Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3220879 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1965
Filing dateJul 29, 1964
Priority dateMay 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3220879 A, US 3220879A, US-A-3220879, US3220879 A, US3220879A
InventorsHarold J Reindl, Donald E Stare, Donald R Strack
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealing strip comprising polychloroprene rubber base coated with composition consisting essentially of silicone gum and chlorinated sulfonated polyethylene
US 3220879 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patetit SEALING STRIP COMPRISING POLYCHLORO- PRENE RUBBER BASE COATED WITH COMPO- SITION CONSISTING ESSENTIALLY F SILI- CONE GUM AND CHLORINATED SULFONATED POLYETHYLENE Donald E. Stare, Donald R. Strack, and Harold J. Reindl,

Dayton, Ohio, assignors to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Original application May 19,1960, Ser.

No. 30,078. Divided and this application July 29, 1964, Ser. No. 386,054

2 Claims. (Cl. 117--138.8)

The invention relates to slip coatings and is particularly concerned with slip coatings that exhibit a high degree of elongation.

This invention is a division of copending application Serial No. 30,078, filed May 19, 1960.

Slip coatings for elastomeric parts may be defined as cover coats which generally seal the surface of an elastomeric part and which improve the wear characteristics of the part to which they are applied.

The conventional slip coating is compatible with the base elastomer and is, in effect, a solvent type, pigmented cement coated onto the elastomer to form a coextensive outer surface. Compounding of this slip coating may be useful to improve abrasion resistance, lessen friction, change color, etc. In all instances, in the past, it has been our experience that the slip coat lacks the ability to stretch with the elastomeric part due to the loading. This causes rupture of the coating when the elastomer is stretched'beyond the limit of elongation'of the coating. Commercially available slip coatings rarely will elongate more than 100% thus limiting their usefulness.

The present invention is directed to a greatly improved slip coating which will elongate in the order of 600% without rupture and which presents a slick surface that slips well to reduce friction and lessen noise. Thefcoating is used to great advantage on door sealing'strips to decrease wear, resist abrasion and to lessen noise due to friction. It is apparent that the slip coat is also useful for many other applications.

The main object of the invention is, therefore, to provide a slip coating for elastomeric parts which comprises essentially a major portion of a rubbery ingredient together with methyl silicone gum in lesser quantities in a solvent solution with or without additional ingredients.

This coating may be applied to any of the known elastomers whether foamed or solid to provide an impervious stretchable coating that has excellent antifriction properties. We have had excellent results with the coating on parts formed from vinyls such as polyvinyl chloride, polychloroprene (neoprene), butyl rubber, natural rubber, polyurethanes, butadiene styrene copolymer rubber (GR-S), butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer rubber (GR-N), chlorinated sulfonated polyethylene such as Hypalon, foams of the foregoing and compatible mixtures thereof. In all cases, the coating is flexible and will elongate up to 600% without rupture.

The rubbery ingredient used as the base for the cement may be chlorinated rubber, neoprene, butyl, GR-S, Hypalon, polyurethane, etc. The base is preferably similar to the elastomer to which the cement is ultimately applied but this is not essential and, in some cases, for example, where heavy service is to be encountered, it is desirable to use a more rugged base. For example, on foamed natural rubber strips, a neoprene or Hypalon coating offers better wear, etc.

The important ingredient in the coating is the silicone gum. The use of gum is of great importance since silicone oils, and resins do not provide the desired result.

The gum, however, is believed to persent greater slickness due to its relative incompatibility with the polymeric base and this leads to bleeding which enhances the lubricat ing qaulities of the coating.

Furthermore, gums do-not-interfere with subsequent painting operations since they do not transfer readily to contacting surfaces. This may also have a bearing on the long life available as an anti-friction surface. Further, gums do not lessen the physicalproperties ofthe rubbery base materials. Gums being solids by nature are not as transient as oils.

The silicone gum is the important addition to the slip coat and the ingredient that imparts the high physicals noted. This gum is a devolatilized methyl vinyl silicone polymer having a very high molecular weight in the order of 200,000. The gum has a plasticity of from l15-170 measured by A.S.T.M. procedure D #926. The vinyl group is present in quantities of about .2 mol percent. The molecule including the vinyl group is represented in part by the following structural formula:

This gum may be used in quantities of from 5% to 30% of the rubbery base according to the rubbery ingredient selected. For example, the acrylics and nitrocellulose base cements are better when the gum is on the low side, between 5% to 8%, while the remaining elastomers function better between 10% to 30% with 20% being generally preferred.

The slip coat recipe may also include reinforcing agents, antiaging materials; stabilizers, softeners, etc., and vulcanizing agentsand accelerators where'necessary together with organic solvents as noted in the following formulas. In all instances, it is to be understood that the specific formulations may be varied widely with respect to the above materials according to the desired results, In a number of the recipes to follow, various solvents are used in combination and it is understood that, in each instance, these combinations are preferred to improve solution and control the drying of the slip coat. It is understood that single solvents maybe used although, in some of these instances, the compounding of the slip coatand the coat ing and drying characteristics thereofare not as easily controlled. Examples of slip coats which may be used with a high degree of success embodying different rubbery ingredients are as follows.-

Example 1.Acrylic type Parts Methyl metha'crylate ester resin (30% solids) 45.0 Titanium dioxide 45.0 Cellosolve acetate 10.0

These ingredients are ground together and are gradually diluted with a mixture of:

Silicone gum 4.5

All parts are by weight. The ester resin is originally cut to 30% solids with the solvent noted above. The coating material has a spray viscosity of 11 sec. (#4 Ford).

3,220,879 Patented Nov.'. 30, 1965 g 3 Example 2.-Nitrcellul0se type Parts A see. nitrocellulose (65% solids in ethyl alcohol) 85.0 Castor oil alkyd resin 192.0 Modifiedmaleic rosin ester 40.0 De-waxed shellac 23.0 Dibutyl phthalate 36.0 Methyl ethyl ketone 27.0 Methyl isobutyl carbinol 16.0 Methyl isobutyl ketone 216.0 Isopropyl acetate 19.0 Toluene 117.0 Silicone gum 21.0

All ingredients are mixed in solvents to free flowing consistency. All parts are by weight.

Example 3.-Nitrocellul0se type Parts /2 sec. nitrocellulose (70% solids in ethyl alcohol) 109.0 Castor oil alkyd resin 150.0 Modified maleic rosin ester 32.0 Dibutyl phthalate 19.0 Methyl isobutyl ketone 163.0 Isopropyl acetate 28.0 Methyl isobutyl carbinol 28.0 Toluene 235.0 Silicone gum 40.0

This is mixed the same as Example 2 and all parts are by weight.

Example 4.-Chlorinated, sulfonateal polyethlene type Parts Chlorinated, sulfonated polyethylene (Hypalon #20) 100.0 Silicone gum 20.0 Furnace black 5.0 Channel black 2.5 Graphite 10.0 Limestone 5.0 Silicone dioxide 16.0 Hydrogenated wood rosin 2.5 2mercaptoimidazoline 4.0 Mineral oil (light process Circo) 10.0 All of the ingredients except the Hypalon and silicone gum are mixed for sixteen hours in a ball mill with xylol sufiicient to create a slurry. The Hypalon and silicone gum are then added and mixed with additional xylon to bring the recipe to about 18% solids. All percentages and parts expressed by weight.

Example 5.Ne0prene type Parts Polychloroprene (neoprene) 100.0 Silicone gum 20.0 Channel black 7 5.0 Magnesium oxide 2.0 Tertiary butylm'etacresol 2.0 Stearic acid 0.5 Zinc oxide 5.0 Sulfur 4.0

The above ingredients are mixed and dissolved in xylol sufiicient to bring the recipe to 18% solids. All percentages and parts are expressed by weight.

Example 6.Butyl type Parts Butyl rubber (#1 65) 100.0 Carbon black 70.0

Limestone 15.0

Paraflin wax 43.0

These ingredients are thoroughly milled together and the These ingredients are dissolved in sufficient xylol in a mixer to bring the final mixture to about 18% solids content. All percentages and parts are by Weight.

The butyl rubber noted is the commercially available rubbery grade comprising a polymer of isobutylene and isoprene.

Example 7.-GRS type Parts Butadiene styrene rubbery copolymer (GR-S #1009) 100.0 2,2 methylene-bis (4 methyl-6-tertbutylphenol)-a 2.0 Nickel dibutyl dithiocarbamate 2.0 Microcrystalline wax 4.0 Furnace black 40.0 Carbon black 35.0 Zinc oxide 5.0 Stearic acid 7.0 Petrolatum amber 5.0 Magnesium oxide 2.0

These ingredients are mixed together on a mill or in a mixer and are termed GR-S Master in the recipe to follows:

' Parts GR-S Master 189.0 Limestone 35.0 High milecular weight hydrocarbon oil with aromatically in chain 20.0 Mineral oil (light process Circo) 10.0 Zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate 2.0 Sulfur 1.75 Silicone gum 20.0

These ingredients are dissolved in xylol sutficient to bring the solids content to about 18%. All percentages and parts are expressed by weight.

It is apparent that, in all cases, the slip coat may be applied to the rubbery base by brushing, spraying, dipping or How coating and that the viscosity of the slip coat will determine to some degree the thickness of the layer. If desired, repeated applications may be used to build up the desired thickness of layer. s

In general, a coating having an average thickness of from 0.0002 to 0.002" is most useful and a layer in this range made by any of the above seven recipes will be capable of extreme elongation of the layer and the strip to which it is adhered without rupture. Furthermore, because of-- the stretchability of this gum layer, there is no tendency for the coextensivity of bond to be disturbed.

We have found a coating, as noted in Example 4, is particularly useful as a coating for a foamy natural rubber sealing strip of the type shown and described in Harris patent 2,579,072. A strip of this design, attached to an automotive door and coated with a .0006" thick layer of the slip coat set forth in Example 4, showed no signs of wear after 50,000 door slams and, likewise, the door closed silently and without squeak due to the lubricated surface provided by the slip coat. A'similar test, conducted under identical conditions wherein the strip was coated with Hypalon cement (.0006" thick) without the silicone gum addition gave evidence of abrasive Wear which disrupted'the coating. Furthermore, squeaks were in evidence due to the frictional characteristics of the strip. In addition, portions of the two test strips showed the one coated with the improved slip coat could be stretched up to six times its length without, in any way, causing injury to the slip coat while the strip coated with the Hypalon cement showed fissures in the coating after 95% elongation.

It is to be understood that the important and necessary ingredients in the slip coat are the rubbery component, the methyl silicone gum and the solvent carrier. To this may be added pigments in moderate quantities and stabilizers, anti-oxidants, curing agents, plasticizers, processing mediums and aids, etc., as are well known in the rubber compounding art. These added ingredients improve processing, curing and aging and, in general, help yield a commercial product. However, since the additions of these materials may vary widely and various equivalents may be used with equal success, it is apparent that our basic invention is directed to the concept of utilizing the silicone gum in the slip coat to improve stretcha-bility and maintain low friction qualities.

The slip coat described herein may be applied directly to the rubbery surface of the part or to a coated surface wherein a sealing coat or other rubbery covering has been previously applied.

While the embodiments of the present invention as herein disclosed constitute preferred forms, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A sealing strip adapted to seal a closure member to a frame member and to be carried by one of said members, said sealing strip being flexed upon each opening and closing movement of said closure member and consisting essentially of a polychloroprene rubber base and a slip coat coextensively covering the entire external surface thereof and consisting essentially of an initially fluid, chlorinated, sulfonated polyethylene cement including devolatilized methyl vinyl silicone gum having a very high molecular weight of about 200,000 and containing about .2 mol percent of vinyl group therein in quantities of about 20% by weight of the chlorinated, sulfonated polyethylene used and dispersed throughout the cement in an uncured condition, said polymer being capable of bleeding to the surface of the coating for enhancing the lubrication qualities thereof.

2. A sealing strip adapted to seal a closure member to a frame member and to be carried by one of said members, said sealing strip being flexed upon each opening and closing movement of said closure member and consisting essentially of a polychloroprene rubber base and a slip coat coextensively covering the entire external surface thereof and consisting essentially of an initially fluid, chlorinated, slufonated polyethylene cement including devolatilized methyl vinyl silicone gum having a very molecular weight of about 200,000 and containing about .2 mol percent of a vinyl group therein in quantities of between 10% and 30% by weight of the chlorinated, sulfonated polyethylene used and dispersed throughout the cement in an uncured condition, said polymer being capable of bleeding to the surface of the coating for enhancing the lubricating qualities thereof.

No references cited.

JOSEPH L. SCHOFER, Primary Examiner.

JAMES A. SEIDLECK, Examiner.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4151319 *Jan 12, 1978Apr 24, 1979United Merchants And Manufacturers, Inc.Method for making a pressure sensitive adhesive coated laminate
US7754800Apr 3, 2006Jul 13, 2010Dow Corning Europe SaOrganosiloxane compositions
US8022162Apr 3, 2006Sep 20, 2011Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8067519Apr 3, 2006Nov 29, 2011Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8076411Apr 3, 2006Dec 13, 2011Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8084535Apr 3, 2006Dec 27, 2011Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8088857Jul 13, 2010Jan 3, 2012Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8153724Apr 3, 2006Apr 10, 2012Dow Corning CorporationOrganosiloxane compositions
US8344087Sep 27, 2011Jan 1, 2013Dow Corning CorporationHydrosilylation cured organosiloxanes having diluent therein
US8487037Mar 18, 2010Jul 16, 2013Dow Corning CorporationPreparation of organosiloxane polymers
US8735493Mar 18, 2010May 27, 2014Dow Corning CorporationPreparation of organosiloxane polymers
US20080284106 *Apr 3, 2006Nov 20, 2008Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
US20080312365 *Apr 3, 2006Dec 18, 2008Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
US20080312366 *Apr 3, 2006Dec 18, 2008Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
US20090215944 *Apr 3, 2006Aug 27, 2009Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
US20090234052 *Apr 3, 2006Sep 17, 2009Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
US20110003081 *Jul 13, 2010Jan 6, 2011Isabelle MatonOrganosiloxane Compositions
EP0093918A1 *Apr 22, 1983Nov 16, 1983Teroson GmbHSealing composition based on butyl rubber and/or polyisobutylene
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/447, 428/451, 428/495
International ClassificationC09J123/34, C08L21/00, C08L33/12, C08L23/34, C08J7/04, C09J123/22, C08L23/22
Cooperative ClassificationC08J7/047, C08L21/00, C09J123/22, C08L23/22, C08J2321/00, C08L23/34, C08J7/04, C08L11/00, C09J123/34, C08L33/12
European ClassificationC08J7/04, C08J7/04L, C08L23/34, C08L21/00, C08L23/22, C08L33/12, C09J123/34, C09J123/22, C08L11/00