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Publication numberUS3220418 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1965
Filing dateMar 5, 1962
Priority dateMar 5, 1962
Publication numberUS 3220418 A, US 3220418A, US-A-3220418, US3220418 A, US3220418A
InventorsCohn Charles C
Original AssigneeCohn Charles C, Samuel L Cohn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette
US 3220418 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 30, 1965 c. c. CQHN 3,220,418

CIGARETTE Filed March 5, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 CHARLES C. COHN ATTORNEYS Nov. 30, 1965 Filed March 5, 1962 C. C- COHN CIGARETTE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VENTOR.

CHARLES C. COHN United States Patent 3,220,418 Patented Nov. 30, 1965 3,220,418 CIGARETTE Charles C. Colin, Atlantic City, N.J., assignor to Samuel L. Cohn and Charles C. Cohn, Philadelphia, Pa, a partnership Filed Mar. 5, 1962, Ser. No. 177,479 The portion of the term of the patent subsequent to Apr. 23, 1979, has been disclaimed 3 Claims. (Cl. 1314) The invention relates to a form of cigarette characterized by features which serve to prevent the dropping of ashes from the cigarette and the burning of any surface with which the cigarette comes into contact.

As is well-known, the careless handling of cigarettes, cigars or the like involves many fire hazards as well as general nuisances such as the dropping of ashes on rugs and clothing. The primary danger is that carelessly discarded cigarettes will ignite combustible material and develop into large fires. The scarring of furniture by cigarettes placed thereon and the burning of holes in clothing and rugs by ashes are everyday occurrences.

It is the main object of the invention to avoid the above-mentioned problems. In accordance with the invent'on there is provided a cigarette which will not scar or ignite material with which it comes into contact and from which ashes are prevented from dropping. Briefly, there is provided around the cigarette wrapper an essentZally'non-combustible sheath which retains the ashes, thereby preventing dropping of the ashes, and shields the burning zone from materials which otherwise would be ignited when contacted by the cigarette through carelessness.

A description of this sheath as well as of other details will become apparent from the following description, read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is an axial section of a cigarette constructed according to one form of the invention with the end portion of the cigarette broken away;

' FIGURE 2 is a left end View of the cigarette shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a view of the surface of one form of paper which may be used to form a sheath around the cigarette;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse cross-sectional of the web of paper shown in FIGURE 3, taken as indicated by section lines 44;

FIGURE 5 is an axial section through a cigarette in accordance with an alternative form of the invention;

FIGURE 6 illustrates a further form of the invention with a portion of the cigarette broken away;

FIGURE 7 illustrates a still further form of the invention;

FIGURE 8 is an axial section of another form of cigarette in accordance with this invention;

FIGURE 9 is a'section taken on line 9-9 of FIGURE 8; and

FIGURE 10 is anaxial section of another form of cigarette in accordance with this invention.

A first example of a cigarette according to the invention is illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2. In these figures as well as the examples following in FIGURES 5, 6 and 7, the wrapper W, tobacco T and filter element F are essentially the same as in a conventional cigarette. Sheath S (that form of designation being adopted to distinguish between this form of sheath and the forms S S S S and S described hereafter) extends from the mouthpiece M to the burning end of the cigarette. As evident from FIGURE 2, the sheath S completely encircles the wrapper. A feature of the cigarette shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 is the radial spacing d between major portions of the wrapper W and sheath S This space d is maintained and made uniform throughout the cigarette by means of ribs 2 which protrude from the inside of sheath S These ribs 2, as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, may be formed by embossing in the process of making the paper stock from which sheath S is made. The sheath S preferably is non-combustible or of such nature that combustion thereof proceeds at a substantially slower rate than that of the paper forming wrapper W. This can be effected either by making the sheath S of a material which is substantially heavier than the wrapper or by treating the sheath S with a fireproofing agent. If a fireproofing agent is used it should, of course, be nontoxic to the smoker. A suitable fireproof material for sheath 5, is paper impregnated with a solution ofsilicates, borates or phosphates. Also, paper made up in whole or in part of non-combustible or fire retarding substance is satisfactory, such as paper comprising metal foil, glass fibers, asbestos shreds, etc. A further alternative, to the end that the sheath S will be substantially non-combustible, is the formation of such a sheath from an inorganic material such as Fiberglas. In order that the normal burning of the tobacco T and wrapper W will not be affected by the presence of the outer sheath, the sheath desirably has pores or perforations 5 therein to permit breathing. Although spacing between an outer sheath and an inner cigarette wrapper is effected by ribs 2 extending radially inward from the sheath, it will be understood that the desired spacing rnay be accomplished by the provision of raised ribs or the like on the outside of Wrapper W, or on both the wrapper W and sheath S In the cigarette of FIGURES 1 to 4, the spacing be tween the sheath S and the wrapper W is maintained by the continuous ribs 2. An alternative to this expedient is illustrated in FIGURE 5. The spacing between the sheath and the wrapper W may be achieved by forming depressions 8' in the sheath S to produce dimpled projections 8 on the inside of the sheath. The depressions may take the forms of continuous lines extending circumferentially around the sheath or may be localized points or areas. With the exception of the manner of producing protuberances inside the sheath S the cigarette shown in FIGURE 5 is constructed with respect to other considerations essentially as above-described with reference to the previous figures.

In my copending application, Serial No. 71,868, filed November 18, 1960, now Patent No. 3,030,963, dated April 24, 1962, I have disclosed a cigarette in which insulating protuberances are formed on the wrapper of a cigarette by the intumescent action of a sodium silicate solution applied to the cigarette wrapper. As disclosed therein, the heat generated by the burning of the tobacco causes the silicate to foam up in the form of protuberances which insulate the burning cigarette from any surface, such as furniture, on which it is :placed. This characteristic of silicate solution may be advantageously employed to produce protuberances separating the outer sheath from the cigarette wrapper as contemplated by the present invention. Thus, referring to FIGURE 6, drops of silicate solution are applied to the inside of the sheath S at the points or areas indicated at 4. As burning of the tobacco T progresses and drops of silicate thereby are brought into contact with the burning zone 6, they foam up, or intumesce, into protuberances 4. These protuberances 4' act in the same manner as the previously described ribs 2 and dimples 8. Specific examples of intumescent sodium silicate solutions are given in said copending application. For present purposes, however, certain examples will be given.

The solution should contain at least 14.5% of silicate (SiO in terms of total weight. A specific example of such silicates is a composition having a sodium to silicate ratio, (%Na O:%SiO of 1:2.40 and a Baum reading of 52 at 20 C. A further example is a composition wherein the same ratio is 1:2.00 and having a Ba'um readingof 59 at 20 C.

In the cigarettes in accordance with this invention, it 1s necessary to have a spaced realtionship between the outer sheath and the wrapper during smoking of the cigarette in order to maintain passages for the supply of air required for the continuous burning of the cigarette. In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURE 7, although the sheath S is shown as fitting closely around the wrapper W, means are provided for effecting the necessary spacing between the sheath and the wrapper during the smoking of the cigarette. To this end, drops of silicate solution are applied to the inside of the sheath 8.; as in the case of the FIGURE 6 form of the invention, the points or areas in which these drops are applied being indicated at 9. As the burning of the tobacco T progresses and the drops of silicate are brought into contact with the burning zone, they foam up or intumesce lnto protuberances to thereby force a spaced relationship between the wrapper W and the sheath S Accordingly, passages for the necessary supply of air to support combustion is maintained. A plurality of openings 10 are also provided in the sheath 8,; to provide passageways for the flow of air to the burning zone. Examples of chemicals which may be used to render the sheathfireproof have been previously mentioned and are applicable to FIGURE 7 also. Alternatively, sheath S can be made of a non-combustible material such as Fiberglas. Because of the presence of the sheath 5.; the Wrapper W will tend to burn more slowly than desired and therefore the wrapper is treated with a chemical which will promote combustion. Specifically, this purpose may be served by impregnation of the wrapper with an alkaline nitrate. It will be understood, however, that there are various other known substances that will adequately serve to promote combustion of the wrapper.

In the form of the invention shown in FIGURE 8, the wrapper W and the sheath S are made of crinkled paper, or other suitable material as previously described, so that they have irregular surfaces providing cavities and projections, as best shown in FIGURE 9. Accordingly, small chambers or pockets containing air exist between the inner wall of sheath S and the outer wall of wrapper W thereby to provide an air supply to support burning of the cigarette. Also, a plurality of openings 12 are provided in the sheath S The openings 12 and the air pockets cooperate to provide air passages for the flow of air to the burning zone of the cigarette. It will be noted that either the wrapper W or the sheath, or both may be crinkled in order to provide the desired air pockets. In this form of the invention, the sheath S terminates just short of the end of the cigarette which is to be lighted. This simplifies the initial lighting of the cigarette since there is no interference by the sheath with the lighting of the cigarette.

Referring now to FIGURE 10, wherein another form of the invention is shown, this form lacks any ridges, depressions or the like for spacing the sheath from the cigarette wrapper. In this form the sheath S has a larger inner diameter than the outer diameter of the cigarette wrapper W and is secured at only one location to the cigarette portion, this location being at the tip of the cigarette. It is desirable that the tip of the cigarette has an enlarged diameter, as by providing a mouthpiece M which has an outer diameter greater than the wrapper W. In this form, the sheath S hangs relatively loosely over the wrapper W. By reason of the difference in the diameters of the sheath and wrapper, there is an annular passageway therebetween for the passage of air. Of course, a portion of this passageway may be closed at a circumferential location where the wrapper and the sheath are in contact; however, there will always be a substantial portion of the annular passageway which is open. In addition, the sheath S may be provided with small openings therethrough to the burning zone. The sheath S and the wrapper Ware constructed of material as in the case the previous forms of the invention described above.

In the use of any of the above-described cigarettes the outer sheath serves to encase the cigarette ashes and thereby prevent them from dropping to the floor or onto furniture. The outer sheath is completely or substantially non-combustible and provides an insulation around the burning zone so that furniture cannot be scarred or fires started by careless handling of the cigarette.

It will be understood that various departures from the specifically disclosed embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the scope thereof as defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A cigarette or the like comprising as elements a cylindrical combustible wrapper. containing tobacco and a sheath extending circumferentially around said wrapper in spaced relation thereto, said sheath being relatively non-combustible as compared with the wrapper and having small openings therein to provide for the flow of air to the burning zone of the cigarette, at least one of said elements having applied thereto in the space between the elements an intumescent substance, said intumescent substance comprising deposits of a sodium silicate solution having a sodium to silicate ratio of approximately 1:2 and a Baum reading of approximately 59 at 20 C., said deposits being distributed in spaced relation throughout the surface of the elements having the deposits applied thereto whereby under the influence of the heat of burning of the wrapper said deposits will intumesce to separate said wrapper and said sheath and provide passageways for the supply of combustion airfor supporting combustion of the wrapper and the tobacco.

2. A cigarette or the like comprising as elements a cylindrical combustible wrapper containing tobacco and a sheath extending circumferentially around said wrapper in spaced relation thereto, said sheath being relatively non-combustible as compared with the wrapper and having small openings therein to provide for the flow of air to the burning zone of the cigarette, at least one of said elements having applied thereto in the space between the elements an intumescent water soluble alkali metal silicate, said intumescent substance comprising deposits of a sodium silicate solution having at least 14.5% silicate by weight, a sodium to silicate ratio of approximately 1:2.4 and a Baurn reading of approximately 59 at 20 C., said deposits being distributed in spaced relation throughout the surface elements having the deposits applied thereto whereby under the influence of the heat of burning of the wrapper said deposits will intumesce to separate said wrapper and said sheath and provide passageways for the supply of combustion air for supporting combustion of the wrapper and the tobacco.

3. A cigarette or the like comprising as elements a cylindrical combustible wrapper containing tobacco and a sheath extending circumferentially around said wrapper, said sheath being relatively non-combustible as compared with the wrapper and having small openings therein to provide for the flow of air to the burning zone of the cigarette, at least one of said elements having applied thereto on the surface opposed to the surface of the other element an intumescent water soluble alkali metal silicate said intumescent substance comprising deposits of a sodium silicate solution having a sodium to silicate ratio of approximately 1:2 and a Baum reading of approximately 59 at 20 C., said deposits being distributed in spaced relation throughout the surface of the elements having the deposits applied thereto whereby under the influence of the heat of burning of the wrapper said deposits bacco.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Holsman 1314 Low 1314 Finnell 134 Miller 131175 6 2,625,163 6/1953 Jones et a1. 131-175 2,701,571 2/1955 Dittrich 131- 175 2,827,059 3/1958 Czap 131-175 3,030,963 4/1962 Cohn 131 175 5 FOREIGN. PATENTS 340,884 1/1931 Great Britain.

ABRAHAM G. STONE, Primary Examiner.

10 MELVIN D. REIN, Examiners.

Patent Citations
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US1905416 *Jan 19, 1931Apr 25, 1933Low Albert HCigarette
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GB340884A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3409021 *Nov 7, 1967Nov 5, 1968Owaki KenichiReduced tar content cigarette
US3886954 *Mar 13, 1974Jun 3, 1975Hannema Johannes HermanusFire safety cigarette
US4187862 *Jul 17, 1978Feb 12, 1980Cohn Charles CTreatment of cigarette paper
US4452259 *Jul 10, 1981Jun 5, 1984Loews Theatres, Inc.Smoking articles having a reduced free burn time
US4574821 *Mar 22, 1984Mar 11, 1986Philip Morris IncorporatedExpanded wrapper and smoking articles including same
US4691717 *Aug 30, 1984Sep 8, 1987Dynic CorporationCigarettes
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US4854331 *Nov 20, 1985Aug 8, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySmoking article
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US8267096Apr 13, 2010Sep 18, 2012Rothmans, Benson & Hedges, Inc.Low sidestream smoke cigarette with combustible paper
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DE19636665A1 *Sep 10, 1996Mar 12, 1998Juergen HerzogSpecially prepared ash deposit device for cigarettes, cigars or cigarillos
DE19636665C2 *Sep 10, 1996Sep 16, 1999Juergen HerzogAscheaufbewahrungsgegenstand für Tabakartikel, wie Zigaretten oder Zigarillos
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Classifications
U.S. Classification131/349, 131/175
International ClassificationA24D1/12, A24D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24D1/12
European ClassificationA24D1/12