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Publication numberUS3221945 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1965
Filing dateApr 2, 1965
Priority dateApr 2, 1965
Publication numberUS 3221945 A, US 3221945A, US-A-3221945, US3221945 A, US3221945A
InventorsDavis Jr George B
Original AssigneeDavis Jr George B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid dispenser
US 3221945 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 7, 1965 G. B. DAVIS, JR

FLUID DISPENSER 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 2, 1965 INVENT OR Dec. 7, 1965 G. B. DAVIS, JR 3,221,945

FLUID DISPENSER Filed April 2, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Dec. 7, 1965 G. B. DAVIS, JR 3,221,945

FLUID DISPENSER Filed April 2, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR United States Patent 3,221,945 FLUID DISPENSER George B. Davis, .Ir., 7512 Marbury Road, Bethesda, Md. Filed Apr. 2, 1965, Ser. No. 444,971 Claims. (Cl. 222193) This invention relates generally to medication dispensers of the squeeze bottle type used extensively for the treatment of nasal and sinus infections and wherein as the resilient walls of the dispenser are compressed, a mixture of air and medication is directed from the discharge nozzle thereof in the form of an atomized spray. The present device is an improvement over that issued to me under Patent 3,176,883.

With dispensers of this type wherein medication is applied by insertion of the atomizing nozzle thereof within the nasal passage or" the person being treated, there is a tendency, after discharging the medication by compressing the walls of the receptacle, to begin releasing the pressure upon the receptacle before the discharge nozzle has been completely withdrawn from the nasal passage. When such occurs, a portion of the liquid dispensed along with nasal mucus is drawn back into the dispenser with the returning air to contaminate the entire contents of the device. It is not uncommon, particularly in cases where children are free to use such devices, that the liquid contents of such dispenser actually increases with use. Even when used exactly as directed, the air turbulence within the nasal passage during the spraying procedure is sufficient to carry infectious bacteria to the surface of the nozzle adjacent to the discharge opening to be drawn back into the dispenser with the returning air as pressure upon the receptacle is released.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved medication dispenser of the resilient wall squeeze bottle type wherein as the walls of the dispenser are compressed, a mixture of air and medication is directed from the nozzle portion of the device in the form of an atomized spray and as the dispenser walls are released, valve means operate to close the discharge nozzle thereof to effect air return to the dispenser by way of a separate air return passage located remotely to the discharge nozzle.

A further object of this invention is to provide an atomizing spray dispenser of the resilientwall squeeze bottle type wherein a three way valve system controls fluid flow from and into the receptacle with the said valve system forming a part of the nozzle portion of the device thereby permitting the nozzle assembly to be readily used with various sizes and shapes of resilient receptacles without alteration or modification of the latter.

A still further object of the present device is to provide a fluid controlling dispenser nozzle that is simple in structure, cheap to manufacture yet reliable to a high degree.

Other features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reading the following description while referring to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side View in elevation of the fluid dispenser shown as partly cutaway to better illustrate the arrangement of the fluid controlling valve therein.

FIGURE 2 is a cross sectional view through the cap and nozzle assembly of the device.

FIGURE 3 is a cross sectional view of the nozzle housing as taken along plane 3-3.

FIGURE 4 is a cross sectional view partly in elevation of the fluid discharge valve of the assembly.

FIGURE 5 is a cross sectional view partly in elevation of an alternate form of fluid discharge valve as used in the device.

FIGURE 6 is an elevational view along line 66 looking down upon the bottom plate of the fluid discharge valve and showing in cross section the valve stem as secured within the splined port within the plate.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view cutaway of an alternate form of air return valve of the nozzle assembly.

FIGURE 8 is a cross sectional view partly in elevation of an alternate form of the device.

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing the formation of the lower end of the air return valve flange and its operative relation with respect to the inner flange portion of the nozzle housing.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIGURE 1 thereof, the device of the present invention is shown as including a resilient receptacle member 4 whereupon is threaded a cover member 5. The corner of the receptacle is shown cutaway to disclose the arrangement therein of the fluid discharge valve assembly generally designated 6 as positioned beneath the fluid 7 partially filling the receptacle.

Closing the filling opening 8 within the receptacle as by press fitting therein, FIGURE 2, is a nozzle assembly generally designated 9 that includes the three flow controlling valve elements of the device as will be more fully described as the description proceeds. The nozzle assembly 9 includes a housing member 10 formed preferably from one of the harder plastics such as polystyrene and wherein is provided a discharge port 11. Extending centrally through the housing and in close discharge adjacency to the discharge port 11 is a fluid discharge tube 12 that extends downwardly from the housing to terminate beneath the liquid 7 within the receptacle. Formed in the "housing and extending down along the sides of the .tube 12 are air discharge passages 13 that are shown to advantage in FIGURE 3. These ways or passages serve to communicate air from the receptacle to the discharge port 11 simultaneously with the discharge of fluid from the fluid supply tube 12 during operation of the device.

Closely fitted over the discharge tube 12 and pressed to seating position within the housing is an annular plug like member 14 wherein is formed one or more air discharge ports 15. This plug is preferably molwded from one of the more flexible plastics such as polyethylene. Ports 15 are normally closed by a resilient valve disk 3 interposed between the plug and housing and held snugly against the upper face of the plug by centrally located enlargements 16 formed on the radial ribs 17, provided upon the interface of the housing as at 10.

Depending from the plug 14 and forming an integral cast portion thereof, is a thinning tubular like flange 13 that is slightly larger in diameter at its lower edge than the inside diameter of the flange 19 resulting in the flange 18 bearing lightly in sealing relation against the inner edge of flange 19 in a manner to normally close off the air return passage into the receptacle by way of the port 20 formed in the housing. The flange 18, as shown in FIGURE 9, includes a turned back edge as at 21 thereby presenting a smooth sealing surface to the smooth inner face of the housing flange 19. The purpose of this structure is to prevent flash, frequently present upon the parting edge of such a thin, flexible casting, from interfering with the sealing surface of the valve portion that bears against the flange 19.

Pressed over the lower end of the fluid discharge tube 12 is a normally closed fluid discharge valve assembly 6, FIGURE 4. The valve is comprised of an annular body member 23 wherein is pressed to shouldering position a valve cover member 24. A centrally located port 25 through the cover is shown as closed by a circular resilient valve member 27. The valve is held in place upon the cover by means of a depending stud portion 28 thereof being held, as by press fitting, between inwardly projecting splines 29 provided within port 25. If desired the splines may be a molded part of the valve member 27. The outer periphery of the valve 27 rests lightly in seating relation against a raised surface 30 of the cover. A predetermined increase in pressure within the receptacle, as caused by a squeezing of the receptacle Walls, forces the valve edges upward from the seat allowing liquid to pass to the discharge nozzle port 11 by way of the liquid discharge tube 12. As the pressure within the receptacle reaches a near state of equilibrium, the valve 27 returns to its seat preventing the passage of liquid from the tube 12 back into the receptacle. The fluid valve of FIGURE 5 is substantially the same as that of FIGURE 4 varying only in the structure of the valve disk 32 and cover plate 33. In the variation of the device, the edges of the valve disk 32 is provided with thinning turned up edge 34 for the reason, as described in FIGURE 9, to present a better seal-ing surface to the valve seat of the cover plate. Fluid enters the valve by way of ports 36.

Describing briefly the operation of the device thus far disclosed, the liquid 7 to be dispensed is placed within the receptacle as required to occupy substantially half its volume. The nozzle assembly 9, as shown in FIGURE 2 including the fluid discharge valve 6 FIGURE 4 or 5, is pressed into seating position within the neck 8 of the receptable 4 as shown. All valves of the device are now in closed position. As pressure is applied to the outer surfaces of the receptable to collapse the walls thereof, the increasing pressure within the receptable opens valve members 3 and 27 causing a discharge of fluid and air from the discharge nozzle 11 in the form of an atomized spray.

Simultaneously with an increase in pressure within the receptacle, the valve flange 18 moves more forcefully against the inner wall of flange 19 to more positively seal off discharge from port 20. As the walls of the receptable are released, the resultant drop in pressure within the receptacle causes an instant closing of valves 3 and 27 with 2. simultaneously opening of the air supply valve by the flange 18 moving away from the flange 19 allowing air from port 20 to flow into the receptacle. This cycle is repeated each time the Walls of the receptable are compressed and released.

Normally the discharge port 11 and air return passages 20 are closed by the cap 5 as shown. The resilient nature of the cap being such as to move uniformly into seating position over these openings simultaneously as the cap is threaded into place upon the threaded neck of the receptacle as at 40.

FIGURE 7 shows an alternate form of the air intake valve wherein the valve flange 41 has a more positive flare than is shown by the valve flange 18 of FIGURE 2. This structure makes the valve flange 41 more responsive to slight pressure changes within the receptacle.

FIGURE 8 is a cross sectional view of an alternate form of nozzle assembly wherein the air discharge valve 45 is centrally secured as by press fitting at 46 within the plug member 47. The valve disk 45 is so molded that when mounted within the plug, the outer periphery of the valve presses lightly upon the valve seat as at 48. Air pressure applied to the under surface of the valve 'by way of ports 49 operates to lift the valve flange from the seat allowing the air to flow along grooves 13, FIGURE 6, to the dis charge port 11. The air return valve flange 50 is constructed substantially as described in FIGURE 7.

While herein has been illustrated and described certain preferred embodiments of the device, it will be readily understood that various changes in the construction, operation and characteristics of the parts may be resorted to without departing from either the spirit or scope of the invention as now claimed.

What I claim is:

1. A fluid dispenser of the character disclosed comprising a resilient walled receptacle for containing a quantity of liquid to be dispensed, a filling opening in said receptacle for admitting liquid thereto, a housing having thereon a depending flange portion for being received within said opening for closing the latter, said flange including a smooth inner face portion, means forming an air return passage into said receptacle, means forming at least one air return port through said housing with said port forming a part of said air return passage, a plug like member disposed in said housing and including a depending flexible flange portion yieldably bearing in sealing relation against the said smooth inner face of said housing flange in a manner to close said air return passage with said flange being operable to move from said housing flange to open said air return passage upon a predetermined drop in pressure within said receptable, means forming a discharge port in said housing and remotely located therein with respect to said air return port, means forming an air discharge passage from within said receptable to said discharge port, means forming an opening through said plug with said opening forming a part of said discharge passage, a valve member normally closing said plug opening and movable upon a predetermined increase in pressure within said receptable to move from said plug opening to allow passage of air from within said receptacle to said discharge port, means forming a liquid discharge passage from within said receptacle to said discharge port and comprised of a tubular member extending from within said receptacle to operative adjacency with said discharge port, valve means normally closing said liquid discharge passage and operative upon a predetermined increase in pressure within said receptable to pass liquid from said receptable to said discharge port.

2.. A fluid dispenser as claimed in claim 1 wherein the valve member normally closing the air discharge passage through said plug is in the form of a cast flexible disk secured centrally to the plug.

3. A fluid dispenser as claimed in claim 1 wherein the valve member normally closing said liquid passage is in the form of a cast flexible disk centrally secured in a manner to allow the free edges thereof to move from valve closed to valve open position.

4. An atomizing nozzle assembly for use in combination with a resilient walled receptacle of the squeeze bottle type comprising a housing having thereon a depending flange portion for being received within the filling opening of the receptacle, said flange including a smooth inner face, means forming an air return passage within said housing, means forming at least one air return port within the wall of said housing with said air return port forming a part of said air return passage, a plug member disposed in said housing and having thereon a flexible flange yield-ably bearing in sealing relation against the smooth inner face of said housing flange in a manner to close said air return passage said flexible flange being operable upon a predetermined increase in pressure applied thereto by way of said air return passage to separate from said housing flange allowing the passage of air through said air return passage, means forming a discharge port in said housing, means forming an air discharge passage to said discharge port, means forming at least one opening through said plug member with said opening forming a part of said air discharge passage, a flexible member interposed between said plug and housing and normally closing said air discharge passage, said flexible member being responsive to a predetermined increase in pressure within said plug opening to pass air from said opening to said discharge port, means forming a liquid discharge passage to said discharge port and comprised of a tube extending from beneath said housing into operative adjacency to said discharge port, a housing member inclosing the lower end of said tube, a closure for said housing member and having means forming therein an opening comprising a part of said liquid discharge passage, a valve member normally closing said liquid passage and movable upon a predetermined increase in pressure within said closure opening to pass liquid to said discharge port.

5. A fluid dispenser of the character disclosed comprising a resilient walled receptacle for containing a quantity of liquid, an opening in said receptacle, a housing having thereon a flange for being received within said opening for closing the latter and including a smooth inner face portion, means forming an air return passage into said receptacle, means forming at least one air return port through said housing with said port forming a port of said air return passage, a plug member disposes in said housing and including a flexible flange portion yieldably bearing against the said smooth inner face of said housing flange in a manner to close said air return passage, said flexible r mally closing said air discharge passage and operative upon a predetermined increase in pressure within said receptacle to open and pass air to said discharge port, means forming a liquid discharge passage to said discharge port, valve means normally closing said liquid discharge passage, said last named valve means being operable upon a predetermined increase in pressure within said receptacle to open and pass liquid to said discharge port.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,160,329 12/1964 =Radic et a1. 222212 X 3,176,883 4/1965 Davis 222-193 RAPHAEL M. IJUPO, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3160329 *Feb 26, 1963Dec 8, 1964Radic FrankDispensing device
US3176883 *Apr 15, 1963Apr 6, 1965Davis Jr George BFluid dispenser
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3401845 *Jul 22, 1966Sep 17, 1968Cervello IndDispensing cap for atomizers
US3409181 *Jul 18, 1966Nov 5, 1968Lehmann Kenneth GSqueeze bottle dispenser
US3474936 *May 29, 1967Oct 28, 1969Mcdonnell John ESqueeze bottle dispenser
US3963150 *May 21, 1974Jun 15, 1976Vca CorporationPuff-discharge squeeze bottle
US4273272 *Nov 13, 1979Jun 16, 1981William B. AndersonLiquid dispenser
US4513891 *Apr 15, 1982Apr 30, 1985Sterling Drug Inc.Spray dispensing container and valve therefor
US4603794 *Mar 29, 1985Aug 5, 1986Battelle Development CorporationPressure multiplying dispenser
US5240149 *May 10, 1991Aug 31, 1993Perfect-Valois Ventil GmbhClosure cap
US5301845 *Oct 29, 1992Apr 12, 1994Labonte Jean PierreLiquid measuring and dispensing container
US6672479 *Feb 4, 2002Jan 6, 2004Taisai Kako Co., Ltd./Nihon TenganyakuClosing structure of a dispensing container
US8292129Jan 13, 2010Oct 23, 2012Ing. Erich Pfeiffer GmbhDispensing device
US8366681 *Nov 9, 2010Feb 5, 2013Mark CarpenterHigh flow volume nasal irrigation device and method for alternating pulsatile and continuous fluid flow
US8657794Oct 8, 2010Feb 25, 2014Skylab Development, Inc.High flow volume nasal irrigation device and method for alternating pulsatile and continuous fluid flow
US20110087188 *Nov 9, 2010Apr 14, 2011Mark CarpenterHigh Flow Volume Nasal Irrigation Device and Method for Alternating Pulsatile and Continuous Fluid Flow
EP2210674A2 *Dec 18, 2009Jul 28, 2010Ing. Erich Pfeiffer GmbHApplication device
WO1993017938A1 *Feb 25, 1993Sep 16, 1993American Sterilizer CoVented, non-reusable, multi-dose cartridge
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/633, 222/211, 222/212, 222/196.1
International ClassificationA61M11/00, B05B11/04, B05B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2011/008, A61M11/00, B05B11/0059, B05B11/043
European ClassificationA61M11/00, B05B11/04D1, B05B11/00B6