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Publication numberUS3217856 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1965
Filing dateMar 28, 1963
Priority dateMar 28, 1963
Also published asDE1262301B
Publication numberUS 3217856 A, US 3217856A, US-A-3217856, US3217856 A, US3217856A
InventorsMiles George T
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper feeding mechanisms for typewriters
US 3217856 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 16, 1965 G. T. MILES 3,217,856

PAPER FEEDING MECHANISMS FOR TYPEWRITERS Filed March 28, 1965 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

GEORGE T. MILES f2 cilia,

ATTORNEY Nov. 16, 1965 3.1-. MlLEs 3,217,856

PAPER FEEDING MECHANISMS FOR TYPEWRITERS Filed March 28, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 16, 1965 G. T. MILES 3,217,856

PAPER FEEDING MECHANISMS FOR TYPEWRITERS Filed March 28, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 5

' Nov. 16, 1965 a. T. MILES 3,217,856

PAPER FEEDING MECHANISMS FOR TYPEWRITERS Filed March 28, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 7

FIG. 8

Unite dtates Patent 3,217,856 PAPER FEEDING MECHANISMS FOR TYPEWRITERS George '1. Miles, Lexington, Ky, assignor to Internationat Business Machines Corporation, New York, N.Y., a

corporation of New York Fiied Mar. 28, 1963, Ser. No. 268,681 4 Ciaims. (Cl. 197-127) This mechanism relates to paper feeding mechanisms for office machines, and more particularly to mechanisms which are adjustable manually for feeding paper in typewriters according to any desired program.

It is sometimes necessary that forms be fed into a typewriter so that information may be typed in blank spaces arranged in a particular manner. Lines in which information is typed may be spaced from each other by varying numbers of line spaces. By providing a mechanism which may be adjusted manually to effect the feeding of papers according to any desired program, it is possible to reduce the time and effort required in typing forms.

A paper feeding mechanism contemplated herein comprises a drum operatively connected to the platen of a typewriter in such a way that it makes one rotation as a form or sheet of paper to be typed upon advances its full length about the platen. Power operated means are provided for effecting a stepped rotation of the platen to advance the form line by line in response to the actuation of a keylever. Mounted on the drum are stops which may be positioned selectively to stop the rotation of the platen by the power means at any desired point.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved mechanism for feeding a form or a sheet of paper in a typewriter.

Another object is to provide a mechanism which opcrates on depression of a keylever to produce stepped rotation of a typewriter platen for advancing a sheet of paper line by line until a predetermined line has been reached.

Still another object is to provide in a typewriter having power means for rotating its platen to advance a sheet of paper line by line, an improved means for disabling said power means after the paper has been advanced a predetermined distance.

Yet another object is to provide an improved mechanism for advancing a sheet of paper line by line in a typewriter to predetermined points, said mechanism including a member carrying stops which may be positioned manually to effect the stopping of a paper feeding means at predetermined points after the latter has been started by the depression of a keylever.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of an improved mechanism associated with the platen of a typewriter for feeding a sheet of paper according to a predetermined program.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of a cam shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a mechanism for 10- cating the leading edge of a sheet of paper at a predetermined point relative to the typewriter platen when inserting the paper for automatic feed.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the platen and paper guide with a stop in position for limiting the insertion of a paper sheet.

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken on the plane of the line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on the plane of the line 6-6 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of a mechanism for effecting a stepped rotation of the platen in a paper feeding direction.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged perspective view, partially exploded, of feed control mechanism shown in FIG. 1.

The paper feed mechanism is shown herein forming part of a typewriter which is similar to that shown and described in US. Patent 2,919,002 issued to L. E. Palmer on December 29, 1959. This typewriter includes a single type head 1 which is rotated and tilted to present selected characters to a platen 2 for printing. .After engaging the type head with the platen to print a character, means operate to move the type head longitudinally of the platen to another printing position. As soon as one line of information has been typed, the type head may be moved to the left hand end of the platen for starting another line. The platen may be rotated either manually by operation of a knob 3 (FIG. 5) or by driving an index pawl 4 (FIG. 7) into engagement with a ratchet wheel 5 fixed to the platen for effecting a feeding of a sheet of paper.

Pawl 4 is pivotally connected at 8 to a bellcrank 9 which is mounted on a fixed pivot 10 at the rear side of the platen 2. A link 11 connects the bellcrank 9 to another bellcrank 12 carrying a roller 14 which rides on a single lobed cam 15 freely mounted on a continuously rotating shaft 16. The bellcrank 9 is urged by a spring 18 in a direction to maintain a tension on the link 11 so the roller 14 is held in engagement with the cam 15. Pawl 4 is urged by a spring 19 toward the ratchet wheel 5 but a fixed abutment 20 acts to hold the pawl free of the ratchet wheel as long as the roller 14 engages the low portion of the cam 15. When the high part of the cam moves under the roller 14 and pulls the link 11 downwardly, the pawl 4 moves free of the abutment 20 and is rocked into engagement with the ratchet wheel for rotating the latter a limited distance. A suitable detent roller 21 engages the ratchet wheel 5 for holding it against rotation in the opposite direction.

For driving the cam 15, there is provided, as shown in FIG. 1, a disc 24 freely mounted on the shaft 16 at one side of the cam and having a shoulder 25 which is normally engaged by a control pawl member :26 biased to its normal position by spring or yieldable means 260. Extending through an opening 28 in the disc 24 is a stud 29 which is fixed to the cam 15 and pivotally supports a drive pawl 30 having a tooth 31 engageable with a ratchet wheel 32 fixed to the shaft 16. Another opening 33 in the disc 24 has a cam surface which is engaged by a pin 34 extending inwardly from the drive pawl 30. This cam surface acts on the pin 34 to cam the drive pawl away from the ratchet wheel 32 when the cam 15 is rotated counterclockwise relative to the disc 24. The free end of the drive pawl 30 is connected by a spring 36 to a stud 37 on the cam 15 so it is continuously urged in a direction to engage the tooth 31 with the ratchet wheel 32.

When the control pawl 26 is disengaged from the shoulder 25, the drive pawl 30 is swung inwardly by the spring 36 causing the pin 34 to act on the cam surface at the leading edge of the opening 33 and effect a turning of the disc 24 in a counterclockwise direction relative to the cam 15. As soon as the tooth 31 on the drive pawl engages the ratchet wheel, the cam 15 as well as the disc 24 is driven in a counterclockwise direction. For each rotation of the cam 15, the pawl 4 is driven to rotate the platen one line space. As soon as the control pawl is again engaged with the shoulder 25, the disc 24 is held against rotation while the cam 15 continues to turn slightly due partly to the driving action of the ratchet wheel and partly to inertia. The relative rotation between the cam and the disc causes the pin 34 to ride up the cam surface at the leading edge of the opening 33 and dis engage the tooth 31 from the ratchet wheel. In Order to hold the cam in a position to maintain the drive pawl disengaged from the ratchet wheel, there is provided a check pawl which is engageable with a shoulder 41 on a plate 42 attached to the rear side of the cam 15.

Movement of the control pawl 26 into and out of engagement with the shoulder 25 is effected by a feed control mechanism, generally designated 45, which is responsive both to a keylever 46 and to a program drum or rotating frame 47. The mechanism includes a plate member 48 pivotally connected at one end to a pin 49 carried by an arm 50 which swings about a stationary supporting pin 51. Fixed to the arm 50 for movement therewith is another longer arm 52 which extends downwardly to a point opposite a flange 53 on a depending arm 54 of the control pawl 26. The plate member 48 is provided with a downwardly projecting portion 55 (FIGS. 1 and 8) which may either engage at its right hand edge with the side of a flange 56 on a bracket 57 latching the mechanism 45 in a non-operative state or rest at its bottom edge on the top of the flange whereby the mechanism 45 is in an operative state. A spring 59 urges the member 48 both to the right and downwardly so as to maintain it in engagement with the flange 56. Another plate member 60 is fixed to the pivot pin 49 and has a horizontal flange 61 underlying the projecting plate portion 55. The right hand edge of the flange 61 is spaced to the left of the corresponding edge on the ortion 55. When the member 48 is swung upwardly to a point where its projecting portion 55 clears the flange 56, the spring 59 moves the member to the right until the edge of the flange 61 engages the side of the flange 56. This movement causes the arms 50 and 52 to rock far enough to disengage the control pawl 26 from the shoulder 25 placing the mechanism 45 in its operative state.

An upward swinging of the plate member 48 is effected by a member 64 pivotally supported on one arm of a bellcrank 65 and having a shoulder 66 engageable with the flange 61, as shown. The member 64 is urged by a spring 67 in a clockwise direction until a finger 68 engages the underside of the bellcrank 65. This normally locates the member 64 so its shoulder 66 lies under the flange 61 but it permits a rocking of the member 64 by the flange 61 if it should be in the way of the latter when moved to the left. Bellcrank 65 is provided with a slot 69 receiving a connecting pin 70 at one end of a link 71. The other end of the link is connected to a bellcrank 72 which is rocked in a counterclockwise direction on depression of the keylever 46.

When the keylever is depressed, the link 71 is operated to rock the bellcrank 65 in a counterclockwise direction. This lifts the flange 61 until the projecting portion 55 on member 48 clears the top edge of the flange 56. Spring 59 then moves the plate members 48 and 60 to the right until the edge of the flange 61 engages the side of the flange 56. This causes the arms 50 and 52 to swing far enough for disengaging the control pawl 26 from the shoulder 25. Disc 24 then rotates to a position in which the tooth 31 engages the ratchet wheel 32 and causes a driving of the cam 15. Each rotation of the cam causes a rocking of the bellcrank 12 to drive the pawl 4 against the ratchet wheel 5 for rotating the platen to advance the paper sheet one line space.

Connected to the platen for rotation therewith is a gear 74 meshing with a larger idler gear 75 which, in turn meshes with teeth 76 formed on the periphery of the program drum 47. Projecting from the face of the drum 47 at its outer edge is an annular flange 77 having radial openings 78 in which elements or pins 79 are slidably received. The pins are long enough so that their outer end extends somewhat beyond the periphery of the drum when their inner ends are flush with the inner surface of the flange 77. The angular spacing of the openings 78 is I) equal to the rotation of the drum 47 during a rotation of the platen one line space. At the lower edge of the drum is a hooked shaped member 80 slidably supported on studs 81 carried by a bracket 82 (FIG. 6). The member 80 is always in vertical alignment with one of the pins 79 when a sheet of paper is arranged on the platen to receive typing on one of its lines. A handle portion 83 is provided on the member 80 for moving it downwardly against the action of a spring 84 to force one of the pins 79 outwardly to the position shown in FIG. 5. Another member 86 is slidably supported on the studs 81 and is provided with a cam portion 87 which acts on the outer ends of the pins 79 when the member is lifted for forcing the pins inwardly to unset positions. By

rotating the drum 47 in a clockwise direction while the member 86 is held raised, all of the pins 79 are moved inwardly to their inactive positions.

Slidably mounted on the plate member 48 of the mechanism 45 is a control finger 90 having a bent portion 91 at one end adapted to be acted upon any one of the pins 79 when extended beyond the drum periphery. The other end of the finger 90 has a bent portion 92 (FIG. 8) which is slidably received within an elongated slot 93 in the plate member 48. Lying within the slot 93 is a spring 94 acting between the bent portion 92 and a stud 95 in the plate member 48 for urging the finger 90 to the right relative to the plate member. Formed in the finger 90 is a slot 96 receiving the stud 95 for guiding the finger and limiting its movement relative to the plate member 48.

Spring 94 normally holds the finger 90 in an extended position with the left end of the slot 96 engaging the stud 95. When the plate member 48 is swung upwardly until the lower edge of its projecting portion 55 clears the top edge of the flange 56, the mechanism 45 is moved to the right by the spring 59 until the edge of the flange 61 engages the side of the flange 56. The finger 90 is then positioned such that its bent end 91 lies in the path of any pins 79 extending outwardly from the periphery of the drum 47. As the mechanism 45 moves to the right, the arm 58, 52 operate to disengage the pawl 26 from the shoulder 25 and effect engagement of the clutch mechanism to drive the cam 15. This causes the bellcrank 12 to rock and drive the pawl 4 for turning the platen in a direction to feed a sheet of paper line by line. At the same time, gear 74 operates through the gear 75 to drive the drum 47 in a clockwise direction. When one of the pins 79 extending outwardly from the drum moves into engagement with the finger 90, it first moves the finger to the left until the right end of its slot 96 engages the stud 95, and then it moves the mechanism 45 to the left for locking the arm 52 in a direction to release the pawl 26 so the latter engages the shoulder 25 and effects a disengagement of the clutch. A the mechanism 45 moves to the left, the projection 55 on the plate member 48 drops off the flange 56 to a position engaging the side of this flange as shown in FIGS. 1 and 8. The mechanism is then latched in a position in which the clutch is maintained disengaged. The rocking of the plate member 48 downwardly to its latched position results in the movement of the bent end 91 on the finger 91) to a point below the end of the projecting pin 79 which actuated it. This permits the finger 90 to move to the right under the action of the spring 94 until the left end of the slot 96 engages the stud 95. The move ment of the finger 99 is just enough so its bent end 91 will clear the pin 79 which actuated it. When the mechanism 45 is again rocked upwardly by an actuation of the keylever 46, the bent end of the finger 90 moves upwardly behind the pin 79 which previously actuated it and is in position to be engaged by the next adjacent pin if the latter should be extended.

Before starting to type on any form or sheet of paper, the operator must first extend the pins 79 at points to effect a stopping of the paper feed for typing on desired lines. In order that the starting and stopping of paper feed take place at the same points during the typing of each form, the drum 47 must start from a home position for each form that is inserted. This is accomplished by providing one pin 79a which is fixed in an extended position. Assuming that all pins except pin 7% are in inactive positions, then an actuation of the keylever 46 will result in a rotation of the platen to drive the drum 47 until the pin 7% actuates the finger 90 for disengaging the clutch. The form is then inserted under the platen from the rear until the forward edge of the form engages a stop to be described later. This locates the form so it starts feeding from a fixed point when the drum 47 is in its home position. The platen is then rotated manually to feed the form until the first line to be typed upon comes into typing position. As the platen is rotated, the drum 47 is turned in a clockwise direction from its home position. With the form in position to be typed upon in its first line, the member 80 is moved downwardly to extend the pin 79 which acts on the finger 90 to stop the feeding of the form at this point. The platen is again rotated manually until the next line to be typed upon is in position, and again the member 80 is moved downwardly to extend another pin 79. This is continued until a pin has been extended for each line to be typed upon. After setting the pin for the last line, the keylever 46 may be actuated to cause a driving of the drum 47 until the pin 79a stops it in home position. The form may now be inserted to starting position on the platen and then the keylever 46 is actuated to feed the form by power until the first extended pin 79 disengages the clutch to stop the feed when the first line is in position to be typed upon. Feeding to the next line is again obtained by simply depressing the keylever 46. A depression of the keylever after the last line is typed upon results in an ejection of the first form and a driving of the drum 47 to its home position. If a different form is to be typed upon, then the extended pins 79 may be returned to inactive positions by holding the member 86 in its raised position while the drum 47 is turned through one revolution. With the drum 47 again in home position, the platen may be rotated manually for feeding the new form to positions at which pins 79 are again extended.

In order to insert a sheet of paper or form each time to the same starting position from which it may be fed by rotation of the platen, there is provided, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, a member 100 having stop fingers 101 which are normally spaced from the platen 2 but may be moved into engagement therewith for lirnting the insertion of the sheet of paper 103. Feed rolls 104 and 105 normally engage the platen to effect a feeding of the paper when the platen is rotated, but these feed rolls are moved to positions clear of the platen when the stop fingers are moved into engagement with the platen.

For positioning the member 100 and the feed rolls relative to the platen, there is provided a shaft 106 extending transversely of the typewriter and rotatably supported in a position at the rear side of the platen. Freely mounted on the shaft 106 is a bellcrank 108 having one arm rotatably supporting the front feed roll 104 and urged by a spring 109 in a direction to engage this feed roll with the platen. A lever 110 rotatably supports the rear feed roll 105 and is mounted on a pivot pin 111 located in front of the shaft 106. The lever 110 and the bellcrank 108 are loosely connected at 112 so that a rotation of the bellcrank in one direction causes a rotation of the lever in the opposite direction. Fixed to the shaft 106 is an arm 114 acting on a fiange 115 on the bellcrank 108 for forcing the latter in a counterclockwise direction against the action of the spring 109. At the right hand end of the shaft 106 is an arm 116 against which a manually actuated cam 117 acts for positioning the shaft against the action of the spring 190. As the cam is turned into a counterclockwise direction, the shaft 106 is rotated in the same direction for removing the feed rolls from the platen. A turning of the cam in the opposite direction results in a swinging of the bellcrank by the spring 109 for moving the feed rolls against the platen.

Fixed to the shaft 106 are arms 120 which are connected by springs 121 to members 122 freely mounted at one end on a crank rod 123. The opposite end of each member 122 has a cross portion 125 on which the member is supported, as shown. As the shaft 106 is rotated counterclockwise to lower the feed rolls from the platen, the arms act through the spring 121 to swing the members 122 upwardly for engaging the stop fingers 101 with the platen. A handle 126 on the crank rod 123 permits a rotation of the latter for moving the members 122 longitudinally to locate the stop fingers 101 at proper positions about the platen.

When a sheet of paper or form is to be inserted, the cam 117 is turned to move the feed rolls and the stop fingers to the positions shown in FIG. 4. After the forward edge of the paper 103 is moved into engagement with the stop fingers, the cam 117 is turned clockwise to effect a lifting of the feed rolls against the platen and a lowering of the stop fingers to inactive positions.

While there is shown in this application one form which the invention may assume in practice, it will be understood that it may be modified and embodies in various other forms without departing from the spirit or scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A paper feeding mechanism for a typewriter comprising, in combination:

a platen which is rotatable for feeding a sheet of cyclically operable means for driving said platen so as to advance said sheet of paper line by line;

means including a clutch which is engageable for actuating said cylically operable means;

a control mechanism for said clutch, said control mechanism including a plate member movable bodily in opposite directions for either engaging or disengaging said clutch;

means yieldably urging said plate member in a direction for engaging said clutch;

a support for guiding said plate member in its bodily movement, said plate member being movable angularly relative to said support when returned to its clutch disengaging position for latching it in such position against said support;

a control finger support on said plate member for limited movement relative thereto;

a drum operatively connected to said paten and driven simultaneously therewith;

pins slidably mounted on said drum and movable to extended positions in which they are engageable with said control finger for first moving the latter relative to said plate member and then moving both until said plate member is returned to the latch in its clutch disengaging position;

and means clutching a keylever for locking said plate member out of its latched position.

2. The mechanism of claim 1 in which said pins are angularly spaced on said drum a distance proportional to the spacing between lines on said sheet of paper, and including:

means yieldingly urging said control finger toward said drum relative to said plate member, said control finger moving to a position free of an extended pin when said plate-member is moved angularly to its latched position, said yielding means then moving said control finger forwardly until its end lies between the pin which just moved it and the next adjacent pin on said drum.

3. The mechanism of claim 1 including:

a member adapted to be actuated manually for moving to an extended position the one of said pins lying in a position to engage said control finger if 7 8 the latter is supported by said plate member while 2,354,082 7/1944 Wyrick 197-121 in a clutch engaging position. 2,541,295 2/1951 Sagner 197-114 X 4. The mechanism of claim 1 including: 2,554,903 5/1951 Goetz 178-25 a member adapted to be positioned manually for cam- 2,805,749 9/ 1957 Kleinschmidt 197179 ming inwardly any extended pins just before they 5 2,919,002 12/1959 Palmer 19716 reach said control finger. 2,944,651 7/ 1960 Malcolm et a1. 197133 References Cited by the Examiner 3,019,881 2/1962 Centran et al. 197-114 UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 931,680 8/1909 Cooper 197121 10 833,057 11/1961 Great Britain.

2,098,319 11/1937 Thompson 197133 X 2,331,120 10/1943 Hill et a1. 197-114 ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,217,856 November 16, 1965 George T. Miles It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 6, line 48, for "support" read supported line 56, for "the latch" read and latched same column 6,

line 58, for "clutching a keylever for locking" read including a keylever for rocking Signed and sealed this 6th day of September 1966.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER Commissioner of Patents ERNEST W. SWIDER Attesting Officer

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3818773 *Jul 11, 1973Jun 25, 1974Shinshu Seiki KkMotion transforming mechanism
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Classifications
U.S. Classification400/549, 400/570, 400/582
International ClassificationB41J11/36, B41J11/38
Cooperative ClassificationB41J11/38
European ClassificationB41J11/38