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Publication numberUS3221522 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1965
Filing dateJan 23, 1962
Priority dateJan 26, 1961
Also published asDE1213947B
Publication numberUS 3221522 A, US 3221522A, US-A-3221522, US3221522 A, US3221522A
InventorsNebel Max Bruno
Original AssigneeHanes Hosiery Mills Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circular knit stockings
US 3221522 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` Dec- 7, 1965 M. B. NEBEL 3,221,522 g CIRCULAR KNIT STOGKINGS Filed Jan. 23, 1962 FIG. .l

n l.'.\ ll'.\ l Thil JHQw/ BY @Je @Jl United States Patent O 3,221,522 CIRCULAR KNIT STOCKINGS Max Bruno Nebel, Wiesbaden, Germany, assgnor to Hanes Hosiery Mills Company, Winston-Salem, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed Jan. 23, 1962, Ser. No. 168,140

Claims priority, application Germany, Jan. 26, 1961,

N 19,488 2 Claims. (Cl. (S6- 185) This invention relates generally to circular knit stockings, and particularly to improvements in the sole, heel and high heel parts of circular knit ladies stockings.

The object of the invention is to suitably reinforce the sole, heel and high heel parts of circular knit ladies stockings without introducing special reinforcing threads, whereby to eliminate the unsightly appearance of cut-otf thread ends at the peripheries of said parts.

Another object is to provide such a stocking with fabric which is run proof, and with a heel part which has ample ductility.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent when the following description is read with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged view looking at the inner face of the fabric within the rectangular arca X in FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the foot of the stocking;

FIG. 3 is a view showing a modified stitch arrangement; and

FIG. 4 is a view showing another modified stitch arn rangement.

lReferring particularly to FIG. 1, the fabric zone P, to the right of line u, illustrates the stitch formation in the reinforced fabric parts, and the fabric Zone O, to the left of line u, illustrates the stitch formation in the unreinforced parts. The fabric zone O preferably is plain knit with two threads a and b, which extend into the part F of the fabric zone P to be formed into enlarged double thread stitches A and B on one side of the line k, and into the part S of the zone P to be formed into enlarged single thread stitches M and N on the opposite side of the line k.

The threads a and b are each formed into conventional stitches c throughout the zone O, and below the line k each pair of successive threads a and b extend across the line u and throughout the part F and are formed into double thread stitches in alternate wales. For example, two adjacent threads a and b combine in the part F to form double thread stitches A in alternate wales, while each of said threads a and b combines in the part F with the next adjacent thread a or b to form double thread stitches B in intervening wales. The stitches A and B preferably are approximately twice as long as the stitches c.

The stitches A and B are staggered in relation to each other, as shown, in consequence of which the sinker stitches V run obliquely, thus making a strong cross connection. Because of the large double thread stitches, and of their staggered relation, the fabric has large openings, in consequence of which it is especially suitable as reinforced fabric for a heel part F. Thus the double thread staggered stitch arrangement is worked into the heel part F, i.e., between lines y and k in the longitudinal direction and to line u in the transverse direction. It should be noted that, as shown, the heel part F is greater in width than normal heel parts.

Above the line k each thread a and b extends across the line u and throughout the part S and is formed into single thread stitches in alternate wales. The stitches formed of the threads a and b, respectively designated M and N, are staggered relative to each other, as shown, so

3,221,522 Patented Dec. 7, 1965 that alternate wales contain only stitches M and intervening wales contain only stitches N. The portion T between two successive stitches M floats across a stitch N in the intervening Wale, and the portion T between ytwo successive stitches N floats across a stitch M in the intervening Wale. Thus the single thread staggered stitch arrangement affords two plain looped fabrics worked into each other, i.e., a so-called single panel interlocked fabric.

Such a fabric is considerably more durable than the conventional single thread fabric, in consequence of which it is particularly suitable for the sole part S and high heel part H.

It should be noted that the change from the heel part F made of two thread stitches A, B to the sole part S made of single thread stitches N, M, at the courses designated a', b', is effected so that the staggered relation of the stitches is not interrupted. It should also be noted that the change from the high heel part H made of single thread stitches N, M to the heel part F made of two thread stitches A, B is effected so that the staggered relation of the stitches is not interrupted.

Fabric made of stitches N and M is capable of considerably more longitudinal dilatation than a single panel looped fabric, and it is capable of greater longitudinal dilatation than fabric made of stitches A and B. At the same time, when the fabric is stretched longitudinally it has a strong tendency to contract circumferentially, which is an advantage. The reason is to be found in the presence of the floating thread portions T between the stitches. It is possible for the stitches N, M to attain approximately double the length of stitches c without initially being formed longer than the stitches c, the extra thread going into the stitches N, M being drawn from the floating thread portions T. If desired, of course, the stitches N, M may be drawn longer than the stitches c. For example, when stitches A, B of the adjoining heel part F are not drawn twice as long as the stitches c, the stitches N, M are advantageously drawn longer to compensate for this.

A stocking knit in accordance with the invention keeps its shape. For example, a tubular stocking blank may be knit with sole part S, heel part F and high heel part H all of the same width. After the toe part E is knit, trimmed and seamed, as at Z, the heel is shaped, in consequence of which the fabric expands beyond the dotted line d, as required to afford the desired shape. In spite of the fact that the parts S, F and H are initially of the same width in the tubular blank, the stocking holds its shape and gives a good appearance along line u.

The stocking parts, of course, may be worked in different shapes. For example, like the shape of the high heel H', or of the sole part S'.

Referring particularly to FIG. 3, the modified stitch arrangement is characterized by double thread stitches B and single thread stitches N, M worked together in the saine fabric area. The fabric comprises double thread stitches A in alternate wales and double thread stitches B in intervening wales, each of these stitches being formed of a pair of the threads a, b, as shown. Between the stitches A in each of the alternate wales are single thread stitches M formed of one of the threads a, and between the stitches B in each of the intervening wales are single thread stitches N formed of one of the threads b. Thus the stitches A, B are staggered relative to each other and the stitches N, M are staggered relative to each other, while all of the stitches A, B, N and M are worked together in the same fabric area.

The fabric knit in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 3 is practically run proof and is advantageously used for the sole, heel, high heel and toe parts of the stocking.

Referring particularly to FIG. 4, the second modified stitch arrangement is characterized by double thread stitches A and single thread stitches N worked together in the same fabric area. The fabric comprises double thread stitches A in alternate wales, and single thread stitches N in intervening wales, each of the stitches A being made of a part of the threads a, b, and each of the stitches N being made of one of the threads b, as shown. Each of the alternate wales is made up of a solid row of stitches A, and each of the intervening wales is made up of a solid row of stitches N. Each thread part T floats across a stitch N.

The fabric knit in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 4 is advantageously used for the sole, heel and high heel parts of the stocking.

It will be understood, of course, that the present invention, as described and shown, is susceptible to various changes and modifications which may be made without any departure from the general principles or real spirit of the invention. Accordingly, it is intended to claim the present invention broadly, as Well as specically, as indicated in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as follows:

1. In a ladys stocking rotary knitted throughout the leg and foot thereof,

(a) an instep portion composed of a rst thread in alternate courses and a second thread in the intervening courses,

(b) a heel portion contiguous with the instep portion wherein the two threads are formed into double thread knitted loops in alternate wales in alternate courses and into double thread knitted loops in the intervening wales in the intervening courses, and

(c) a sole portion contiguous with both the instep portion and the heel portion wherein one thread is formed into knitted loops in alternate wales in alternate courses and floated across the intervening wales, and wherein the other thread is formed into knitted loops in the intervening wales in the intervening courses and oated across the alternate wales.

2. The stocking of claim 1 further having a high heel portion contiguous with both the instep portion and the heel portion wherein one thread is formed into knitted loops in alternate wales in alternate courses and floated across the intervening wales, and wherein the other thread is formed into knitted loops in the intervening wales in the intervening courses and floated across the alternate wales.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,819,958 8/1931 Lochhead 66-182 2,379,649 7/1945 Nebel 66-l69 FOREIGN PATENTS 750,891 6/1933 France.

366,180 2/1932 Great Britain.

834,560 5/1960 Great Britain.

578,115 6/1958 Italy.

RUSSELL C. MADER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1819958 *Jul 29, 1930Aug 18, 1931Charles R HendersonStocking
US2379649 *Sep 16, 1937Jul 3, 1945Nebel MaxKnit fabric and method of making the same
FR750891A * Title not available
GB366180A * Title not available
GB834560A * Title not available
IT578115B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3298205 *Jul 23, 1962Jan 17, 1967Reymes Reymes-Cole Bernard ThoKnitted footwear
US3318112 *Dec 21, 1964May 9, 1967Nittex A GLady's stocking manufactured on a circular knitting machine
US3338071 *Jan 30, 1964Aug 29, 1967Truette H BairdSeamless hosiery heel and method of forming same
US3457735 *Jul 10, 1963Jul 29, 1969Scott & Williams IncKnitting methods and machines
US3457737 *Sep 1, 1966Jul 29, 1969Scott & Williams IncKnitted products
US3546900 *May 6, 1968Dec 15, 1970Kendall & CoTubular-knitted elastic stocking with differentially knitted instep and heel
US3685321 *Aug 15, 1968Aug 22, 1972Scott & Williams IncCircular knitting machine
US3757539 *Dec 17, 1970Sep 11, 1973Scott & Williams IncStocking with two ply toe
US3841113 *May 14, 1973Oct 15, 1974Schubert & Salzer MaschinenMethod of knitting stocking toe closure
US4000630 *May 22, 1973Jan 4, 1977Burlington Industries, Inc.Seamless panty hose and method
US5840233 *Sep 16, 1997Nov 24, 1998Optimer, Inc.Process of making melt-spun elastomeric fibers
US6277942May 19, 1998Aug 21, 2001Optimer, Inc.Melt-spun elastomeric fibers and the preparation thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/185
International ClassificationD04B1/06, D04B9/46
Cooperative ClassificationD04B9/46, D04B1/06, D04B1/26
European ClassificationD04B9/46, D04B1/06, D04B1/26