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Publication numberUS3219306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1965
Filing dateAug 30, 1961
Priority dateAug 30, 1961
Publication numberUS 3219306 A, US 3219306A, US-A-3219306, US3219306 A, US3219306A
InventorsJohnson Kenneth G, Newman Howard F
Original AssigneeEmil J Paidar Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Support and brake for barber chair
US 3219306 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N v. 3, 1965 K. G. JOHNSON ETAL ,306

SUPPORT AND BRAKE FOR BARBER CHAIR Filed Aug. 30, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ()RNIEYS N 1965 K. G. JOHNSON ETAL 3,219,306

SUPPORT AND BRAKE FOR BARBER CHAIR Filed Aug. 30, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 35- a so IN V EN TORS A OR EYS United States Patent SUPPORT AND BRAKE FOR BARBER CHAIR Kenneth G. Johnson, Aurora, and Howard F. Newman,

Evanston, Ill., assignors, by direct and mesne assignments, to Emil J. Paidar Company, Chicago, Ill., a

corporation of Illinois Filed Aug. 30, 1961, Ser. No. 135,061 12 Claims. (c1. 24s-404) The present invention relates to improvements in mechanisms for rotatable and elevatable chairs and particularly to power operated hydraulic chairs of the barber chair type.

The present invention is particularly concerned with providing a support bearing for a vertical lift cylinder or tube which extends downwardly beneath a chair seat and surrounds a piston and cylinder which elevate the chair. The invention is also concerned with the provision of an improved and simplified reliable brake for locking the lift cylinder and chair against rotation. The invention contemplates providing a hydraulic power elevating mechanism and a base for supporting the chair with a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving the lift tube, the bearing being in the for-m of a pair of axially spaced split rings held by the bearing housing with the bearing housing being split and adjustable so as to control the radial bearing clearance between the rings and the tube.

Also supported on the bearing housing is a brake comprising a pair of brake bands wound in opposite directions around the cylinder and secured at one end to the housing with a normal diameter less than the cylinder so as to automatically lock the tube. Solenoid operating brake release members are provided for engaging the free ends of the bands to move them in an unwrapping direction and release the brake.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved rigid supporting structure for an elevatable and rotatable chair.

Another object of the invention is to provide an adjustable lift tube bearing for engaging a lift tube or cylinder of an elevatable chair.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved lock or brake which is electrically operated for releasably braking an elevatable chair against rotation.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved chair support structure of simplified design incorporating improved coacting elevating, support, and brake mechanism.

Other objects and advantages will become more apparent in the teachings of the principles of the invention in connection with the disclosure of the preferred embodiments thereof in the specification, claims and drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a barber chair of the type operated by mechanism embodying the features of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view taken through the base of the chair operating mechanism showing internal details of the construction, and having parts removed or omitted for clarity;

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view of the mechanism at the base of the chair;

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially along line IV-IV of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along line VV of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational view, similar to FIG- URE 3, but having parts broken away and showing details of the bearing and brake structure;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary perspective view show- 3,219,306 Patented Nov. 23, 1965 ing another form of attaching the bearing housing to the base; and

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional view showing another form of anchoring the brake bands with the view being illustrated in section as it would appear if taken along line VIIIVIII of FIGURE 4.

As shown on the drawings:

FIGURE 1 illustrates a barber chair which is hydraulically elevatable and is accordingly provided with controls for elevating or lowering the chair and can be rotated freely. This is exemplary of various types of these chairs used in the barber and beauty field and the medical field, and for convenience, although the features of the invention provide advantages with various power operated chairs, the invention will be described as used in connection with a barber chair.

The chair 11 incorporates a seat 12, and a foot platform 13 which the occupant mounts for getting into the chair. As will be recognized, the chair must stably sup port, at various elevated positions, the weight of the occupant, and must be capable of supporting an occupant standing on the footrest which creates a lateral tipping force. This provides a need for a bearing mechanism which can take substantial lateral forces. It is necessary also to provide a braking mechanism for locking the chair in various rotational positions where it is set by the operator. The braking and bearing supports, and their relation to the base of the chair must be such that they operate satisfactorily to perform their functions and continue to do so over a period of years inasmuch as they are placed in shops and locations in remote areas where expert servicing is not available.

The base 10 incorporates a number of base parts including a formed lower base member 13a with a base support member 14 which rests on the member 13a and a shroud member 15 resting on the member 14. This structure, as shown in FIGURE 2, provides a support for the elevating mechanism for the chair which includes a supported container tank 16. The base member 14 is secured to the lower base member 13:: by elongated bolts 17 that extend downwardly through flanges in the members 14 and 13a, and the tank is supported on the flange of the base member 14 by short bolts 18.

The tank 16 contains hydraulic fluid and supports therein a hydraulic pump, not shown, which delivers hydraulic fluid through a line 19 to a pressure chamber 20 beneath a piston, also not shown, which is vertically slidable in a cylinder 22 to thereby elevate the chair. Hydraulic fluid is released from the pressure chamber beneath the piston by a solenoid valve 21 to lower the chair. Spaced outwardly of the cylinder 22 are vertical conductor rods 23 which extend through a brush enclosure 24 to bring electricity to the top of the chair; the details of this mechanism are not shown since they form no part of the present invention. The brush enclosure 24 and certain details are shown in FIGURE 2 but are omitted from FIGURE 4 for clarity. FIGURE 2 also omits parts outside the lift tube 27, for clarity. The enclosure of this conductor and brush mechanism is a part of the function of the lift tube or lift cylinder 27. The lift cylinder 27 extends vertically and has a hollow tubular shape enclosing the parts therein, and supporting the chair in a radial or lateral direction. For this purpose the lift cylinder 27 extends upwardly through a bearing housing 28, as shown in FIGURES 3 through 6.

At the top of the lift cylinder is a chair plate 25 which is suitably secured to the cylinder such as by the plate being provided with an annular groove 29 receiving the top edge of the cylinder and being suitably secured thereto such as by welding. The plate also has a central hole 'for receiving a piston rod 30 attached to the piston, which is not shown. The piston and piston rod thus elevate and 3 permit lowering of the chair while lateral stability is atforded by the lift cylinder 27.

The bearing housing 28 has a lower tubular portion 31 which is rigidly attached at its lower end to the base by being mounted on a top surface 14a of the base part 14. The tubular support portion 31 is suitably secured to the base such as by being welded, or it may be provided with a flange and bolted thereto as will be explained later in connection with FIGURE 7.

Surrounding the tubular support portion 31 are shown a series of radial fins 31a which are secured such as by welding at their lower ends to the surface 14a of the base, and which taper inwardly in an upward direction and are secured at their upper ends to a ring 32. The radial fins 31a are added for strength but may be omitted in the arrangement shown in FIGURE 7.

The bearing housing 28 is shown as being split into two parts 33 and 34, each provided with vertical flanges or ears at each side, as shown at 35 and 36 respectively. Bolts 38 and 39, as shown in detail in FIGURE 5, extend through the top and bottom of the flanges at 35 and are threaded into the flanges 36 for drawing the bearing housing sections 33 and 34 together. Set screws 40 are threaded into the flanges 35 and bear against the inner surface 37 of the flanges 36 for accurately adjusting the spacing between the sections 34 and 35 in order to adjust the radial clearance of the bearings for the lift cylinder 27.

The bearings are in the form of split bearing rings 42 and 43 carried in annular grooves 44 and 45 in the bearing housing. The bearing rings are sized so that they supportingly engage the tube and provide the sole support therefor.

The bearing rings are constructed of a steel backing filled with a mixture of lead, bronze, and plastic such as polytetrafluoroethylene. A plastic of this type is available under the trade name Teflon. The bearing rings provide long wear life without the need of lubrication and the parts need not be made with critical tolerances. The lift cylinder is slid into the bearing housing and bearing rings at the time of assembly, and bearing clearance is then adjusted by adjustment of the bolts 38 and 39 and the set screws 40 and 41. This eliminates the close manufacturing tolerances which have heretofore been necessary in rigid heavy long life barber chair constructions. The present construction is capable of long operating life without attention and this is accomplished without expensive machining operations.

A brake is provided for releasably locking the lift cylinder 27 against rotation, and the brake is provided in the form of resilient wound wire bands 46 and 47 encircling the cylinder 27. The bands are of spring steel, and the wound coil material is preferably rectangular in cross section to provide a broad braking surface for engaging the cylinder 27. The band 46 is wound in one direction around the cylinder 27 and the band 47 is wound in the opposite direction. The band 46 brakes or locks the cylinder 27 in a first direction, and the band 47 looks the cylinder in an opposite direction.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the end 48 of the band 46 is secured to the bearing housing 28, and the end 49 of the band 47 is also secured to the bearing housing, and the bands are wound so that they extend in opposite circumferential wound directions from their attached ends.

The free ends of the bands are engageable by pivotal brake release pawls 50 and 51. The bands have a normal diameter smaller than the diameter of the cylinder 27 so that they brake the cylinder, and the pawls 50 and 51 engage the free ends to move them in an unwinding direction and release the bands. The pawls 50 and 51 are suitably pivotally mounted on the bearing housing 28 and their outer ends extend through slots 54a and 55a in brake operating plates 54 and 55. The plates are pivotally mounted at the sides of the bearing housing on pivotal supporting studs 56 and 57. For anchoring the looped ends 48 and 49 of the brake bands, pins 52 and 53 extend down into vertical bores in the bearing housing.

The brake operating plates 54 and 55 are individually pivoted by solenoids 58 and 59 to a brake release position, and the solenoids are connected by cables 60 to the plates. Adjustable connections such as 61 are provided between the cable and the solenoid plunger, FIGURE 3, for adjusting the length of the cable so that the solenoid can have a full stroke. The solenoids are operated simultaneously by leads connecting to terminals 62 and 63 and electricity is applied to unlock the brakes. When the solenoids are deenergized, the resiliency of the brakes causes them to move tightly around the cylinder 27 and the wrapping action causes one of the brakes to lock when the chair and cylinder are turned in one direction, and the other brake to lock when the chair and cylinder are turned in the opposite direction.

When the chair is lowered, as may be observed in FIGURE 2, the lower end of the lift cylinder 27 descends into the tank 16 and engages the hydraulic fluid therein. To prevent this fluid from traveling up into the area of the brakes 46 and 47, a wiper seal ring 64 is provided beneath the brakes and the bearings. The wiper seal 64 is provided of a resilient suitable sealing material and has a downwardly extending lip supported on an annular ring 66 on the bearing housing.

A seal 65 is positioned on top of the bearing housing supported on an annular ring 67 attached thereto. This seal 65 keeps out dust and foreign materials. In a barber chair, hair and other similar foreign materials would tend to be drawn down into the bearing housing as the chair is lowered, and this is prevented by the seal 65.

In operation the mechanism is assembled and the sections 33 and 34 of the bearing housing 28 are adjusted to bring the bearing rings 42 and 43 to the proper radial tension with respect to the cylinder 27. Elevation of the chair is achieved by the hydraulic mechanism acting on the piston rod 30, and the chair is lowered by release of the hydraulic fluid through action of the valve 2 1. At all positions the sole support for the chair in a radial direction is provided by the bearing support rings 42 and 43. The chair is locked when the solenoids are deenergized and the brake bands 46 and 47 are released, and the chair is released for rotational movement by energization of the solenoids 58 and 59, which are conveniently connected to the same circuit for simultaneous release of the two bands.

In the arrangement of FIGURE 7, a base 10 is shown having a part 14' with an upper planar surface 1401'. A bearing housing 38 has an outwardly extending flange 65a at its lower end with vertical circumferentially spaced openings therein to receive bolts 66a which extend upwardly though the horizontal planar surface 14a, and the bolts receive nuts 67a to clamp the flange down against the surface 14a. This construction permits omitting the radial structural fins shown in the embodiment of FIG- URES 3, 4 and 6.

FIGURE 8 illustrates a simplified arrangement for locking the ends of the brake bands, and a bearing housing 28 is shown with a lift tube 27 extending upwardly therethrough. A brake band is shown having an end 68 projecting into a bored opening 69 in the housing. Within the opening are upper and lower brake band holders 70 and 71 which are knurled on their inner surfaces and grip the brake band end 68 between them. The holders are clamped rigidly together by a set screw 72 which is threaded downwardly into a threaded hole 73 in the hearing housing 28. The other brake band of course will have a similar securing or anchoring arrangement.

Thus it will be seen that we have provided an improved support and brake arrangement for an elevatable and rotatable chair mechanism. The combination provides the features, objectives and advantages above set forth, and is inexpensive in construction and provides long operating life without requiring adjustment or attention during operation.

The drawings and specification present a detailed disclosure of the preferred embodiments of the invention, and it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific forms disclosed, but covers all modifications, changes and alternative constructions and methods falling within the scope of the principles taught by the invention.

Each of the elements coacts for a strong support and to reduce vibration and noise. The cables 60, for example, absorb the vibration of the solenoid cores and prevent transmission to the plates and the solenoids are non-vibrationally mounted.

We claim as our invention:

1. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending lift cylinder secured at its upper end to the seat of the chair, a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving said lift cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, releasable brake means supported on said housing and engagable with the lift cylinder for locking the chair against rotational movement, an open container of hydraulic fluid below said cylinder with said cylinder entering the container in a lowered position of the chair, a wiper seal on the housing below the brake preventing fluid from being lifted with the cylinder up to the brake, and hydraulic elevating mechanism connected to the cylinder for elevating the chair With respect to the base.

2. A mechanism for a movable chair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending hollow tubular support cylinder for securing at its upper end to the seat of the chair and having a smooth outer surface, a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing receiving said cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, a coiled brake band winding around said support cylinder for movement by change in diameter between a braking position when the band grippingly engages the cylinder over its full circumferential surface with said cylinder being vertically slidable in said band, and a release position, means for operating said brake for selective movement to said positions, and a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within the tubular cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at its lower end to the base, and being spaced inwardly from the support cylinder providing an annular vertical space therebetween.

3. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending hollow tubular support cylinder for securing to the seat of the chair at its upper end having a smooth outer surface, a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving said support cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, means for adjusting the radial bearing clearance between the hearing and cylinder, releasable brake means supported on said bearing housing and engageable with the support cylinder for locking the chair against rotational movement, and a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within the tubular cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at the lower end to the base, and being spaced inwardly from the support cylinder providing an annular vertical space therebetween.

4. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending hollow tubular support cylinder for securing at its upper end to the seat of the chair having a smooth outer surface, a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving said support cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, a coiled resilient brake band winding around said cylinder and having a normal diameter smaller than the diameter of said cylinder so that the cylinder will be grippingly engaged, means securing one end of the brake band against rotation with respect to the base for braking the chair against rotational movement, means for moving the other end of the band in an unwrapping direction enlarging the diameter of the band to release the cylinder, and a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within said tubular support cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at the lower end to the base, and being spaced inwardly from the sup port cylinder providing an annular vertical space therebetween.

5. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a hollow tubular vertically extending sup-port cylinder secured at its upper end to the seat of the chair having a smooth outer surface, a .bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving said support cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, first and second coiled resilient bands winding around said support cylinder and having a normal diameter smaller than the diameter of the cylinder so that the cylinder will be grippingly engaged and locked against rotation, means secured to one end of each of the bands holding the bands against rotation with respect to the base, said first band winding around from its secured end in one direction and said second band winding around from its secured end in the opposite direction for locking the cylinder and chair against rotation in both directions, means for moving the unsecured ends of each of the bands in an unwinding direction for releasing the bands, and a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within the tubular cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at its lower end to the base and being spaced inwardly from the support cylinder providing an annular vertical space therebetween.

6. A mechanism for a movable chair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending hollow tubular cylinder for securing at its upper end to the seat of the chair, a bearing housing secured to the base carrying upper and lower axially spaced bearings in radial external supporting engagement with the cylinder, said bearings being the sole radial support for the cylinder, means for adjusting the radial bearing clearance between the bearing and cylinder, a brake secured to the base and releasably engaging the outer surface of said cylinder, and a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within the tubular cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at its lower end to the base, said lift cylinder spaced inwardly from said tubular cylinder providing an annular space therebetween.

7. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a hollow vertically extending support cylinder secured to the chair at its upper end and having a smooth outer cylindrical surface, a bearing housing having a pair of vertically separated split bearing rings slidingly and rotatably receiving the lift cylinder therein for movably supporting the chair on the base, means on the housing for adjustably increasing or decreasing the diameter of the rings for changing the bearing force between the rings and the lift cylinder, a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed within the support cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at the lower end to the base, said lift cylinder spaced inwardly from said support cylinder providing an annular space therebetween, and a brake secured to the base and releasably engaging the outer surface of said hollow cylinder.

8. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base, a hollow vertically extending tubular cylinder for securing at its upper end to the seat of the chair, an annular bearing housing mounted on the base and being vertically split into a plurality of sections and surrounding the lift cylinder, upper and lower split bearing rings held in the housing and supportingly surrounding the cylinder, means for adjustably changing the radial spacing of the housing sections for holding the bearing rings in bearing contact with the lift cylinder, a vertical lift piston and cylinder protectively housed '7 within the tubular cylinder for connecting at the upper end to the chair seat and connected at the lower end to the base, said tubular cylinder spaced outwardly of said lift cylinder providing an annular space therebetween, and a brake mounted on said base releasably engaging the outer surface of said tubular cylinder.

9. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair comprising a supporting base having a horizontal upper surface, a vertically extending tubular cylinder secured at its upper end to the seat of the chair, and providing lateral support for the chair, a separate lift cylinder and piston housed Within the tubular cylinder and operatively connected between the chair seat and base for applying a lifting force to the seat of the chair, said tubular cylinder spaced outwardly from said lift cylinder providing an annular space therebetween, a vertically extending bearing housing including a housing tube surrounding the tubular cylinder and having a hearing at its upper end slidingly and rotatably receiving said tubular cylinder, a radial annular flange at the base of the housing tube, means detachably securing said flange to said horizontal base surface, means for elevating and lowering the chair and cylinder with respect to the base, and a brake secured to said base releasably engaging the outer surface of said tubular cylinder.

10. A mechanism for a rotatable and elevatable chair of the type used for the treatment and cutting of hair comprising a supporting base, a vertically extending tubular cylinder for securing at its upper end to the seat of the chair, a bearing housing mounted on the base having a bearing slidingly and rotatably receiving said tubular cylinder for movably supporting the chair on the base, brake means on the bearing housing for releasably engaging the outer surface of the tubular cylinder and locking the cylinder against rotation, a lift piston and cylinder means for elevating and lowering the chair and cylinder with respect to the base being located within the tubular cylinder with an annular space between said cylinder means and said tubular cylinder, and a rotational seal on said housing above the bearing and brake for preventing the cylinder from carrying hair and other foreign materials into the bearing and brake as it is lowered.

11. An elevatable and rotatable chair mechanism comprising a base for supporting 'a chair, a lift tube secured at its upper end to a chair frame laterally supporting a chair, a lift tube bearing supported on the base for slidably and rotatably externally engaging and supporting said lift tube at spaced axial locations providing the sole lateral support for the chair, means for elevating and lowering the chair frame, said elevating and lowering means spaced inwardly from the lift tube providing a vertical annular space therebetween, and electrical conductor means for providing an electrical circuit for the base of the chair to the chair frame extending upwardly within said annular space in said lift tube and enclosed thereby.

12. In an elevatable and rotatable chair mechanism for disposition between a base and a chair supporting frame structure,

chair lifting means secured between said base and frame structure,

a torque tube carried by the frame structure and depending therefrom about said means, said torque tube surrounding said lifting means and providing an annular space therebetween,

releasable brake means operable to releasably hold the torque tube against rotation and thereby the chair against rotation,

means for operating said chair elevating means and said brake and including electrical circuitry,

and means for accommodating the electrical circuitry from the base to the chair through said annular space in the torque tube.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,364,882 1/1921 Koken 248-418 X 2,347,885 5/1944 Crickner 308-4 X 2,604,366 7/1952 Morgan et al 30865 X 2,803,224 8/1957 Wilson 308-4 X 3,028,933 4/1962 Mueller 188-77 3,069,124 12/1962 Roberts 248- 404 CLAUDE A. LE ROY, Primary Examiner.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1364882 *Dec 10, 1919Jan 11, 1921Koken Walter FBarber's chair
US2347885 *Nov 14, 1941May 2, 1944Crickmer Charles SWire line guide
US2604366 *Dec 6, 1949Jul 22, 1952Morgan Construction CoBearing
US2803224 *Sep 3, 1954Aug 20, 1957Hart Wilson JohnFluid cylinders
US3028933 *Nov 30, 1960Apr 10, 1962Gen ElectricSpring lock for X-ray apparatus
US3069124 *Jun 27, 1960Dec 18, 1962Roberts Harold DAdjustable chair assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3311407 *May 4, 1965Mar 28, 1967Hideharu HorieAutomatic device for operating the seat frame and back support of a hair dressing and beauty treatment chair
US8167374Jan 6, 2010May 1, 2012Suntracker Products, LlcPortable folding chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/404, 297/90, 297/344.23, 248/418, 297/344.19, 439/10, 297/71
International ClassificationA47C3/30, A47C3/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47C3/30
European ClassificationA47C3/30