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Publication numberUS3220400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1965
Filing dateDec 14, 1962
Priority dateDec 14, 1962
Publication numberUS 3220400 A, US 3220400A, US-A-3220400, US3220400 A, US3220400A
InventorsYager Harry L
Original AssigneeNorthwest Tube & Metal Fabrica
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stove construction
US 3220400 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 30, 1965 YAGER 3,220,400

STOVE CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 14, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

HARRY L. YAGER BY BUCKHORN, CHEATHAM a BLORE A TTORNEYS Nov. 30, 1965 H. L. YAGER 3,220,400

STOVE CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 14, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 40 J1] 44 Ill El 6O \20 ur 2O Fig. 6

Fig. 7

INVENTOR.

HARRY L. YAGER BY BUCKHORN, CHEATHAM a BLORE ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office Patented Nov. 30, 1965 3,220,400 STOVE CONSTRUCTION Harry L. Yager, Portland, Greg, assignor to Northwest Tube & Metal Fabricators, Portland, reg., a corporation of Oregon Filed Dec. 14, 1962, Ser. No. 247,791 7 Claims. (Cl. 1266) This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 129,575, filed August 7, 1961 for Stove Construction.

My present invention comprises a metal stove.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a free-standing metal stove which may be placed in living quarters as an ornamental feature thereof, the preferred form of the stove being generally known as an facorn stove. A further object of the present invention is to provide a stove of the foregoing character which is made of interfitting parts which may be easily fabricated and assembled to form a variety of final products.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the foregoing character which may be readily assembled into various combinations at the factory, in the shops of distributors and dealers, or at the home of the purchaser.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fireplace stove of high heat efficiency.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a fireplace stove which can be installed against a wall of a room.

The objects and advantages of the present invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings, taken in connection with the following specification, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a view, in perspective, of the present invention in one manner of assembly;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevation of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a vertical section taken substantially along line 6-6 of FIG. 2, on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view, in perspective and on a smaller scale, illustrating each of the component parts of the assembly of FIGS. 1 to 6 inclusive;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary, front elevation view of a fireplace stove forming an alternate embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

The stove comprises a base member 10 in the form of an upwardly open, dished member, formed of three-sixteenth inch plate and deeply drawn so as to comply with normal building codes. The base member is supported on legs 12 preferably arranged in a tripod manner, and is preferably provided with a central ash dump opening 14 with which there is associated a pivoted gate 16. The member 10 terminates in a horizontally disposed, circular rim 18.

Welded to the inner surface of the above member 10, slightly below the rim 18, are a plurality of lugs upon which may be rested a hearth disc 22. The hearth disc is provided with a symmetrically disposed, rectangular grate opening 24 of substantial dimensions with respect to the diameter of the disc, and a plurality of angle bars 26 welded to the edges of the opening provide a continuous flange 28 projecting inwardly from the edges of the opening 24 at a distance below the hearth plate 22.

A grate 30, preferably composed of a plurality of threequarter round bars 32 welded to end plates 34, and upwardly angled transverse angle bars 36 welded to the bars '32 may be dropped into place, resting upon the c011- tinuous flange 28. The grate is of substantial thickness vertically, so that the upper edges of the transverse bars 36 rest substantially in the plane of the hearth disc 22. The longitudinal and lateral dimensions of the grate are slightly less than the corresponding dimensions of the opening 24, so that the edges of the grate are slightly spaced from the edges of the opening.

A fire shell 40 having a regular fireplace type opening at the front, and being open at the bottom, is also rested on the flange 28, the side walls 42 and 44 and rear wall 46 thereof being frictionally wedged between the edges of the grate and the edges of the opening so that the fire shell is firmly retained in proper position. The fire shell has a flue 50 mounted thereon in which there is mounted a damper 52 provided with a conventional operating handle 54. The arrangement is preferably such that the handle 54 may be withdrawn to permit association of an air chamber shell 56 with the assembly. The air chamber shell is attractively formed in acorn shape, having a wide open front which is positioned in surrounding relation to the front opening of the fire shell, and is provided with a circular lower edge 58 of less than a complete circle. An ornamental band 60 is attached to the lower edge of the air chamber shell in downwardly extending relation thereto, so that the band 60 may be frictionally fitted around the rim of the base 10, thus holding the lower edge 58 of the air chamber shell in alignment with the rim 18. The air chamber shell 56 is provided with a flue-encircling sleeve 62, with which may be associated an extension 64 so as to insulate the flue 50 and its extension 66 to thereby protect passersby. A sealing ring 68 is preferably provided to seal off the hollow space between the flue extension 66 and the sleeve extension 64. The walls of the air chamber shell 56 are spaced from the fire shell 40 throughout, so that cold air may enter from the room at the lower front, circulate about the fire shell to be heated, and re-enter the room at the upper front. Additional air may enter through an opening 70 in the rear of the air chamber shell 56, with which is preferably associated a screen 72. A pair of separable fireplace drawscreens 74 may be provided, the same being mounted upon a rod 76 adapted to be attached to brackets 78 mounted on the fire shell 40. An ornamental bar 80 may be conveniently provided to conceal the rod 76.

From the foregoing it will be seen that a variety of different constructions may be easily fromed. In the first place, the base 10 may be utilized along as a portable, open barbecue. Then the base 10 may have the air chamber shell 56 and the extension 64 associated therewith to provide an open barbecue having a smokewithdrawing flue. As another possible combination, the open base may have the removable hearth disc 22 and the removable grill 30 associated therewith. As another combination, the disc and grill may be utilized in combination with the base and air chamber shell. As another combination, the fire shell may be associated with the assembly, and as a final combination the screens may be mounted on the fire shell. I have thus provided a versatile commercial item which permits the sale or use of various combinations of parts as desired.

The fireplace stove shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 is adapted to be installed in a position against a wall of a room and fitting between a ceiling 92 and a floor 94 of the room to resemble a fireplace. The fireplace stove includes a fluted hollow pedestal or base 96 having a front wall 98 and side walls 100 provided with cold air inlet louvers 102. The open back of the base is closed by a heat insulating board 104, a layer 106 of loose, heat r insulating material and a metal plate or wall 108 welded to the side walls 100, the board 104 also being bolted to bracket portions of the base. A bottom heat insulation board 106 is bolted to the bottom of the base. Lag screws 109 screwed into the wall hold the stove against the wall. Downwardly facing side channels 112 and a downwardly facing front channel 114 joined integrally to the side channels form a U-shaped hearth plate 110, the side channels extending back to the wall 90. A U-shaped trim strip 116 is secured to the outer flange of the channels 112 and 114. The hearth plate fits over and rests on the top rim of the base 96.

An ash chamber 120 includes a dished metal cup 122 having coverings 124 and 126 of heat insulation cast on the top and bottom of the cup 122. The sides of the upper, rim portion of the ash chamber are secured to the inner flanges of the side channels 112 by self-tapping screws 128 along with lower edge portions of sides 130 of a firebox or fire shell 132. The back of the upper, rim portion of the ash chamber and back 134 of the firebox 132 are secured to a crossbar 136 by self-tapping screws 138. The crossbar 136 is fixed at its ends to the hearth plate. Thus, the hearth plate supports the ash chamber and the firebox. The sides 130 of the tire box have projections 140 supporting bars 142 of a grate 144 having angle bars 146. The grate may be lifted out of the firebox or tilted for cleaning ashes out of the ash chamber.

The firebox 132 has a forwardly extending hood portion 150, and a damper plate 152 is adapted to open and close top opening 154 in the firebox. A shaft 156 and a handle 158 are operable to position the damper plate.

A fiue adapter 160 of the firebox 132 supports flue section-.162, and the upper end of the flue section 162 forms an annular chamber with annular plate 164, upper portion 166 of hood 168 and the wall 108. An annular plate 170 of a castable type of heat insulation is formed by casting the material into the annular chamber. A flue 172 surrounded by a cover 174 of cast heat insulation extends through the ceiling 92 and the roof. A louvered chimney wrapper 176 and a back, heat insulating board 178 loosely surround the covered flue. An annular, top, heat insulating board 180 is secured at the top of the wrapper in a position abutting the ceiling 92.

Side plates 18?. are spaced outwardly from sides 130 of the firebox 132 to provide for air flow and are welded to the top of the side channels 112, the lower interior portion of the hood 168 and the plate 108. The hood 168 has vents or louvers 186. A trim strip 188 is provided around the lower, rim portion of the hood 168, and the hood is fluted. Screens 192 are slidable on rod 193 supported by the firebox and may be positioned to completely enclose the opening in the front and sides of the firebox.

In the operation of the fireplace stove of FIGS. 8 and 9, the solid fuel is supported on the grate 144 in the firebox 132 and burns thereon. The hot gases travel upwardly to and through the flue 172 and heat the metal firebox 132. Cold air travels by convection into the space around the firebox from the louvers 102 and a passage 194 between the back wall of the ash chamber 120 and the plate 108, and the air travels around and over the heated firebox and is heated thereby. The so heated air travels out into the room through the louvers 186 and under the forward side portions and front portion of the lower edge of the hood 168. The heated air also travels around the firebox and out into the room through at least the top halves of the passages formed by the sidewalls 130 and 182 of the firebox and the hood, respectively, cold air being drawn into the lowermost portions of the last-mentioned passages by convection to add to the flow of air through these heating passages around the firebox. The air flowing around the firebox and out again into the room is heated efficiently by the firebox, and prevents overheating of the hood, the side walls 182, the hearth plate 110 and the base 96.

The fireplace stove of FIGS. 8 and 9 is highly attractive in appearance and is installed easily against any wall of a room, in which position it operates like a fireplace but much more efiiciently and without any danger to the wall, ceiling and floor of the room. The exterior portions of the fireplace stove are cooled so that they are not uncomfortably hot to the touch.

Having illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the invention permits of modification in arrangement and detail. I claim as my invention all such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A stove comprising an upwardly open, dished base member having a circular rim,

legs supporting said base member,

a hearth disc horizontally spanning the interior of said base member,

said hearth disc having a large, rectangular grate opening therein,

flange means on said hearth disc projecting inwardly with respect to the edges of said grate opening below the level of said edges,

a grate resting on said flange means,

said grate having its edges slightly spaced from the respectively adjacent edges of said grate opening, and a forwardly and downwardly open fire shell resting on said flange means,

said shell having side walls and a rear wall,

the lower edge portions of said walls being slidably embraced between the respectively adjacent edges of said grate and said grate opening.

2. A stove com-prising an upwardly open, dished base member having a circular rim,

legs supporting said base member,

a hearth disc horizontally spanning the interior of said base member,

said hearth disc having a large, rectangular grate opening therein,

flange means on said hearth disc projecting inwardly with respect to the edges of said grate opening below the level of said edges,

a grate resting on said flange means,

said grate having its edges slightly spaced from the respectively adjacent edges of said grate opening,

a forwardly and downwardly open fire shell resting on said flange means,

said shell having side walls and a rear wall,

the lower edge portions of said Walls being slidably embraced between the respectively adjacent edges of said grate and said grate opening,

and a forwardly and downwardly open air chamber shell resting upon said base member and spaced from said fire shell throughout.

3. A stove comprising an upwardly open, dished base member having a circular rim,

legs supporting said base member,

a hearth disc horizontally spanning the interior of said base member,

said hearth disc having a large, rectangular grate opening therein,

flange means on said hearth disc projecting inwardly with respect to the edges of said grate opening below the level of said edges,

a grate rest-ing on said flange means,

said grate having its edges slightly spaced from the respectively adjacent edges of said grate opening,

a forwardly and downwardly open fire shell resting on said flange means,

said shell having side walls and a rear wall,

the lower edge portions of said walls being slidably embraced between the respectively adjacent edges of said grate and said grate opening,

a forwardly and downwardly open air chamber shell resting upon said base member and spaced from said fire shell throughout,

and means mounted on the lower edge of said air chamber shell engaging the rim of said base member to retain said air chamber shell in position.

4. In a stove,

an upwardly open, dished ash member,

means for supporting the ash member in a position elevated from a floor,

a hearth plate member having a central ash opening,

means for supporting the hearth plate member in position such that the central ash opening overlies the bottom of the ash member,

a grate covering the ash opening,

a unitary fire shell open at the bottom and front thereof,

having an upwardly extending flue at the upper rear portion thereof, and supported by the hearth plate in a position surrounding the ash opening and spaced inwardly from the side edges and back edges of the hearth plate,

a cup-shaped hood open at the bottom and front,

means for supporting the hood in a position surrounding and spaced from the sides and the back of the fire shell,

the hood having a flue portion surrounding the flue of the fire shell,

screen means covering the front opening of the fire shell,

the hood, the fire shell and the hearth plate defining a heating chamber surrounding substantially the entire sides, the entire back and the entire top of the fir shell, the front opening in the hood being spaced shell is smaller in diameter than the flue portion of the 5 hood and the flue of the fire shell is spaced at all points thereof from the flu'e portion of the hood,

and there is provided a ring member of heat insulation closing the space between the flues.

6. The stove of claim 4 in which the hearth plate has vertical flange mean-s adjacent the opening,

the ash chamber having an upper rim portion overlapping the flange means,

the fire shell having a lower ski-rt portion overlapping the flange means,

and means fastening together the flange means of the hearth plate, the upper rim portion of the ash chamber and the lower skirt portion of the fire shell.

7. The stove of claim 4 including insulating board means covering the back sides of the ash member and the hood.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 146,472 1/ 1874 Phillips r 1 2-663 1,411,132 3/1922 Taylor 126121 1,676,484 7/1928 Ehrlich 126-121 X 11,944,626 :1/1934 Allbert 1-2'66 3 X 2,015,485 9/1935 Lindberg 126-121 X 2,322,016 6/ 1943 Hardeman 126-121 X 3,094,980 6/1963 Inabnit 126-121 JAMES W. WESTHAVER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US146472 *Oct 16, 1873Jan 13, 1874 Improvement in fire-place heaters
US1411132 *Aug 10, 1920Mar 28, 1922Charles C TaylorFireplace
US1676484 *Jul 15, 1926Jul 10, 1928Ehrlich John BFireplace
US1944626 *Nov 14, 1931Jan 23, 1934Eugene A AllbertCombined heater and fireplace
US2015485 *Jun 28, 1933Sep 24, 1935Arvid LindbergFireplace
US2322016 *Sep 19, 1941Jun 15, 1943Hardeman Hardin LFireplace furnace
US3094980 *Jan 23, 1961Jun 25, 1963Daniel Inabuit CharlesFireplace installation for mobile homes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3304931 *Jan 27, 1965Feb 21, 1967Dyna Mfg CoPrefabricated fireplace
US3339540 *Sep 7, 1965Sep 5, 1967Kreider Peter APortable pre-cast fireplace
US3359968 *Oct 1, 1965Dec 26, 1967Thulman Robert DHooded fireplace construction
US3455291 *May 10, 1967Jul 15, 1969Welded Products CoFireplace having adjustable food receptacle and ash receptacle
US3499432 *Mar 8, 1968Mar 10, 1970Hannebaum Harold WHeating unit
US3515122 *Aug 7, 1968Jun 2, 1970Vega Ind IncFireplace
US3664325 *Jul 8, 1970May 23, 1972Malafouris Dannie OSheet metal fireplace
US3809058 *Mar 5, 1973May 7, 1974Becker AFireplace unit
US3880139 *Jun 22, 1973Apr 29, 1975Glenn A YoungTransportable camper fireplace
US3952721 *Jul 10, 1974Apr 27, 1976Patterson Tommy WStove with cooking plate
US3987778 *Jan 8, 1976Oct 26, 1976Brik Michael DAuxiliary fireplace structure
US4112913 *Mar 15, 1977Sep 12, 1978Shimek Ronald JFree standing heating unit
US4167177 *Sep 7, 1976Sep 11, 1979Wigins William HFireplaces
US4216760 *Jun 12, 1978Aug 12, 1980Wiggins William HFireplaces
US4252105 *Nov 9, 1978Feb 24, 1981Johnson Richard BCeramic fireplace
US4519378 *Aug 13, 1981May 28, 1985Mims Philip BHeating device
US5596980 *Jan 11, 1995Jan 28, 1997Yetter Manufacturing CompanyPortable fireplace
US5598834 *Nov 24, 1995Feb 4, 1997Grady; JeffPortable outdoor fireplace with convertible grill feature
US5960788 *Aug 6, 1998Oct 5, 1999Fleming Sales CompanyCollapsible portable outdoor fireplace
US6755188Aug 5, 2002Jun 29, 2004The Coleman Company, Inc.Convertible grill and fireplace
US6851423Oct 28, 2002Feb 8, 2005Ulf J P KlemmingFirepit
US20040069296 *Aug 28, 2003Apr 15, 2004Fpi Fireplace Products International, Ltd.Heat transfer controller
US20100313798 *Jun 9, 2010Dec 16, 2010Andrew MurrayEfficient solid fuel burning appliance
USRE32288 *Sep 12, 1985Nov 18, 1986Ducane Heating CorporationHeat trapping cooking grill
WO1986007127A1 *May 28, 1985Dec 4, 1986Philip B MimsHeating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/531, D23/343, 126/550, 126/25.00R
International ClassificationF24B1/188, F24B1/00, F24B1/181
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/181, F24B1/1885
European ClassificationF24B1/181, F24B1/188F