma, Wash, and Donald E.

Christensen, Marshfield, Wis., assignors to Weyerhaeuser Company, Tacoma, Wash, a corporation of Washington Filed Dec. 15, 1961, Ser. No. 159,700 9 Claims. (Ci. Mitt-56) This invention relates to a shipping pallet which may be assembled and disassembled easily so that it will occupy a minimum amount of space when not in use.

The normal practice in present day material handling is to place the material on a lift truck pallet so that a greater quantity of material may be handled at one time, thus reducing the unit material handling cost. Usually these pallets are of wood construction since wood is a material that is economical and has good load-bearing characteristics. To realize maximum economy, the pallets are reused a number of times requiring, in many instances, that a carload of empty pallets be returned to the shipping point. The costs of this return transportation are high because these costs are fixed at the potential weight that can be carried by the car rather than the actual Weight of the pallets.

These return transportation costs may be eliminated by using an expendable pallet. This type of pallet, which is destroyed after a single use, utilizes corrugated board for all, or at least the major portion, of its component parts, and quite often utilizes wooden blocks for the loadbearing members. One of the drawbacks to this type of pallet is its high unit cost caused by its single use. Another drawback is the diificulty of assembling and disassembling the pallet if reuse is attempted.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet or" the expendable type which may be reused a number of times.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet which may be assembled and disassembled easily and which will occupy a minimum amount of space when not in use.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet which may be assembled and disassembled easily without the use of additional fastening members.

It is another object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet of the expendable type having reinforcing channel-shaped weight-bearing members.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet having weight-bearing members which may be placed fiat when not in use and may be formed into a channeLshaped configuration in the assembled pallet.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a pallet in which the weight-bearing members are braced by transverse members.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet of the expendable type in which the weightbearing members of the pallet are braced into a channel configuration by transverse members.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a shipping pallet of the expendable type in which the weightbearing members also serve as a guide for the forks on a lift truck.

These and other objects of this invention will become readily apparent upon a reading of the following specification in conjunction with the attached drawings.

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of a blank for the weightbearing member.

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of a blank for the corrugated board transverse member.

FIGURE 3 is an isometric view with portions cut away showing the method of assembling the pallet and details of the bracing of the pallet.

FIGURE 4 is an isometric view of the assembled pallet.

The present invention, shown in FIGURE 4, proposes a shipping pallet of the expendable type which may be used a number of times and in which a pair of channelshaped, weight-bearing members 119 are held in a predetermined, spaced relationship by a pair of corrugated board transverse members 120. It further proposes a shipping pallet 10th of the expendable type in which the normally fiat weight-bearing members are confined in their channel-shaped configuration by the transverse members 120. No additional fastening members are needed for the construction of the pallet. Thus, the pallet is constructed so that it may be placed in a flat condition when not in use. Since the disassembled fiat pallet requires only a fraction of the space required by the assembled pallet, its unit cost for storage and return transportation is at a minimum because of its smaller space requirements.

This space requirement difference is demonstrated in FIGURES 1 and 3. FIGURE 1, which shows the blank 1% of weight-bearing member 110 with its top face extending into the page, may also be considered as a view of weight-bearing member 110 in its disassembled flat condition. As implied, in this condition member 110, having a pair of legs 11 hingedly connected at 12 to an upper wall 13, is fiat, and the legs 11 are in the same plane as wall 13. However, in the assembled pallet, shown in FIGURE 3, member lit is channel shaped with legs 11 being normal to wall 13 so that member 110 may act as a guide for the fork of a lift truck and legs 11 may support the load on the pallet. If member 110 were to be stored in this latter configuration, the space encompassed by the channel would be wasted and for this reason it is desirable to utilize such space by placing member 110 in a flat condition when not in use.

In order to flatten member 110 easily, it is necessary to have a hinged joint 12. The construction of this joint will depend in great part on the type of material used. The preferred material, and the one illustrated, is a woodpaper laminate having a wood veneer core faced with sheets of kraft paper. However, it is permissible to use other types of core materials and other typs of facing materials. It is also permissible to use a single material having taped hinge joints. It is required that one of the materials used have good load-bearing characteristics. With the preferred wood-paper laminate material, the hinge joints 12 are formed by extending V grooves, normally having sides extending at a 45 angle to the plane of the blank, through the veneer and one of the outer faces, and allowing the other paper face to form the hinge. The hinge 12 allows member 110 to be changed between its flat configuration and its channel-shaped configuration a number of times, so it is desirable that no internal fastening members, such as nails, be used to hold member 110 in its channel-shaped configuration. Therefore it is preferred that external bracing members he used to retain member 110 in its channel-shaped configuration within pallet ltlil.

This is one of the functions of transverse member 120. This member is formed from a blank 20, shown in FIG- URE 2, which is divided by score lines 21, 22, 23, and 24 into an outer first end wall section 30, a top wall 40, a second end wall 50, a bottom wall 60, and an inner first end wall section 70. There are a number of flaps formed in the end walls and the top wall to space and brace channel-shaped members 110.

As shown in FIGURE 3, members 110 are inserted into member 121 through apertures 35 of first end Wall St). The Wall is formed by first end Wall sections 30 and '70, and its apertures 85 are formed by the internal bracing elements 73 in end wall section 70 and the bracing flaps 33 and 35 in end wall section 39.

As may be seen in FIGURE 2, the inner bracing flaps 33 of end wall section 30 are hingedly connected to a central glue flap 31 along score lines 32, and the outer bracing flaps 35 are hinge-dly connected to a pair of outer glue flaps 37 along score lines 36. It is preferred that bracing flaps 33 and 35 abut each other along slit 34 and abut top wall 4% along a slit in score line 21.

Flaps 33 and 35 extend into the assembled transverse member 120, FIGURE 3, through inner slots 72 and outer slots 77 of end wall section '70 to form the side walls of aperture 85. Slots '72 and 7'7, which separate the internal bracing elements 73 from the central glue flap 71 and the outer glue flaps 78, are as wide as the combined thickness of a flap, 33 or 35, and a leg 11 of member 110 so that both a flap and a leg 11 may pass through each slot in the assembled pallet.

During the assembly of transverse member 120, the central glue flaps 71 and 31 are adhered together forming a central section 81, and the outer glue flaps 78 and 37 are adhered together forming outer sections 82 of first end wall 80 of transverse member 120. This member may, like member 110, be placed in flat condition when not in use by placing the flaps 33 and 35 and the elements 73 in the planes of their respective wall sections and flattening the tubular member 120 along either score lines 21 and 23, or 22 and 24.

The flaps 33 and 35 and the elements 73 have, in addition to their function of providing an aperture in the transverse member 119, an additional function of bracing members 119 and 120. For this latter purpose, each internal bracing element 73 fits snugly within and locks frictionally between legs 11 of a channel-shaped member 116 to space and brace the lower sections of legs 11 in each member 110. To facilitate the internal placement and frictional locking of element 73 within channelshaped member 110, each element '73 is divided into a lower section 74 and an upper section 76 by a score line 75 which is preferably parallel to score line 24. Thus, element '73 may be bent, along score lines 24 and 76, inwardly of member 110 into the position shown in FIGURE 3. In this position, it is beyond its apex and will not spring back to its original position after frictionally locking against the inner faces of legs 11.

The legs 11 are prevented from rotating outwardly of member 110 by the external bracing of central and outer wall sections 81 and 82 and their associated flaps 33 and 35 which form the aperture 35. This aperture is the size of a channel-shaped member 110, and, therefore, holds the member 110 in its channel-shaped configuration and prevents legs 11 from rotating outwardly. The inner legs 11 of the two members 110 are also held in place by top wall flaps 41 and 43. These last-mentioned flaps are formed centrally of top wall 40, are hingedly connected to top wall 40 along score lines 42 and 44, which are preferably parallel to score lines 21 and 22, and are of a width such that they fit frictionally between the pair of members 110.

The bracing of member 110 is in conjunction with the bracing of member 120. For this latter purpose, flaps 33 and 35, which fit frictionally between the top and bottom walls, and flaps 41 and 43 serve as spacer elements between top and bottom walls 40 and 60 of member 120. To perform this function, flaps 33 and 41 are, in the preferred form, shaped and spaced, so as to form a hexahedronal box beam member 90. Thus, each slit 34, defining the outer side edge of each flap 33, slants diagonally so that flap 33 forms a trapezoid having its base edge 38 adjacent top wall 40; and score line 42 of flap 41 is spaced from score line 21 a distance equal to the length of base edge 38. This construction allows flap 41 to bend inwardly beyond its apex until it abuts the outer side edge of flap 33 and to lock frictionally against bottom wall 60. The hexahedronal box beam member 90 thus formed by flaps 33 and flap 41, wall section 81 and walls 40 and 6t) braces both the top and bottom walls 40 and 4 60 of member 120 and the legs of weight-bearing members 110.

Members are also braced internally by flaps 53 and 55 in end wall 50. Flaps 53, which are hinged to a central wall section 51 along score line 52, and flaps 55, which are hinged to the outer wall sections 57 along score lines 56, extend internally of member 110 in the finished pallet, and lock frictionally against the inner faces of bottom wall 60 and upper wall 13. Since these flaps extend internally rather than externally of members 11!), score lines 52 and 56 are aligned with the inner faces of legs 11. The ends of legs 11 are braced internally by fiaps 53 and 55 and externally by flap 4-3.

As may be seen, members 110 are completely braced into their channel shaped by members in the assembled pallet, and are not braced when removed from the pallet so that they may be fiat when stored. This change between the channel shape and the flat shape of member 110 may be accomplished a number of times because the hinge joints 12 are not nailed or otherwise fixed in place.

While specific details of a preferred embodiment has been set forth above, it will be apparent that many changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention. It will therefore be understood that what has been described herein is intended to be illustrative only, and is not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A pallet comprising a pair of channel-shaped weight-bearing members having downwardly extending legs hingedly connected and substantially perpendicular to an upper wall,

a transverse member extending over said weight-bearing members, spacing said weight-bearing members and preventing inward and outward rotation of said legs with respect to said upper wall,

said transverse member comprising top and bottom walls having end walls extending therebetween,

said weight-bearing members extending through apertures in an end wall of said transverse member,

said transverse member having a panel extending inwardly of said weight-bearing member preventing inward rotation of said legs.

2. A pallet comprising a pair of channel-shaped weight-bearing members having downwardly extending legs hingedly connected to an upper wall,

a transverse member extending over said weight-bearing members, spacing said Weight-bearing members and preventing inward and outward rotation of said legs with respect to said upper wall,

said transverse member comprising top and bottom walls having end walls extending therebetween,

said weight-bearing members extending through apertures in end wall of said transverse member,

and a flap hingedly connected to said top wall extending between said Weight-bearing members.

3. The pallet of claim 2 in which a pair of trapezoidal flaps are hingedly connected to said end wall adjacent to the inner edges of said apertures and extend into said transverse member,

each of said trapezoidal flaps having its base adjacent said top wall.

4. The pallet of claim 3 in which said bases extend to r the hinged connection of one of said top wall flaps.

5. A pallet comprising a pair of channel-shaped weight-bearing members having downwardly extending legs hingedly connected and substantially perpendicular to an upper wall,

a pair of transverse members extending over opposite ends of said weight-bearing members, spacing said weight-bearing members and preventing inward and outward rotation of said legs with respect to said upper wall,

5 said transverse member comprising top and bottom walls having inner and outer walls extending therebetween, said weight-bearing members extending through apertures in the inner end walls of said transverse members,

and said transverse member having a panel extending between the legs of each of said Weight-bearing members to prevent inward rotation of said legs.

6. The pallet of claim 5 in which each transverse member has trapezoidal flaps hingedly connected to said inner end walls adjacent the inner edge of said apertures and extending inwardly of said transverse members,

and a flap hingedly connected to said top wall extending inwardly of said transverse member and abutting the inner edges of the trapezoidal flaps.

7. The pallet of claim 6 in which each transverse member has pairs of flaps hingedly connected to said outer end wall and extending inwardly of said weight-bearing members between said bottom wall and said upper wall.

8. The pallet of claim 1 in which said panel is bisectional.

9. The pallet of claim 5 in which said panel is bisectional.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,958,494 11/60 Lovegreen 248-120 3,000,603 9/61 Hermann 10856 3,012,747 12/61 Greene 248l20 15 FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2958494 *Oct 5, 1959Nov 1, 1960Materials IncPallet
US3000603 *Sep 21, 1959Sep 19, 1961Alton Box Board CoPaperboard pallet spacers and the like
US3012747 *Jun 14, 1960Dec 12, 1961Owens Illinois Glass CoPallet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3298327 *Jun 25, 1965Jan 17, 1967Grimes George SMaterials handling pallet
US3302593 *Nov 1, 1965Feb 7, 1967Roberts Paper CompanyPallet
US3308772 *Jan 3, 1966Mar 14, 1967Crescent Box CorpDisposable pallet
US3453973 *Dec 29, 1967Jul 8, 1969Vose HamiltonCollapsible paperboard pallet and method
US3464371 *Dec 21, 1967Sep 2, 1969Gen ElectricDisposable pallet
US3626860 *Jun 1, 1970Dec 14, 1971Walnut Ind CoFoldable expendable four-way entry pallet
US3628469 *Jan 4, 1971Dec 21, 1971Weyerhaeuser CoReinforced pallet
US3659534 *Sep 17, 1969May 2, 1972Lever Brothers LtdFork lift truck pallet
US3666165 *Sep 23, 1970May 30, 1972Westvaco CorpContainer and pallet
US3911834 *Sep 13, 1973Oct 14, 1975Int Paper CoPallet
US4095769 *Oct 2, 1975Jun 20, 1978Bruggemann & Brand KgFreight pallet
US4898321 *Apr 27, 1988Feb 6, 1990Delany Paul NCase and pallet systems
US5090336 *Oct 15, 1990Feb 25, 1992Golden Technologies Company, Inc.Plastic shipping platform blank and shipping platform
US7234402 *Mar 3, 2006Jun 26, 2007Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures
US7913629 *Apr 29, 2005Mar 29, 2011Gordon Norman HCollapsible pallet system and methods
US7980184Mar 6, 2006Jul 19, 2011Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures having interior vertical support ribs
US8291835Mar 25, 2011Oct 23, 2012Gordon Norman HCollapsible pallet system and methods
US8316779Jul 9, 2009Nov 27, 2012Gordon Norman HCollapsible pallet system and methods
US8365677May 27, 2011Feb 5, 2013Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures having interior support ribs
US8479666May 27, 2011Jul 9, 2013Douglas A. OlveyInterlock for nested top and bottom panels of foldably constructed force-resisting structures
US9555924Dec 23, 2014Jan 31, 2017Design Pallets, Inc.Corrugated pallet
US20050241549 *Apr 29, 2005Nov 3, 2005Gordon Norman HCollapsible pallet system and methods
US20060225626 *Mar 3, 2006Oct 12, 2006Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures
US20060248855 *Mar 6, 2006Nov 9, 2006Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures having interior vertical support ribs
US20100012000 *Jul 9, 2009Jan 21, 2010Gordon Norman HCollapsible pallet system and methods
US20110232537 *Mar 25, 2011Sep 29, 2011Pallets InternationalCollapsible pallet system and methods
USD746535Oct 17, 2014Dec 29, 2015Design Pallets, Inc.Bottom for a foldable pallet
USD746536Oct 17, 2014Dec 29, 2015Design Pallets, Inc.Top for a foldable pallet
USD767849Aug 3, 2015Sep 27, 2016Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed pallet
USD767850Aug 3, 2015Sep 27, 2016Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed pallet
USD775524May 21, 2015Jan 3, 2017Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed tray
USD776397May 21, 2015Jan 10, 2017Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed pallet
USD776398May 21, 2015Jan 10, 2017Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed pallet
USD800988Oct 5, 2015Oct 24, 2017Green Ox Pallet Technology, LlcFoldably constructed pallet with angled sidewalls
DE102015012066A1 *Sep 22, 2015Mar 23, 2017Karimov GmbHTransportpalette, Modul und Faltbogen dafür sowie Verfahren zum Herstellen einer Transportpalette
WO2006094268A2Mar 3, 2006Sep 8, 2006Olvey Douglas AFoldably constructed force-resisting structures
WO2006094268A3 *Mar 3, 2006Aug 23, 2007Douglas A OlveyFoldably constructed force-resisting structures
WO2015009183A1 *Jul 16, 2013Jan 22, 2015Obschestvo S Ofranichennoy Otvetstvennostiu "Upakovochnie Reshenya"Tray and box for accommodating piece products
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/51.3
International ClassificationB65D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2519/00278, B65D2519/00273, B65D2519/00562, B65D2519/00293, B65D2519/00567, B65D2519/00019, B65D2519/00054, B65D19/0093, B65D2519/00557, B65D2519/00323, B65D2519/00343
European ClassificationB65D19/00C3D4C