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Publication numberUS3220363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1965
Filing dateSep 11, 1964
Priority dateSep 11, 1964
Publication numberUS 3220363 A, US 3220363A, US-A-3220363, US3220363 A, US3220363A
InventorsGingher Carl E
Original AssigneeGingher Carl E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall rack
US 3220363 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 30, 1965 c. E. GINGHER WALL RACK 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 11 1964 INVENTOR CARL E. GINGHER Nov. 30, 1965 c. E. GINGHER WALL BACK 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 11 1964 INVENTOR CARL E. GINGHER BY #QZQNEY Nov. 30, 1965 c. E. GINGHER WALL RACK 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 11 1964 INVENTOR CARL E. GINGHER United States Patent 3,220,363 WALL RACK Carl E. Gingher, Scranton, Pa. (104 Gentilly Drive, Clarks Summit, Pa.) Filed Sept. 11, 1964, Ser. No. 395,785 14 Claims. (Cl. 108-144) The present invention relates to a wall rack having shelves formed of spaced bars supported on wall mounted brackets, more particularly, to such a wall rack wherein the bars for the shelves may be adjusted with respect to the wall While maintaining the bars in spaced alignment.

In many types of buildings where large numbers of people gather, such as in schools, factories, industrial plants, offices and the like, it is desirable to provide a simple Wall rack of great strength which has a shelf struct-ure for supporting personal belongings and a suspension arrangement upon which garments, such as coats, may be hung. The basic function performed by such wallmounted racks is to support personal belongings and garments in an orderly manner. Thus, such a rack should have minimum inherent strength properties sulficient to effectively perform these functions. It has been found, however, that in many instances such Wall-mounted racks have been badly damaged by persons who may grasp portions of the rack to swing on them, or for other purposes. It has been particularly found that in the schools the younger people tend to use the racks to chin themselves in order to demonstrate to themselves and to others their strength. Accordingly, such wall-mounted racks as were installed in schools required considerable expenses for maintaining them in proper condition and in many cases it was necessary to completely replace the racks after short periods of time.

Such wall racks are usually installed by mounting them upon a long Wall surface such as in a corridor or one side of a large enclosed space as might be found in an industrial plant. When such racks were fixedly mounted upon the wall, they conformed to the variations of the wall surface from a vertical plane. In the construction of such building walls, the average run-out is only about 7 However, wall-mounted racks would tend to magnify this run-out and when a person stood at one end of the racks and looked along the line of racks upon the surface of the Wall, the deviations of the wall from the vertical were greatly magnified. As a result, construction of the building was unjustly criticized and in several instances, actually condemned. As far as is known, no such wall-mounted racks comprising a shelf and a garment suspending structure have been constructed which are readily adjustable after the installation of the racks in order to compensate for any deviations in the wall surfaces and to align the racks.

Not only must such a wall-mounted rack be readily adjustable and have great strength, but it should also be simple to assemble and install on site and should be relatively inexpensive.

For application on such wall-mounted racks and in other general applications, various arrangements have been devised for supporting clothes hangers. Clothes hangers are conventionally supported by a hook upstanding therefrom with the hook being positioned over a rod or bar. Where individual suspension devices for each clothes hanger are desired, the suspension devices have various forms of loops or openings formed thereon in order to receive the clothes hanger hook. Such suspension devices have also been constructed with specially formed receptacle portions to receive a particular type of a hanger means such as an enlarged or T-head on the end of a stem upstanding from a hanger. Thus, hangers with various types of hook or head arrangements thereon 3,229,353 Patented Nov. 30, 1965 ice installation so as to be in alignment regardless of any vari-.

ations in the wall structure.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a wall-mounted rack structure which has great strength but is relatively inexpensive and can be quickly installed on the site by relatively unskilled personnel.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a clothes hanger suspension device which is slidaibly mounted in a track and which can receive clothes hangers having hanger hooks and the T-type and balltype hanger hooks.

The objects of the present invention are achieved and the disadvantages of the prior art are eliminated by the wall-mounted rack of the present invention. This rack essentially comprises a plurality of brackets which are mounted upon a wall and are vertically adjustable thereon. A supporting bracket is mounted on each wall bracket to support a plurality of spaced bars or rods which define a shelf. Slidably carried Within the supporting brackets are adjusting slides to which the spaced bars are attached. The position of the slides may be varied with respect to the wall so as to adjust the distance of the bars from the wall but to maintain the bars in fixed spaced relationship to each other. Enclosing the ends of each supporting bracket is an end cap which is attached to the end of the adjustable slide within each supporting bracket.

The shelf bars comprise hollow tubular members which have a triangular cross-section and a longitudinally extending slot in one side thereof. The edges of the slot are bent inwardly toward the center of the rod to define a track upon which a clothes hanger suspension device may be slidably mounted. The use of the triangular shaped rods to form the shelf results in a wall-mounted bar rack which is of tremendous strength. Tests have indicated that the wall rack of this invention is from 300 to 900% stronger than any similar racks currently on the market. This is an outstanding advantage since tests have shown that one of the leading causes of damage to such racks, particularly when installed in schools, is the use of such racks as chinning bars by the students.

The use of such tubular members results in an overall lower material cost since it is not necessary to perform a seam welding operation on the shelf bars. It is therefore feasible to utilize heavier gauge steels to form these tubular members than would be the case if it were necessary to seam-weld the shelf bars. It is estimated that even using heavier gauge steel but eliminating seam I welding, the wall rack of this invention can be sold for approximately two-thirds of the cost of any similar rack now on the market.

A clothes hanger bar which is similar to the tubular shelf rods may be mounted on the underside of the supsuspended on such a hanger bar will position themselves so that the hangers are all parallel to each other.

The triangular section hanger bar may also be attached to the ends of the supporting brackets by adapters so that the slotted face of the hanger bar is directed downwardly. In this position clothes hangers suspension devices are slidably mounted within the triangular hanger bar. The base of the suspension device which is within the hanger bar is provided with a groove in the lower face thereof which groove receives the tracks defined by the upturned edges of the hanger bar slot.

The clothes hanger suspension device essentially comprises a rod-like member bent into the form of a V with the lower or apex end of the V being bent rearwardly at substantially right angles to the remainder of the V. This provides a universal suspension arrangement which can easily accommodate clothes hanger hooks of enlarged, T-shaped or ball heads on stems upstanding from clothes hangers. Thus, with the clothes hanger suspension device of this invention, it is not necessary to provide adapters to accommodate the different types of supports for clothes hangers which are on the market today.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the accompanying description when taken in conjunction with the following drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an overall perspective view of the wallmounted rack of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the front portion of the rack of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical sectional view through a wall bracket and corresponding supporting bracket of the rack of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an overall perspective view of a supporting bracket of the present invention;

FIGURE 5 is an overall perspective view of the adjustable slide carried in the supporting bracket and to which the bars defining the shelf are attached;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of an adapter for securing the hanger bar to the underside of a supporting bracket;

FIGURE 7 is an overall perspective view of the end of a tubular bar of the present wall rack, together with a telescoping triangular section to hold the ends of adjoining tubular bars in alignment;

FIGURE 8 is an overall perspective view of a clothes hanger suspension device of the present invention;

FIGURES 9A and 9B show a ball head and T-head on stems of a clothes hanger positioned in the suspension device of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is an overall perspective view of a modified rack wherein the hanger bar is attached directly to the underside of the supporting bracket;

FIGURE 11 is an end view of the hanger bar of FIG- URE l0, and illustrating a clothes hanger hook positioned thereon; and

FIGURE 12 is an overall perspective view of a further modification of the wall rack of this invention and showing clothes hanger suspension devices slidably carried in the foremost one of the bars defining the shelf.

Proceeding next to the drawings wherein like reference symbols indicate the same parts throughout the various views, a specific embodiment of the present invention will be described in detail.

The wall-mounted bar rack of the present invention is indicated generally at 1 in FIGURE 1. The rack comprises a plurality of wall brackets 2 each of which has a channel cross-section with a plurality of pairs of slots 3 in the web 4 thereof. In the ends of the bracket webs 4 are slots 5 through which are passed bolts 6 to secure the bracket to the wall. The slot and bolt arrangement 5 and 6 enables the wall brackets to be adjusted vertically on the wall. The ends of the channel Wall bracket webs 4 are bent over at 7 so as to close the ends of the brackets.

The brackets may be made in various lengths so as to accommodate a plurality of vertically spaced shelves or to mount the shelves at different heights with respect to the floor to accommodate increasing heights of growing children.

Mounted on each Wall bracket is a supporting bracket, indicated generally at 8 and illustrated in greater detail in FIGURES 3 and 4. The bracket 8 is formed of coldrolled sheet steel which has an inherent resilience and is bent in substantially a U-shaped cross-section as may be seen in FIGURE 4, and in the shape of a right triangle. The bend which forms the lower end of the U-shaped cross section comprises the hypotenuse of the triangle, as indicated at 9. In forming of the bracket 8 the cross section of the bracket actually tapers outwardly from the bent side 9 so that the legs of the U-shaped cross section are not parallel to each other prior to assembly of the bracket.

A backing piece 10 is spot welded to each inner face of the bracket sides 11 and 12 adjacent the short end thereof. There are a plurality of pairs of projections 13 extending outwardly from each of the backing pieces 10. Each projection has a notch 14 on the underside thereof adjacent the edge of the bracket and is of a width sufficient to accommodate the sheet steel from which the wall brackets 2 are formed. There are aligned openings 15 in the bracket sides 11 and 12 adjacent the shorter leg of the bracket. A nut and bolt assembly, indicated at 15A in FIGURE 3, may be passed through this pair of aligned holes and tightened to urge the faces of the bracket together after the bracket has been mounted on the wall bracket 2 so as to lock the projections 13 of the supporting bracket within the slots of the wall bracket.

As may be seen in FIGURE 3, the underside of the forward end of the bracket 8 has a flattened portion 16 with an opening 17 therein. There are a plurality of openings 18 spaced along the bend 9. The upper edges of the supporting brackets sides 11 and 12 are bent inwardly to form flanges 19 and 20.

Positioned within each supporting bracket 8 against the inner flanges 19 and 20 is an adjustable slide 21, illustrated in FIGURE 5. The slide 21 has a channel cross section with a plurality of spaced openings 22 in the web 23 thereof. The outer end of the channel is bent downwardly at right angles to form a bent portion 24 having a threaded opening 25 therein. There is a slot 26 in the web 23 adjacent the bent portion 24.

Supported on the upper edges of the supporting brackets 8 and attached to the adjustable slides therein are a plurality of spaced bars 27 which are parallel to the wall upon which the rack is mounted to define a shelf. The bars 27 are hollow and have a cross section which defines an equilateral triangle. The open ends of the bars are closed by caps 27A tightly fitted thereon. One face of the bar 28 has a longitudinally extending slot 29 therein. The edges of the slot are bent inwardly at 30 so as to define a track. The bars 27 are formed from sheet steel of a suitable gauge with no seam welding being necessary in the fabrication of this bar. The resulting triangular bar With the slot therein has considerable strength. Even by using a somewhat heavier gauge sheet steel than would be employed in a seam welded bar, the triangular bar of the present invention is considerably cheaper to make than would be the case if it were necessary to perform a seam welding operation on the bar.

The shelf bars 27 are secured to the upper edges of the supporting brackets 8 by Phillip head bolts 31 passed upwardly through selected openings 22 in the adjustable slide adapter 21 and extending into the slot 29 of a particular bar. An elongated nut or lug 32 is threadedly received on the end of the bolt 31 within the hollow bar. The nut 32 is sufiiciently long so that the ends thereof will engage the faces 33 and 34 of the bar whereby the nut is prevented from rotating within the bar. Access to the head 35 of the bolt 31 is provided by inserting a screw driver up through an opening 18 in the lower edge 9 of the supporting bracket.

An end cap 36 which has a flange 37 extending around its entire periphery fits closely over the forward open end of the supporting bracket. The end cap is secured to the bent end 24 of the slide 21 by a screw 38.

In the rack installation illustrated in FIGURE 1, there is mounted on the lower edge of the supporting brackets and adjacent the outer end thereof, a hanger bar 39 with its slotted face positioned downwardly. To mount the hanger bar in this position there is provided an adapter 40 which may be seen in FIGURES 2 and 6. The adapter 40 has a base portion 41 which is of considerable thickness so as to have a threaded opening 42 therein. Depending from opposed sides of the base 41 are legs 43 and 44 each of which has a triangular opening 45 therein to conform to the shape of the triangular bar 27 so that such a bar may be snugly received therein.

The adapter 40 is secured to the flattened portion 16 on the forward end of the supporting bracket 8 by positioning the base 41 of the adapter against the flattened portion 16 and threading a bolt downwardly through the opening 17 into threaded engagement with the adapter opening 42. Access to the head of such a bolt may be through the slot 26 in the slide 21 or, in the absence of the slide, between the flanges 19 and 20 on the upper edge of the supporting bracket.

With the adapters 40 in position a hanger bar 39 may then be positioned therein, as may be seen in FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawings.

When a plurality of the wall racks of the present invention are installed along a wall in end-to-end relationship, telescoping triangular sections 46 as may be seen in FIG- URE 7 are inserted into the adjoining ends of the bars 27 in order that the bars may be maintained in alignment. The telescoping section 46 has a triangular cross section so as to conform to the cross section of the bar 27 and to be snugly received therein. One face 47 of the telescoping section is provided with a longitudinal slot 48 to accommodate the flanges 30 of the bar.

As may be seen in FIGURE 1, the hanger bar 39 is utilized as a track in which are slidably carried a plurality of clothes hangers suspension devices 49, as illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 8.

The suspension device 49 comprises a base 50 formed of a rectangular piece of metal with opposed edges thereof being bent inwardly at 51 and 52 to form spaced apart channels with the terminal edges 53 of the channels defining therebetween a slot 54. The slot 54 receives the track portions 30 of the bar 27.

To form the support for the hanger, a single rod-like member 55 is bent to form a V portion 56, with the ends of the rod 57 being bent over into engagement with the top surface of the bar 49 and welded thereto. The end or apex 58 of the V is curved and then bent rearwardly at 59 at a right angle to the V portion 56. The V portion 56 is substantially at right angles to the base 49. An opening 60 is formed within the base 49 to accommodate a locking nut if it is desired that the suspension device 49 be locked in position within the hanger bar 39.

As may best be seen in FIGURE 2, the presence of the slidable suspension device 49 within the hanger bar 39 adds considerable strength to the bar. The edges 51 and 52 of the suspension device base 49 engage the inner faces of the triangular bar and thus prevent the triangular bar from closing so as to narrow the slot 29 therein. In addition, the terminal edges 53 of the suspension device base 49 engage the flanges 30 of the triangular bar slot 29 so as to prevent opening or spreading of this slot.

In FIGURE 9 there is illustrated the manner in which a ball head support 61 of a clothes hanger and the T type 'head 62 are supported within the suspension device of the present invention. The ball type and T type heads are usually used on clothes hangers to prevent the use of such hangers except on special adapters attached permanently on hanger bars. In either event, the wide V-shaped portion 56 facilitates insertion of either the hanger hook or the ball or T heads into the rearwardly bent apex 58 of the suspension device 49.

Proceeding next to FIGURE 10, there is shown a wall rack of the present invention provided with a hanger bar 63 which has its slotted face 64 mounted directly to the flat portion 16 on the forward lower edges of the supporting brackets 8. In this arrangement the same type of bolt and nut 31 and 32 as illustrated in FIGURE 2 is employed to secure the bar 63 to the supporting brackets 8. The bolt is passed downwardly through the opening 17 to threadedly engage the elongated nut which is within the triangular hanger bar in the same manner as in the triangular bar 27 shown in FIGURE 2. Again access to the head of this bolt is provided through either the slot 26 in the slide 21 or between the flanges 19 and 20 of the upper edge of the supporting bracket.

With the hanger bar 63 the clothes hanger hook 65 is supported at two points, as shown in FIGURE 11. This will straighten out the hanger so that all hangers on the bar 63 are parallel to each other.

In FIGURE 12 there is shown a further modification of the wall rack of this invention wherein a hanger bar is omitted but clothes hanger suspension devices 49 are slidably positioned in the foremost bar 66 defining the shelf of the rack. The suspension devices may be free to slide within the bar 66 or may be secured in fixed position by passing a bolt upwardly through the opening 60 in the base of the suspension device, as shown in FIGURE 8.

It is pointed out that the suspension device 49 of the present invention has the opening in the apex 58 facing to the front of the rack so that the person desiring to position a clothes hanger on the suspension device has full visibility of the suspension device. This is a great advantage when compared with previous suspension devices wherein access to the slotted opening was from the sides and, accordingly, difiiculty was encountered in either positioning or removing a clothes hanger from such prior art suspension devices, particularly when many garments were closely packed upon suspension devices. Further, while the opening in the apex 58 of the suspension device is only slightly wider than the diameter of the stem upstanding from the clothes hanger, the V-shaped portion 56 forms a guide to the slot to facilitate the hanging of clothes hangers thereon. Thus, while the actual supporting of the hanger hook is in a narrow slotted opening 58 in the apex, positioning of the hanger hook is considerably facilitated by the V portion 56 which guides the apex to the apex 58.

In the installation of the wall rack of the present invention, the wall brackets 2 are first mounted by the screws 16 on the wall in their approximate vertical positions. The slot 5 in which the screw 6 is received provides for a subsequent fine vertical adjustment of the wall brackets to insure that the bars 27 which define the shelf of the rack are substantially horizontal.

The spacing of the bars 27 with respect to each other and the distances of these bars from the wall is determined by selecting the openings 22 in the slide through which the bolts 31 are passed. When the bars 27 are mounted upon the slide, the slide may then be positioned within the supporting brackets by slidable movement therein perpendicularly to the wall. This will compensate for any variations of the wall surface which are found in all new buildings and which are very apparent when a plurality of such racks are installed end-to-end over a great many feet of the wall.

v The end cap 36 is telescopingly positioned over the open end of the supporting bracket and positioned by screwing bolt 38. Thus, these end caps remain in the same relative position with the shelf bars 27 so that when the racks are sighted linearly they all appear to be in alignment, particularly the outermost portions thereof which are the caps 36. By compensating for variations in the wall surface in this manner, an observer looking down a line of these racks will note that all of the bars and end caps are in alignment.

The alignment of the adjoining bars is maintained by the use of the telescoping triangular section 46 illustrated in FIGURE 7.

Thus, it can be seen that the present invention discloses a knockdown, wall-mounted wall rack having a shelf thereon formed by a plurality of spaced bars parallel to the wall surface. The rack is readily installed on the site and may then be adjustable after installation to compensate for any horizontal deviations in the wall surface. Further, this wall rack has considerably greater strength than other similar racks on the market with this additional strength being achieved together with a lower cost of the material comprising the rack. The horizontal adjustment of the bars forming the shelf and the vertical adjustment of the wall brackets enables the racks to be quickly installed upon walls since the final alignment of the racks, both vertically and horizontally, can be made after they have been mounted upon the walls.

It will be understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions and accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modifications within this invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, an adjustable slide mounted on each of said brackets for movement perpendicular to said wall, a plurality of spaced bars attached to said slides and parallel to said wall to define a shelf, and means for adjustably positioning said slides on their respective brackets to selectively position said bars from said wall.

2. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, an adjustable slide mounted on each of said brackets for movement perpendicular to said wall, a plurality of spaced bars attached to said slides and parallel to said wall to define a shelf, and means carried by said slide and engageable with said bars for adjustably positioning said slide and bars to vary the position of said bars from said wall.

3. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, said brackets each having a U-shaped cross section with the upper edge being substantially horizontal and having a track thereon, an adjustable slide within each bracket immediately below said upper edge, spaced bars mounted on the upper edge of said brackets and parallel to said wall to define a shelf, and means on said slides for selectively clamping said bars and slides along said upper edge track to vary the position of said bars with respect to said wall.

4. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, said brackets each having a U-shaped cross section with the upper edge being substantially horizontal and having a track thereon, an adjustable slide within each bracket immediately below said upper edge, spaced bar's mounted on the upper edges of said brackets and parallel to said wall to define a shelf, and means on said slides for selectively clamping said bars and slides along said upper edge track to vary the position of said bars with respect to said wall, there being openings on the bottom edges of said U- shaned brackets for access to said clamping means.

5 A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, said brackets each having a U-shaped cross section with the upper edges thereof being substantially horizontal and each having a track thereon, an adjustable slide within each bracket immediately below said upper edge, the outer ends of said slides away from the wall being bent downwardly, a plurality of spaced bars supported on the upper edges of said brackets and parallel to said wall to define a shelf, means on said slides for selectively clamping said bars and slides along said upper edge tracks to vary the position of said bars with respect to said wall, and an end cap adjustably mounted on said slide bent end whereby the position of said end cap with respect to the wall can be varied after said slide is in position.

6. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, a plurality of spaced bars supported. upon said brackets parallel to said wall to define a shelf, and means on said brackets for adjustably positioning said bars with respect to the Wall while maintaining fixed distances between the individual bars.

7. .A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising :a plurality of brackets each having one end thereof mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, a plurality of spaced bars supported upon said brackets parallel to said wall to define a shelf, means on said brackets for adjustably positioning said bars with respect to the wall while maintaining fixed distances between the individual bars, end caps on the other ends of each of said brackets, and means on said brackets for adjustably positioning said end caps upon said bracket other ends to vary the distances of said end caps from the wall whereby said end caps are aligned irrespective of irregularities in the wall surface,

8. A wall rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of brackets each having one end thereof mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, said brackets each having a U-shaped cross section with the upper edges thereof being substantially horizontal and having a track thereon, an adjustable slide within each. bracket immediately below said upper edge tracks, a plurality of spaced hollow rods supported on the upper edges of said brackets parallel to said wall to define a shelf, each of said rods having a longitudinally extending slot in the lowermost portion thereof engaging said brackets, and means on said slides extending upwardly through said bracket tracks and rod slots into said rods for selectively clamping said rods and slides along said upper edge tracks to vary the position of said rods with respect to said wall.

9. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of brackets each having one end thereof mounted on a wall and extending outwardly therefrom, said brackets each having a U-shaped cross section with the upper edges thereof being substantially horizontal and having a track thereon, an adjustable slide within each bracket immediately below said upper edge tracks, a plurality of spaced hollow rods supported on the upper edges of said brackets parallel to said wall to define a shelf, each of said rods having :a longitudinally extending slot in the lowermost portion thereof engaging said bracket upper edges, and detachable fastening means including a first member non-rotatably positioned in each of said rods in registration with the rod slot and bracket track and a second member carried by said slide and extending upwardly to connect with the respective first member to clamp said rods and slides along the upper edge tracks to vary the positions of said rods with respect to said wall.

10. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets each having one end thereof attached to a wall and supporting surface, an adjustable slide carried by each bracket adjacent the supporting surface thereof, a plurality of spaced bars parallel to said wall to define a shelf on said bracket upper surfaces and attached to said slides, means for adjustably positioning said slides on their respective brackets to selectively position said bars from said wall, and a hanger bar attached to the edge of said bracket opposed from 9 said supporting surface adjacent the ends of the brackets away from said wall for supporting garment hangers therefrom, said hanger bar comprising a tubular member having a triangular cross section with an angle of said tubular member being attached to said edge of said bracket.

11. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of supporting brackets each having one end thereof attached to a wall and a supporting surface, an adjustable slide carried by e-ach bracket adjacent the supporting surface thereof, a plurality of spaced bars parallel to said wall to define a shelf on said bracket upper surfaces and attached to said slides, means for adjustably positioning said slide-s on their respective brackets to selectively position said bars from said Wall, and a hanger bar attached to the edge of said bracket opposed from said supporting surface adjacent the ends of the brackets away from said wall for supporting garment hangers therefrom, said hanger 'bar comprising a tubular member having a triangular cross section with a face thereof being directed upwardly and positioned horizontally so that a clothes hanger hook can be suspended therefrom.

12. A rack structure as claimed in claim 10, with the face of the hanger bar opposed from said angle being directed downwardly and having a longitudinally extending track therein to accommodate sliding hooks.

13. A rack structure for mounting on a wall and comprising a plurality of similar Wall rack units defining a continuous wall rack with each unit comprising a plurality of supporting brackets each having one end attached to a wall and a supporting surface, an adjustable slide carried by each bracket adjacent the supporting surface thereof, a plurality of spaced tubular rods parallel to said wall to define a shelf on said bracket supporting surfaces and attached to said slides, means for adjustably positioning said slides on their respective brackets to selectively position said rods from said wall, and an aligning member having a cross section similar to the cross section of said tubular rods telescopingly inserted across the ends of adjoining tubular rod of adjoining wallvrack units to 10 align corresponding tubular members of said plurality of wall rack units.

14. A shelf bracket for mounting upon a wall and comprising substantially U-shaped member having the shape of a right triangle with the closed end of the U-shaped cross section defining the hypotenuse, a pair of backing plates secured along one of the legs of the triangularly shaped member between said hypotenuse and the other leg of said member, there being a plurality of notch projections extending from said backing plates for insertion into a pair of parallel rows of slots to secure said bracket leg against a Wall, said U-shaped member being of resilient material with the faces thereof tapering outwardly from the hypotenuse thereof prior to mounting the shelf bracket on the parallel rows of slots, and means interconnecting said bracket faces for urging said bracket faces together after said projections are inserted into corresponding slots to lock said projections therein.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,301,368 4/1919 Boye 211-87 1,613,447 1/ 1927 Elliberg 211-41 1,667,657 4/1928 Dobert 211-87 1,677,764 7/ 1928 Gloekler 312-1404 2,336,670 12/1943 Cavikchiol-i 193-38 2,577,860 12/1951 Schoor 211-123 X 2,622,834 12/ 1952 Sparring 248-243 2,788,888 4/1957 Fisk 211-118 X 2,816,669 12/1957 Schild 108-152 X 2,912,013 11/1959 Freyholdt 28754 2,983,389 5/1961 Trautmann 211-148 3,031,245 4/ 1962 Phillips 312-1404 3,032,160 5/1962 Kay et a1. 193-38 3,167,037 1/1965 Mapson 108-152 X FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

I. T. McCAL-L, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification108/147.17, 108/152, 108/108, 108/29, 248/243
International ClassificationA47G25/06, A47G25/00, A47B96/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/06, A47B96/027
European ClassificationA47G25/06, A47B96/02J