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Publication numberUS3217752 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1965
Filing dateMar 23, 1964
Priority dateMar 23, 1964
Publication numberUS 3217752 A, US 3217752A, US-A-3217752, US3217752 A, US3217752A
InventorsSutcliffe Allen B
Original AssigneeGoodyear Aerospace Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loom apparatus for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US 3217752 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 16, 1965 A. B. SUTCLIFFE LOOM APPARATUS FOR WEAVING CONTOURED THREAD CONNECTED DUAL WALL INFLATABLE FABRIC 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 23. 1964 INVENTOR. ALLEN B. SUTCL/FFE A TTOR/VE) Nov. 16, 1965 A- B. SUTCLIFFE 3,217,752

LOOM APPARATUS FOR WEAVING CONTOURED THREAD CONNECTED DUAL WALL INFLATABLE FABRIC Filed March 23, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. ALLEN 5. SUTCL/FFE ATTORNEY 1965 A. B. SUTCLIFFE 3, 7,

LOOM APPARATUS FOR WEAVING CONTOURED THREAD CONNECTED DUAL WALL INFLATABLE FABRIC Filed March 23, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. ALLE/V B. surcL/F/ g ATTORNEY United StatesPatent O 3,217,752 LOOM APPARATUS FDR WEAVING CONTOURED THREAD CONNECTED DUAL WALL INFLAT- ABLE FABRIC Allen B. Sutcliife, Hudson, Ohio, assignor to Goodyear Aerospace Corporation, Akron, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 23, 1964, Ser. No. 354,018 6 Qiaims. (Cl. 13920) This invention relates to a loom apparatus for weaving contoured thread-connected dual wall inflatable fabric, and more particularly to apparatus for weaving a double fabric having drop-yarns of various lengths extending between the fabrics to provide a contour between the top and bottom fabrics when the fabrics are moved apart to the length of the drop-yarns.

The art of double fabric weaving utilizing a double fabric plush or carpet loom is well known wherein the drop-yarns are generally made from a tufted yarn so that the fabrics may be split down the center of the drop-yarns to form piled carpet. Generally, these looms for forming plush or piled carpet have been called plush or carpet looms. One loom of this type is a Wilson and Lon-gbottom double shuttle plush loom made by the Wilson and Longbottom Limited of England, which loom is capable of weaving piled carpets. However, where it is desired to vary the spacing between the upper and lower fabrics to achieve desired contours, the art is lacking because there are no means known to properly vary the length of the drop-yarns. Further, problems arise in attempting to vary the length of the drop-yarns because of the frictional pull of the drop-yarns through the loo-m. Further, in order to achieve deeper or tapered fabric layers, it is desirable at times to vary the width of the upper and lower fabrics or to vary their angular relationship to each other without varying the length of the drop-yarns. These requirements cannot be met with the known are of double-shuttle or double-fabric plush or carpet looms.

Thread-connected dual wall inflatable fabric is manufactured and sold by Goodyear Aerospace Corporation of Akron, Ohio, under the trademark Airmat registered in the US. Patent Oflice.

Thread-connected dual wall inflatable fabric, hereinafter for simplicity called inflatable fabric, has been made with the threads sometimes called drop-yarns, of fine steel wire or of light but strong natural or synthetic fibers or filaments.

Inflatable fabric of this type when inflated provides a high strength per unit weight ratio. It consists of an upper and lower woven fabric connected by drop yarns of equal length for flat inflatable fabric or varying lengths for contoured inflatable fabric. At present, however, it is not possible to accurately and/or automatically vary the length of the drop yarns to make contoured inflatable fabric. Thus, using the plush or carpet looms of the art only flat inflatable fabric of approximately three inches thickness is possible, however, flat inflatable fabric can be made up to approximately six inches in thickness by including false picks to extend the drop yarns which picks are later removed.

Until the technique of weaving contoured inflatable fabric, as disclosed hereinafter, was developed, it was 3,217,752 Patented Nov. 16, 1965 necessary to cut fabrics into strips and gores which were sewn together to produce shapes such as cones, spheres, and air foils. This procedure was not only costly and time consuming, but also precluded, to a great extent, any attempt to produce such shapes with any degree of similarity.

It is the general object of the invention to avoid and overcome the foregoing and other difficulties of and objections to prior art practices by the provisions of a double-fabric loom which is capable of weaving parallel fabrics having extended drop-yarns therebetween to provide a desired contour between the fabrics upon movement of the fabrics away from each other to the length of the extension of the drop-yarns.

A further object of the invention is to provide a loom for weaving contoured inflatable fabric which is extremely simple, highly elfective, and generally low in cost.

A further object of the invention is to provide a loom for weaving contoured inflatable fabrics wherein the thickness of the inflatable fabric or a tapered contour can be provided without extending the drop-yarns.

A further object of the invention is to provide a loom for weaving contoured inflatable fabric wherein means are provided to facilitate extension of the drop-yarns through the loom to overcome the excessive frictional forces of pulling the drop-yarns through the loom.

The aforesaid objects of the invention and other objects which will become apparent as the description proceeds are achieved by providing in a loom for weaving contoured inflatable fabric the combination of means to weave an upper and lower fabric comprising longitudinal warp cords and transverse Weft cords, means to take off and extend the upper and lower woven fabric in parallel relation to each other, means to weave a plurality of dropyarns between the upper and lower fabrics, means to variably extend the length of the drop-yarns between the upper and lower fabrics to provide a contour between the upper and lower fabrics when the fabrics are moved apart after weaving and the drop-yarns are pulled to their extended length, means to vary the parallel spacing of the upper and lower fabrics, the means further having the capacity to change the upper and lower fabrics to a non-parallel relationship to provide a transverse taper between the fabrics, the means further adjustable during weaving to provide various desired widths or tapers between the fabrics, and means to assist in pulling the drop yarns through the loom during the extension thereof.

For a better understanding of the invention reference should be had to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a double-fabric plush type lom employing the embodiments of the inventibn;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the loom of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged broken away elevation of the gage angle mechanism showing the relation of the fabric thereto; and

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the loom gage angle mechanism of the apparatus;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the loom pile or drop-yarn pre-feed mechanism.

Weaving is the process of interlacing yarns, threads, strips, or strands of various materials in such a manner as to produce cloth or fabrics of an allied nature. All weaving operations are performed on machines called looms, which vary in construction according to the kind of fabrics they produce. Every Woven fabric is composed of two systems 'of yarn, namely, the warp and the filling or weft. There may be two or more warps or two or more systems of filling. The majority of fabrics are, however, What are known as single cloths and are composed of one system of warp yarn and one system of filling yarn. The warp is that system of yarn that runs lengthwise of the fabric and consists of a large number of separate threads, or ends. The number of ends in the warp depends, of course, on the ends per inch in the cloth and the width of the fabric. Before being woven, the separate ends of the warp, which are of equal length and arranged parallel to each other in the form of a sheet of yarn, are wound tightly on a round roll which is journaled to the frame of the loom and constitutes a part of the loom which is known as the loom beam or the warp beam. In the process of weaving, the Warp yarn is slowly unwound from the beam, which is placed at the back of the loom, while as the weaving progresses, the woven cloth is wound on a roll at the front of the loom known as the cloth roll. The filling is that system of threads that runs across the fabric from selvage to selvage and unlike the warp consists of a continuous thread or threads that are passed back and forth from one side of the cloth to the other and are interlaced with the warp. The filling is placed in the cloth one pick at a time by means of a moving part of the loom known as the shuttle, which travels back and forth across the loom from one shutle box to the other. The filling is wound in the form of a bobbin or cop, which is placed on a spindle in the shuttle.

In order to produce a woven fabric each warp end is drawn through the eye of a heddle placed on any one of a number of frames known as harnesses. These harnesses, which are carried in the center of the loom, are operated by suitable mechanism such as a dobby or a jacquard so that any of them may be raised or lowered through the space of a few inches when desired. Since some of the harnesses are raised while others are lowered, a diamond-shaped opening, known as the shed, is made in the warp, through which the shuttel carrying the weft is thrown. The shed then closes, after which a new shed is formed by the raising and lowering of other harnesses and the weft inserted as previously, thus interlacing the weft with the warp and forming a woven fabric. These two operations are known as shedding and picking. The shuttle is being thrown from one side of the loom to the other leaving the weft some distance from the edge, or, as is technically known, the fell of the cloth. It is necessary, therefore, after the insertion of each pick, to push the filling forward to the cloth that has already been woven. This operation is known as beating up and generally is accomplished by a portion of the loom called the lay that carries an arrangement of vertical wires known as the reed, through which the warp is passed. The three operations of shedding, picking, and beating up are known as the principle motions 'of weaving and are common to all types of looms. In weaving any fabric these three operations are repeated over and over again as the cloth is made pick by pick.

Other motions are applied to looms, but they are of the nature of auxiliary motions and are not typical of any principle of the weaving process. The chief auxiliary motions are: (l) the let-off motion for controlling the warp beam and letting the warp unwind as fast as the cloth is woven while it at all times keeps the proper ten sion on the warp; (2) the take-up motion for winding the cloth on the cloth roll as is woven by the loom; (3) the filling stop-motion for automatically stopping the loom in case the weft breaks; (4) the protector motion for protecting the warp yarn from being broken by the lay and shuttle in case the latter for any reason remains in the shed when the lay moves forward to beat up the filling; (5) the selvage motion for manipulating the selvage ends at each side of the warp in such a manner as to produce smooth and firm edges on the cloth.

Thus, with this background of weaving in mind the description of the weaving mechanism of the invention will be described. Particularly, with reference to FIG- URE 1,, the numeral 1 indicates generally the contoured inflatable fabric weaving apparatus of the invention which contains as its central mechanism a double-fabric weaving loom, indicated generally by numeral 2. In the loom 2 a plurality of warp beams 3 supply warp yarn l and a shuttle mechanism indicated by numeral 5, contains shuttles 6 and 7 to supply the filling or weft yarn. The warp yarn 4 is controlled by a dobby mechanism 3 so that sheds 9 and it) are formed to receive the shuttles s and 7, respectively. A reed 5b is provided to beat up the weft yarn. Thus, a top fabric layer 11 and a bottom fabric layer 12 are formed. However, instead of utilizing a conventional take-up roll, the invention contemplates that a fabric take-off mechanism, indicated generally by numeral 13, to provide parallel fabric take-off be utilized. The take-off mechanism 13 'operatively holds the upper top fabric lit and the bottom fabric 12 in clamp-s 14 and 15, respectively. The clamps l4 and 15 hold the fabrics in substantially parallel relationship during the weaving operation. The take-up mechanism 13 is operatively connected to a collapsible or telescoping support table 16 which table is mounted on rollers 17. The table lid is broken into a plurality of telescoping sections, as indicated by lines 16a, to allow the mechanism 13 to be initially positioned adjacent the loom 2 and then moved away as weaving progresses. The driving of mechanism 13 controls the positioning of the table 16. The takeup mechanism 13 is mounted on geared rollers 18 which are removably aligned to a rack track 19. Thus, the take-off mechanism may be driven through the geared Wheels 18 on track 19 in accordance with the picks per minute by the shuttle mechanism 5 to maintain proper movement of the fabrics to insure proper tensioning and weaving. Naturally, the extent of movement of the takeoff mechanism 13 relative to the track 19 away from the loom 2 is limited by the full telescopic movement of the table 15. Of course, when the mechanism 13 has moved to its furthest extend the woven fabrics must be cut off or otherwise taken away to allow the table lid to be telescoped for a new bite.

In order to provide the inflatable fabric characteristic and the contour thereof a plurality of drop yarns Ztl wound onto bobbins 21 and mounted on a creel 22 are provided. The drop yarns 20 run longitudinally through the loom 2 in substantially parallel relation to the warp yarn 4, and are controlled by a jacquard 23. The drop yarns 20 are woven into the upper and lower fabrics in the same manner as the warp yarns, but are crossed from one fabric to the other by the jacquard 23 to provide interconnection between the top and bottom fabric layers and to provide contour therebetween as will be more fully described hereinafter. It is contemplated that the drop yarn cross overs will be between about every two to about every fifteen picks. Thus, the top and bottom fabric layers are interconnected by a plurality of cross overs of drop yarn, indicated by numeral 24. The length of the drop yarns is varied by an extension bar, indicated generally by numeral 30, but described more fully hereinafter. The extension of the drop yarns is to provide a contour between the top and bottom fabric layers when the inflatable fabric is made fiuid impervious and inflated.

As an important feature of the invention a loom gage angle mechanism, indicated generally by numeral 25, mounted to the edge of the table 16 adjacent the loom 2, as indicated in FIGURE 1, is provided to vary the depth of the woven fabrics or to provide a taper without drop yarn extension as described hereinafter. Further, in order to provide the drop yarn extension through the r friction of the loom 2, a loom drop yarn pre-feed mechanism, indicatedgenerally by numeral 26 and mounted to the loom 2 may be provided as a feature of the invention to assist in pulling the drop yarn 20 through the loom 2 during the drop yarn extension. The pre-feed mechanism 26 will be more fully described hereinafter.

FIGURE 2 illustrates a plan view of the loom mechanism 1 of FIGURE 1, and particular attention should be noted to the fact that the drop yarn 20 extends longitudinally in parallel relationship to the warp yarn 4. A single strand of wrap or filling yarn 5a is indicated as having been passed transversely of the warp and drop yarns by the shuttle mechanism 5, and is ready to be beaten up by the reed 5b.

In order to provide an extension to the drop yarns 20 to determine the contour between the top and bottom fabrics in the inflatable fabric, an extension bar, indicated generally by numeral 30, is provided. Note with reference to FIGURE 1, that the extension bar 30 is placed behind the cross over 24 of the drop yarns 20 being woven into the fabrics. Means, such as connecting loops 31 and 32, respectively, may be connected to the ends of the extension bar 30 to pull it longitudinally between the woven fabrics in the direction of the arrows 33 to some desired position, such as indicated by the dotted line 34. Naturally, the longitudinal movement of the extension bar 30 may be accomplished manually or by some suitable mechanical means. After the desired extension the bar 34 may be removed between the woven fabrics 11 and 12 to be positioned in front of other crossed over drop yarns 20 to repeat the extension process. Of course, such manual positioning of the bar 34 will necessitate a slow weaving operation, but precision of the drop yarn extension is more important than a high weaving speed. In this manner, the drop yarns 20 are extended desired distances, according to the contour of the bar 34, so that when they are rewoven into the respective fabrics a certain length is determined between the top and bottom fabrics by the drop yarns 20 to achieve a contour the'rebetween when the inflatable fabric is made air impervious and inflated. The contour of the drop bar 30 may be predetermined to provide an air foil shape, a blunt rounded nose cone shape or any other desired configuration of contour between the top and bottom fabric layers with such determination provided by the length of the drop yarns 20 between the fabric layers.

The loom gage angle mechanism, indicated generally by numeral 25, as best seen in FIGURE 3, combines a pair of gage angles 40 and 41, respectively threadably received on an adjusting screw 42. The adjusting screw 42 is counterthreaded so that rotation thereof moves the gage angles 40 and 41 toward or away from each other proportionately as the screw 42 is turned. A mounting frame 43 comprising a part of the normally stationary or non-moving portion of the Table 16 rotatably mounts the adjusting screw and maintains its position by means of locking collars 44 and 45, respectively. Thus, the spacing of the top fabric 11 from the bottom fabric 12 is determined by the gage angles 40 and 41. Then, the fabric layers are held in substantially parallel relationship by the take-off mechanism, as described previously with reference to FIGURE 1. Note in FIG- URE 3 that the cross over drop yarns 20 are not indicated as being tight, but rather loose and able to be extended because of the extension thereof by the extension bar 30, as described above. Further, FIGURE 3 illustrates the reed 5b beating up the wrap yarn 5a into the fabric layers.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the loom gage angle mechanism 25 which more clearly shows the relationship between the gage angles 40 and 41 and the adjusting screws 42. In case it is desired to taper or adjust the parallel relationship of the gage angles 40 and 41 during the weaving process, a pair of conventional one way ratchet clutches 46 and 47, respectively, are mounted on the top ends of the adjusting screws 42. The clutches 46 and 47 have extended arms 46a and 47a which may be positioned for adjustable strokes by spring loaded adjusting screw mechanisms 48 and 49, respectively. A pair of plungers 50 and 51, respectively, are mounted to the reed 5b and thereby aligned with one of the extended arms 46a and 47a of the clutches 46 and 47 a small rotary movement can be given to the screws 42 each time the reed beats up the filling or weft yarn 5a. Thus, depending upon the adjustment, the gage angles 40 and 41 may be brought closer or farther apart in parallel relationship to provide a taper between the fabric layers in the woven inflatable fabric. Further, the clutch mechanisms could be so set up that one screw 42 would be rotated in an opposite direction to the other screw 42 to provide a taper between the gage angles 40 and 41 to provide a transverse taper to the woven fabrics. Thus, it is seen that the gage angles 40 and 41 are designed to move vertically up and down, as indicated by the arrows '52, thereby providing another means to control the contour of the woven inflatable fabric. Note the few illustrative guides or vanes 50 associated with the reed 5b in the usual manner.

Since there is a great deal of friction in the loom because of the dobby and jacquard mechanisms the extension of the drop yarns places a great deal of tension on the drop yarns so that the likelihood of breakage is increased. In order to eliminate this problem a loom drop yarn pre-feed mechanism, indicated generally by numeral 26, as seen in FIGURE 5, is provided. In FIG- URE 5 a plurality of drop yarns 20 are arranged in substantially horizontal relationship having been drawn from the bobbins 21 mounted on the creel 22. A depression bar is operatively mounted by a frame 56 in parallel relationship thereto. A pair of rods 57 and 58 are operatively connected to the frame 56 and are pivotally mounted to the loom frame 59 by means of a pair of mounting brackets 60 and 61, respectively. A pair of counterbalance weights 62 and 63, respectively, are mounted to the other end of the rods 57 and 58 to offset the Weight of the frame 56 and bar 55. In order to depress the bar 55 against the drop yarns 20 to pull a length of the drop yarns from their respective bobbins before the extension thereof, a rod 64 is pivotally connected to bar 58 and is eccentrically mounted to a motor 65 by means of an eccentric plate 66. The motor 65 can be actuated automatically when the pre-feed of the drop yarns is desired. It should be noted that the pre-feed mechanism 26 merely pulls some drop yarn from the bobbins before the extension so that only the friction of the drop yarns passing through the loom must be overcome. It has been found that this greatly facilitates the extension of the drop yarns.

The invention also contemplates another method of prefeeding the loom pile or drop yarns. This method, although not shown in the drawings, consists of pushing the creel 22 forward by means of an electrically driven screw while the drop yarns 20 are being extended horizontally in the front of the loom. During this cycle any extra slack in the yarns 20 because of taper or contour is taken up at the front of the creel with individual rod-type weights. Upon completion of the extension, the extended drop yarns 20 are held in position while the creel 22 reverse themselves. As they reverse the yarns become tighter and pay-off yarn from the bobbins 21 mounted on the creel 22. Thus, the pre-feed mechanism is ready for the next cycle.

Also, it should be understood that in order for the gage angle mechanism to work properly and automatically, a device (not shown) similar to the gage angle mechanism 25 would have to be mounted adjacent the warp beams 3 at the back of the loom 2. This device would then spread the warp yarn 4 off the beams 3 vertically away from each other as the gage angle mechanism 25 came together, and conversely would bring the warp yarn 4 vertically toward each other as the gage angle mechanism 25 moved apart thereby compensating for changes in tension of the warp yarns.

Thus, it is seen that the objects of the invention have been achieved by providing a double-fabric loom which utilizes a parallel take-up mechanism to provide proper tensioning to the fabrics during the weaving process. The fabrics are woven parallel to each other with a plurality of drop yarns interwoven therebetween, and with the length of the drop yarns being pre-determined by extension of the drop yarns before completion of the weaving into the fabric. In this manner when the completed fabric is made air impervious and inflated the drop cords extend to their full length to provide a desired contoured relationship between the fabric layers. A gage angle mechanism is provided to control the parallel spacing of the fabrics and to provide longitudinal or transverse tapers when and if desired. A drop yarn pre-feed mechanism is provided to assist in eliminating tension on the drop yarns during the extension thereof by pulling some drop yarn off the bobbins before the extension. It must be understood that this is a precision weaving process with the exact extension of the drop yarns being of critical importance. Thus, the picks per minute of weaving may be quite low with the emphasis being placed on the extension of the drop yarns and the proper weaving into the fabrics to maintain the desired extension.

It should further be understood that the principles of drop yarn extension, of gage angle control and of drop yarn pre-feed are the critical aspects of the invention, and that the mechanism disclosed is not necessarily the only mechanism to accomplish the desired results.

Thus, in accordance with the patent statutes, only one best known embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described in detail. However, it is to be particularly understood that the invention is not to be limited thereto or thereby, but that the inventive scope is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a loom the combination of means to weave an upper and a lower fabric in spaced relation, said fabrics comprising longitudinal warp yarn and transverse weft yarn, means to take off and extend the upper and lower woven fabrics in parallel relation to each other,

means to weave drop yarns between the upper and lower fabrics to connect said fabrics together in spaced relationship,

means to variably extend the length of the drop yarns between the upper and lower fabrics across the full width during the weaving thereof to provide smooth contours between the upper and lower fabrics when they are moved apart to the extended length of the drop yarns,

means to uniformly vary the parallel spacing of the upper and lower fabrics across the full width thereof during the weaving of the drop yarns therebetween to create a longitudinal taper between the upper and lower fabrics, said means further having the capacity to change the upper and lower fabrics to a nonparallel relationship to provide a transverse taper between the fabrics, said means further adjustable during weaving to provide various desired widths or tapers between the fabrics, and

means to facilitate the extension of the drop yarn through the loom.

2. In a loom the combination of means to weave an upper and a lower fabric in spaced relationship,

means to take off and extend the upper and lower Woven fabrics in substantially spaced parallel relation to each other,

means to weave a plurality of drop yarns between the upper and lower fabrics to connect said fabrics together, and

means to vary the parallel spacing of the transverse surfaces of the upper and lower fabrics during th weaving of the drop yarns therebetween to create a longitudinal taper between the upper and lower fabrics, said means further having the capacity to change the upper and lower fabrics to a non-parallel relationship during the weaving of the drop yarns therebetween to provide a transverse taper between the fabrics.

3. In a double fabric loom for weaving plush carpet comprising wrap yarn running longitudinally in each fabric, weft yarn running transversely in each fabric, and drop yarn running longitudinally in each fabric and crossing over between fabrics between about every two to about every fifteen picks, the combination of gage angle means to determine the spacing and the angular relationship of the fabrics, said gage angle means adjustable during weaving to provide longitudinal or transverse contours of the fabrics in relation to each other, said gage angle means consisting of a pair of spaced bars for receiving the warp and drop yarns therebetween,

reed means for beating said weft yarn up into the warp and drop yarns against the gage angle means, take off means adapted to engage the ends of the woven fabrics to provide tension in the longitudinal direction throughout the length of the woven fabrics and to maintain the fabrics in substantially the same relationship as determined by the gage angle means,

means to variably extend the length of the drop yarns between the fabrics during weaving thereof to provide a contour between the fabrics when the fabrics are moved apart to the length of the extended drop yarns, and

means to facilitate the extension of the drop yarns through the loom. 4. In a double fabric loom for weaving double fabrics comprising warp yarn running longitudinally in each fabric, weft yarn running transversely in each fabric, and drop yarn running longitudinally in each fabric and crossing over between fabrics, the combination of gage angle means to determine the spacing and the angular relationship of the fabrics, said gage angle means being adjustable during weaving to provide longitudinal and transverse contours to the fabrics in relation to each other, reed means for beating said weft yarn up into the warp and drop yarns against the gage angle means, and

take off means adapted to engage the ends of the woven fabrics and provide tension in the longitudinal direction throughout the length of the woven fabrics to maintain the fabrics in substantially the same spaced relationship as determined by the gage angle means throughout the take off operation.

5. In a loom for weaving double fabrics in spaced relation wherein drop yarns extend between the fabrics gage angle means to determine the spacing and angular relationship of the fabrics, said gage angle means adjustable during the weaving of the fabrics to provide longitudinal or transverse contours of the fabrics in relation to each other by varying the length of the drop yarns, said gage angle means comprising a pair of spaced bars having substantially flat surfaces in opposed relation operatively positioned to receive the fabrics therebetween, screw means threadably received in said bars and adapted to adjustably position the spaced relationship of said bars, one way clutch means operatively afiixed to the end of said screw means and being adjustable to allow rotation of said screw means upon actuation thereof, and means to actuate said one way clutch means to rotate said screw means to attain the desired spaced relationship of said bars.

6. In a loom for weaving double fabrics in spaced relation wherein drop yarns extend between the fabrics gage angle means to determine the spacing and angular relationship of the fabrics, said gage angle means being adjustable during the weaving to provide longitudinal or transverse contours of the fabrics in relation to each other by varying the length of the drop yarns, said gage angle means comprising a pair of spaced bars having substantially flat surfaces in opposed relation adapted to receive the 10 fabrics therebetween, and

screw means threadably received in said bars and adapted to adjustably position the spaced relationship of said bars.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,025,866 12/1935 Holmes 139-20 2,318,080 5/1943 Keen 139-21 2,848,018 8/1958 Neisler 139-20 DONALD W. PARKER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2025866 *Apr 10, 1935Dec 31, 1935Crompton & Knowles Loom WorksLoom to weave venetian blind tape
US2318080 *Apr 17, 1941May 4, 1943Collins & Aikman CorpLoop pile fabric and method and apparatus for weaving same
US2848018 *Jun 9, 1953Aug 19, 1958Neisler Brothers IncFabrics and method of making the same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3342221 *Jun 2, 1965Sep 19, 1967Toko IncPower loom for weaving magnetic memory devices
US4019540 *Mar 12, 1976Apr 26, 1977Mcdonnell Douglas CorporationLoom for producing three dimensional weaves
US5665451 *Oct 6, 1994Sep 9, 1997Textilma AgTextile insert for producing a fibrous composite material and fibrous composite material comprising such a textile insert
US5783279 *Aug 19, 1992Jul 21, 1998Cambridge Consultants LimitedFibre preforms for structural composite components
DE4342575A1 *Dec 14, 1993Apr 13, 1995Textilma AgTextileinlage zur Herstellung eines Faserverbundwerkstoffes sowie Faserverbundwerkstoff
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/20
International ClassificationD03D1/02
Cooperative ClassificationD03D1/02
European ClassificationD03D1/02