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Publication numberUS3221781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1965
Filing dateSep 5, 1963
Priority dateSep 12, 1962
Also published asDE1272592B, DE1498857A1, DE1498857B2, US3186556
Publication numberUS 3221781 A, US 3221781A, US-A-3221781, US3221781 A, US3221781A
InventorsGosta Forsstrom Bo
Original AssigneeLkb Produkter Aktiebolag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sample collector
US 3221781 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. G. FORSSTROM SAMPLE COLLECTOR Filed Sept. 5. 1963 United States Patent 3,221,781 SAMPLE COLLECTGR Bo Giista Forsstriim, Mariehall, Sweden, assignor to LKB-Produkter Aktiebolag, Stockholm, Sweden, :1 company of Sweden Filed Sept. 5, 1963, Ser. No. 306,946 Claims priority, application Sweden, Sept. 12, 1962, 9,873/62 Claims. (Ci. 141-430) The invention relates to a sample collector, i.e. an apparatus for distributing a flow of a fiuid to a plurality of receptacles, and particularly a flow of a liquid, having a composition which changes in time. As an example, such a sample collector can be used together with a device for chromatographic analysis or separation, in which the liquid from said device shall be distributed into a plurality of vessels for being analyzed.

In a usual design of a sample collector the receptacles, usually test tubes, are arranged in several concentric circles on a circular, rotatable table. The table is rotated step by step, and the filling nozzle for the liquid is moved in a radial direction from one circle of test tubes to another. The main object of the invention is to provide a sample collector which is more compact than a sample collector of said known type, i.e. requires less space, and which makes it possible to use a stationary filling nozzle; the test tubes shall be responsible for the relative movement between the filling nozzle and the test tubes.

One embodiment of the invention comprises a rectangular base; on said base spaces for receiving a plurality of holders; rectangular elongated holders provided on said base in all said spaces but one, said holders being arranged in two rows on the base, each holder being arranged to receive a plurality of receptacles for the samples; means for moving the extreme holder of each row to the other row in a step by step movement; and means for moving all holders of each row in the longi tudinal direction of the row. This embodiment can serve one filling station. In another embodiment of the invention holders are provided on the base in all spaces but two. This embodiment can serve two filling stations, as will be described hereinbelow with reference to the accompanying drawing.

The illustrated device consists of a rectangular base 1 on which there are provided elongated box-shaped holders 2 arranged to receive test tube racks 3, each rack containing ten test tubes. The holders are arranged in two rows, and each row can contain sixteen holders, at most. Actually, each row contains fifteen holders only. This makes it possible for the extreme holder in each row to be moved in its longitudinal direction to the empty space in the other row. In the illustrated position the extreme holders 4 and 5 are being moved from one row to the other in the direction indicated by the arrows.

When the test tubes are being filled they are in the positions indicated 6 and 7. Above said test tubes there are filling nozzles for a liquid, for example from a chromatographic apparatus. Consequently, the illustrated device can serve two columns simultaneously.

The holders are pushed from one row to the other by members 8 and 9, illustrated in a simplified way, ar ranged to move the holders simultaneously and step by step, each step being equal to the distance between the centers of two adjacent test tubes. When the last test tubes in the holders 4 and 5 have been filled in the positions 6 and 7 the members 3 and 9 move the double distance, thus pushing said last test tubes from the positions 6, 7 directly to the positions 14, 15. There is no reason for letting the last test tubes stop in the po- Patented Dec. 7, 1965 ice sitions 12, 13. The holders can be moved at pre-determined intervals. Alternatively, they can be moved when an auxiliary container which is connected to the filling nozzle has been filled with liquid, all test tubes being thus filled with equal quantities of liquid. These principles for filling the test tubes, and the automatic means used for such filling, are well known in the chromatographic technique and shall not be explained here.

All the holders of each row are moved step by step by members 10 and 11, illustrated in a simplified way. In each step the holders are moved a distance equal to the width of one holder.

The operating devices for the members 8, 9, 10 and 11 are synchronized in a known way to the effect that members 19 and 11 come into operation as soon as members 8 and 9 have finished pushing the extreme holders 4 and 5 from one row to the other.

In order to make the illustrated apparatus as compact as possible it is desired that the holders and the test tube racks are as narrow as possible. In order to make such elongated, narrow test tube racks stand steadily after having been removed from the sample collector they consist of two parts interconnected by a hinge. Each part contains five test tubes. When the rack is to be placed on a table the two parts are turned to make an angle with each other.

The illustrated apparatus can be modified so as to contain 31 holders instead of 30. Suppose that the filling occurs in position 7. The test tubes in holder 5 are filled as described. Thereafter holder 5 is pushed to the righthand row, the left-hand row is pushed downward one step, the uppermost holder in the right-hand row is rapidly pushed to the left, and the right-hand row is pushed upward one step. Consequently, such an apparatus can serve one filling station only.

What is claimed is:

1. A sample collector comprising a rectangular base, spaces arranged in a first row and a second row on said base for receptacle holders, rectangular elongated receptacle holders arranged in a first row and a second row on said base in all of said spaces excepting one vacant end space in said second row of spaces, a plurality of open receptacles arranged in a row in each receptacle holder, means for moving a receptacle holder from one end position in said first row of receptacle holders to said vacant end space in said second row of spaces in a step by step movement, means for moving each row of receptacle holders separately in the longitudinal direction thereof, means for moving a receptacle holder from the opposite end position in said second row of receptacle holders to a vacant end space at the opposite end of said first row of spaces and means for depositing a fluid in said receptacles in said receptacle holder as it is moved step by step from said first row of receptacle holders to said second row of spaces.

2. A sample collector comprising a rectangular base, spaces arranged on said base in a first row and a second row for receptacle holders, rectangular elongated receptacle holders arranged in a first row and a second row on said base in all of said spaces excepting two, each receptacle holder containing a plurality of open receptacles arranged in a row, means for moving a receptacle holder in a step by step movement from one end position in the first row of receptacle holders to a vacant space in one end position in said second row of spaces, means for moving a receptacle holder step by step from the other end position of said second row of receptacle holders to a vacant space at the other end position of said first row of spaces, means for moving each row of receptacle holders separately in the longitudinal direction thereof and means for depositing a fluid in each of said receptacles in each of said receptacle holders as it is moved step by step from one row of receptacle holders to a vacant position in a row of spaces.

3. A sample collector as defined in claim 2 in which the two named means for moving receptacle holders step by step operate synchronously and the means for moving the rows of receptacle holders longitudinally thereof operate synchronously in opposite directions.

4. A sample collector comprising a rectangular base, spaces arranged in a first row and a second row on said base for receptacle holders, rectangular elongated receptacle holders arranged in a first row and a second row on said base in all of said spaces excepting one vacant end space in said second I'OW of spaces, a test tube rack carried by each receptacle holder, test tubes carried in each test tube rack, means for moving a receptacle holder from one end position in said first row of receptacle holders to said vacant end space in said second row of spaces in a step by step movement, means for moving each row of receptacle holders separately in the longitudinal direction thereof, means for moving a receptacle holder from the opposite end position in said second row of receptacle holders to a vacant end space at the opposite end of said first row of spaces and means for depositing a fluid in said test tubes as said receptacle holders are moved step by step from said first row of receptacle holders to said second row of spaces.

5. A sample collector comprising a rectangular base, spaces arranged on said base in a first row and a second row for receptacle holders, rectangular elongated receptacle holders arranged in a first row and a second row on said base in all of said spaces excepting two, a test tube rack carried by each receptacle holder, test tubes carried by each test tube rack, means for moving a receptacle holder in a step by step movement from one end position in the first row of receptacle holders to a vacant space in one end position in said second row of spaces, means for moving a receptacle holder step by step from the other end position of said second row of receptacle holders to a vacant space at the other end position of said first row of spaces, means for moving each row of receptacle holders separately in the longitudinal direction thereof and means for depositing a fluid in each of said test tubes as said receptacle holders are moved step by step from one row of receptacle holders to a vacant position in a row of spaces.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,246,454 11/1917 Newmark. 1,738,039 12/1929 Cope. 1,837,605 12/1931 Baker 198-85 2,652,162 9/1953 Auger. 2,846,087 8/1958 Nilson. 2,903,120 9/1959 Thomas.

HUGO O. SCHULZ, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1738039 *Mar 29, 1928Dec 3, 1929Electric Furnace CoContinuous furnace
US1837605 *Jun 29, 1926Dec 22, 1931David S BakerApparatus for handling materials
US2652162 *Jul 30, 1947Sep 15, 1953Harold AugerPower transmission mechanism in storage equipment
US2846087 *Jul 16, 1954Aug 5, 1958Nyby Bruk AbArrangement for the parking of motor-cars
US2903120 *Apr 25, 1957Sep 8, 1959Edward J Skinner LtdPlanetary transfer machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3319769 *Apr 16, 1965May 16, 1967Baird Atomic IncRadiation detection
US3330102 *Mar 26, 1965Jul 11, 1967Black & Decker Mfg CoPivoted index latch for lawn trimmer-edger
US3418084 *Oct 27, 1966Dec 24, 1968Instrumentation Specialties CoRectangular fraction collector
US3422268 *Dec 29, 1965Jan 14, 1969Karl Heinz MeinigRadiation detecting device
US3809208 *Jun 12, 1972May 7, 1974W ShieldsApparatus for advancing articles relative to filling and sealing devices
US4040533 *Jan 21, 1976Aug 9, 1977U.S. Philips CorporationTransport device for test sample carriers
US4454939 *Dec 15, 1981Jun 19, 1984Beckman Instruments, Inc.Apparatus for transporting sample holders
US4488633 *Dec 15, 1981Dec 18, 1984Beckman Instruments, Inc.Apparatus for transporting sample holders
US4584275 *Jul 30, 1982Apr 22, 1986Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Incubator
US4710122 *Mar 7, 1986Dec 1, 1987Villanueva Eliseo HMachine for manufacturing flat bodies in a continuous line
US4972937 *Feb 9, 1989Nov 27, 1990Product Suppliers AgApparatus for transporting articles
US5046539 *May 26, 1989Sep 10, 1991The Rockefeller UniversityAutomatic fluid dispenser for multi-welled dish
US5232081 *Jul 23, 1991Aug 3, 1993Toa Medical Electronics Co., Ltd.Sampler for many samples and sample rack start/stock unit
US5435686 *Feb 17, 1994Jul 25, 1995Sterling Systems, Inc.Bearing race hardening line
US5736102 *Feb 21, 1996Apr 7, 1998Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.Test sample positioning system
US5762874 *Mar 14, 1997Jun 9, 1998Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.Drives for positioning a sample holder, pans, rotation, shafts, paddle slides and supports, motors for rotation and endless belts
US5798084 *Mar 14, 1997Aug 25, 1998Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.Test sample positioning system
US5853667 *Sep 22, 1997Dec 29, 1998Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.Test sample positioning system
US5897835 *Mar 14, 1997Apr 27, 1999Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.System comprising sample tray moveable within testing machine, removable cassette having slots for receiving cards and test tube holders arranged in registry
US6059229 *Mar 11, 1998May 9, 2000Fuselage Engineering Services, Ltd.Compact storing and retrieving apparatus particularly useful for aircraft
DE102009033273A1Jul 9, 2009Jan 27, 2011AJ Cybertron Gesellschaft für Laborautomationssysteme mbHDevice for transporting and storing e.g. rack, has base unit including two sub-units that are connected with each other, where each sub-unit is provided with longitudinal-and transverse drives with associated controller
EP0160458A2 *Apr 17, 1985Nov 6, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaAn automatic chemical analyzing apparatus
WO2003049861A1 *Dec 9, 2002Jun 19, 2003Dakocytomation Denmark AsExtendable segmented sample carrier system
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/130, 198/434, 198/465.2, 198/736, 198/720
International ClassificationB25H3/00, B01L9/00, B01L9/06, G01N35/02
Cooperative ClassificationG01N35/026, B25H3/003, B01L9/06
European ClassificationG01N35/02E, B25H3/00B, B01L9/06