Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3222213 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1965
Filing dateDec 28, 1962
Priority dateDec 28, 1962
Also published asCA720079A, CA885447A
Publication numberUS 3222213 A, US 3222213A, US-A-3222213, US3222213 A, US3222213A
InventorsClark Salem T
Original AssigneeUnion Carbide Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rinsing formulation
US 3222213 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,222,213 RINSING FORMULATION Salem T. Clark, Grand Island, N.Y., assignor to Union Carbide Corporation, a corporation of New York No Drawing. Filed Dec. 28, 1962, Ser. No. 247,831 5 Claims. (Cl. 117119.6)

This invention relates to preparations for treating cleaned surfaces. In one aspect, this invention relates to emulsified formulations for rinsing previously cleaned automobiles.

Automobiles and the like are comm-only washed and cleaned with highly alkaline built detergents or anionic detergents. A very good cleaning action and effective removal, of grease spots can be achieved in this manner. After application of the detergent the automobile finish is rinsed and dried in the conventional manner, i.e., with a cloth or by means of an air blast.

It is an object of the present invention to provide formulations that facilitate the rinsing and drying of cleaned surfaces.

It is another object of this invention to provide formulations that deposit a water-repellent film on the treated surfaces.

Still further objects will readily present themselves to one skilled in the art upon reference to the ensuing specification and claims.

These objects are achieved by an oil-in-water emulsion which contains effective amounts of an organic cationic surfactant, an emulsifiable mineral oil, and water. Optionally, an organic non-ionic surfactant can be added to the formulation inorder to promote uniform deposition of a water-repellent film.

The present formulations possess what is referred to in the art as a fast water break. This property manifests itself as a heading of water droplets on the treated surface during and after application of the formulation. When the treated surface is dried, the water droplets can be removed by the relatively simple expedient of blowing air over the surface. As compared to cleaned but untreated surfaces an air blast of much lower intensity is required for drying a surface.

The primary ingredients of the formulation of this invention are a cationic surfactant and an emulsifiable mineral oil. The cationic surfactant emulsifies the mineral oil in water, thereby forming an oil-in-water emulsion. Upon application to a cleaned surface these primary ingredients substantively plate out on the surface and deposit a water-repellent film on the latter. The nonionic surfactant is believed to promote the plating out of a more nearly uniform water-repellent film and its presence in the formulation is preferred for this reason.

The broad group of compounds known in the art as surfactants is further broken down into three distinct ca-tegoriesnon-ionic surfactants, cationic surfactants, and anionic surfactants. The non-ionic surfactants do not ionize in water and are long molecules which on one end are hydrophilic and lipophobic and on the other end hydrophobic and lipophilic. The cationic surfactants and the anionic surfactants ionize in water to provide charged ions of long molecular structure. In cationic surfactants the hydrophobic lipophilic end is on the posi-- active epoxides such as propylene oxide and the like, and the quaternary ammonium salts of fatty amines having at least one alkyl substituent containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms such as fatty amine acetates, fatty amine chlorides, fatty amine bromides and the like.

Typical illustrative nitrogen-containing compounds which are the reaction products of long-chain fatty acids containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with alkylene polyamines are 1-(Z-aminoethyl)-2-heptadecenyl2-imidazoline, 1-(2-aminoethyl) 2-heptadecadienyl-2-imidazoline, and the like.

Typical reaction products of long-chain fattyacids containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with alkylol amines are 1-(2-hydroxyethyl) 2 heptadecenyl Z-imidaz-oline, 1-(Z-hydroxyethyl)-2-heptadecadienyl-Z-imidazoline, and the like.

Typical reaction products of long-chain fatty acids containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with ammonia are octadecylamide, hexadecylamide, docosylamide, octylamide, and the like.

Typical condensation products of a primary fatty amine with an alkylene oxide or the like are the N,N-di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-octadecylamines, the N,N- di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-heptadecy1amines, the N,N-di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-hexadecylamines, the N,N-di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-tetradecylamines, the N,N-di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-dodecylamines, and the like.

Typical quaternary ammonium salts are the coconut oil quaternary amine acetates, octadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, octadecylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride, hexadecyldimethylethylammonium bromide, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, and the like.

Preferred cationic surfactants for the instant formulalations are mixtures of nitrogen-containing compounds which are the reaction products of fatty acids containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with ethylene polyamines and condensation products of a primary fatty amine with ethylene oxide wherein the mole ratio of ethylene oxide to fatty amine is from about 4 to about 7.

Particularly preferred cationic surfactant is a mixture of 1 (Z-aminoethyl)-2-heptadecenyl-Z-imidazoline, 1-(2- aminoethyl) 2 heptadecadienyl-Z-imidazoline, and condensation products of tallow amines with ethylene oxide in a mole ratio of ethylene oxide to tallow amines of about 5.

Emulsifiable mineral oils suitable for the formulations of the present invention are the paraffinic and the naphthenic mineral oils having a viscosity in the range from about 20 to about 200 Saybolt Universal seconds (SUS) at F. A viscosity below about 20 SUS results in a less durable coating on the treated surface, and viscosity above about 200 SUS causes smear and promotes emulsion instability.

Paraffin oils within the aforesaid viscosity range and particularly those having a viscosity in the range from about 70 to about 100 SUS at 100 F. are preferred in the instant formulations.

By the term non-ionic surfactant as used herein and in the appended claims is meant an organic compound of a relatively high molecular weight and which consists of a hydrophobic portion to which is attached a solubilizing or hydrophilic portion containing groups such as ether links (-C-O-C), hydroxyl groups (OH), carbonyloxy groups and the like. With very few exceptions the non-ionic surfactants contain at least one hydroxyl group.

Specifically contemplated within the above definition are surfactants having as the hydrophilic moiety one or more chains containing one or more alkyleneoxy groups. These surfactants have the general formula wherein R is the hydrophobic portion of an aliphatic alcohol containing from about 8 to about 22 carbon atoms or an alkylated phenol containing from about 4 to about 22 carbon atoms in the alkyl group thereof, Y is an alkyleneoxy chain, H is a hydrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom of the alkyleneoxy chain, and y is an integer from 1 to about 6, and preferably from 1 to 4.

Typical aliphatic alcohols are octyl alcohol, nonyl alcohol, decyl alcohol, coco alcohol (a mixture of C to C alcohols), dodecyl alcohol, oleyl alcohol, tallow alcohol (a mixture of C to C alcohols), octadecyl alcohol, 2,6,8-trimethyl-4-nonyl alcohol, and the like.

Typical alkylated phenols are butylphenol, pentylphenol, hexylphenol, octylphenol, nonylphenol, dodecylphenol, hexadecylphenol, octadecylphenol, nonadecylphenol, and the like.

By the term alkyleneoxy chain as used herein and in the appended claims is meant a chain containing one or more alkyleneoxy groups which are divalent alkylene groups such as methylene, ethylene, propylene, butylene, and the like, bonded to an oxygen atom in a manner such that one of the valences of the alkyleneoxy group is from an oxygen atom and the other is from a carbon atom. Typical alkyleneoxy groups are methyleneoxy (--CH O-), ethyleneoxy (C H O), propyleneoxy (C H O), butyleneoxy (C H O), and the like.

Preferred non-ionic surfactants for the instant formulations are the polyalkylene glycol ethers containing from about 4 to about 80 moles of alkylene oxide. Illustrative preferred non-ionic surfactants are the nonlyphenyl polyethylene glycol ethers containing about 4 moles of ethylene oxide, the trimethylnonyl polyethylene glycol ethers containing about 6 moles ethylene oxide, the nonylphenyl polyethylene glycol ethers containing about 7 moles of ethylene oxide, mixed polyalkylene glycol ethers containing about 60 moles of a mixture of ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide in a mole ratio of about 2:1, and the like.

In a concentrated formulation, i.e., a rinsing concentrate, the cationic surfactant is present usually in an amount in the range from about 1 to about 20 percent by weight of the concentrate. Preferably the cationic surfactant is present in an amount in the range from about 5 to about 17 percent by weight.

The emulsifiable mineral oil is present in the formulation usually in an amount in the range from about 5 to about 35 percent by weight of the formulation, and preferably in an amount from about 10 to about 30 percent by weight. Oil in an amount in excess of about 12 percent by weight tends to decrease the stability of the emulsion.

The optional non-ionic surfactant is present in these formulations usually in an amount in the range up to about 15 percent by weight. The preferred range for the non-ionic surfactant is from about 3 to about 12 percent by weight.

The concentrated formulation is prepared by blending together at about room temperature a cationic surfactant and a mineral oil. To this blend water is added with agitation in predetermined amounts. This is the preferred method of compounding the formulation since an emulsion inversion is obtained in the process. An emulsion inversion improves dispersion and promotes the stability of the final product. If a non-ionic surfactant is also employed, it preferably is blended together with the cationic surfactant and the mineral oil prior to the addition of water.

When the aforesaid formulation is employed as a rinse after an automobile has been cleaned in the conventional manner, the concentrated formulation is extended with additional amounts of water in a ratio from about to about 5000 parts of water to 1 part of concentrate. The extended formulation is then sprayed onto or otherwise contacted with the cleaned surface until a water break" is observed. An automobile so treated can then be rapidly dried by means of an air blast, or the like.

Typical rinse formulations employing a mixture of cationic surfactants are illustrated below.

Formulation No. 1

Component:

Cationic surfactant A mixture of 1-(2-aminoethyl)-2-heptadecenyl-Z-imidazoline and 1-(2-amino- Weight percent ethyl)-2-heptadecadienyl-2-imidazoline 10 Ethylene oxide condensation products of primary fatty amines 5 15 Paraffin oil, 86 SUS 100 F. 25 Water 60 The above formulation can then be extended with additional water in a ratio of about 1000 parts of water to 1 part of the formulation and sprayed on a cleaned automobile finish prior to drying.

Formulation N 0. 2

Component:

Cationic surfactant-- A mixture of 1-(2-aminoethyl)-2-heptadecenyl-2-imidazoline and 1-(2-aminoethyl) 2 heptadecadienyl 2 imidazo- Weight percent The above formulation can then be extended with additional water in a ratio of about 1000 parts of water to 1 part of the formulation and sprayed on a cleaned automobile finish prior to drying.

The foregoing discussion and exemplary formulations are intended as illustrative of the present invention. Other modifications within the spirit and scope of this invention will readily present themselves to one skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A method for drying a cleaned surface which comprises applying thereto an oil-in-water emulsion consisting essentially of effective amounts of an organic cationic surfactant, an emulsifiable mineral oil, and water until :a beading of water droplets on said surface is observed, and thereafter removing said droplets from said surface; said amounts being effective to produce beading of water on the surface.

2. A method for drying a cleaned surface which comprises applying thereto an oil-in-water emulsion consisting essentially of effective amounts of an organic cationic surfactant, an emulsifiable mineral oil, and water until a beading of water droplets on said surface is observed, and thereafter subjecting said surface to a blast of air; said amounts being effective to produce beading of water on the surface.

3. A method for drying a cleaned surface which comprises applying thereto, until :a beading of Water droplets on said surface is observed, an emulsified formulation consisting of one part of a rinsing concentrate and from about 100 to about 5000 parts of water, and thereafter subjecting said surface to a blast of air; said rinsing concentrate being an oil-in-water emulsion consisting essentially of about 1 to about 20 percent by weight an organic cationic surfactant, about 5 to about 35 percent by weight an emulsifiable mineral oil, and the remainder water.

4. A method for drying a cleaned surface which comprises applying thereto, until a beading of water droplets on said surface is observed, an emulsified formulation consisting of one part of a rinsing concentrate and from about 100 to about 5000 parts of water, and thereafter subjecting said surface to a blast of air; said rinsing concentrate being an oil-in-water emulsion consisting essentially of about 1 to about 20 percent by weight an organic cationic surfactant, about 5 to about 35 percent by weight an emulsifiable mineral oil, up to about 15 percent by weight an organic non-ionic surfactant, and the remainder water.

5. A method for drying a cleaned surface which comprises applying thereto, until a beading of water droplets on said surface is observed, an emulsified formulation consisting of one part of a rinsing concentrate and about 1000 parts of water, and thereafter subjecting said surface to a blast of air; said rinsing concentrate being an oil-in-water emulsion consisting essentially of about 5 to about 17 percent by weight an organic cationic surfactant, about to about 30 percent by weight an emulsifiable mineral oil, about 3 to about 12 percent by weight an organic non-ionic surfactant, and the remainder water.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,428,364 10/ 1947 Frager. 2,440,157 4/1948 Rousseau. 2,780,554 2/1957 Lerner 106-271 X 2,952,637 9/1960 Bray et al. 252118 3,167,797 2/1965 Hergonson 134--123 X OTHER REFERENCES Ser. No. 230,336, Hutzenlaub et a1 (APC), published May 4, 1943.

Lesser Soap and Sanitary Chemicals, May 1951, pp. 31 and 32.

References Cited by the Applicant JOSEPH B. SPENCER, Primary Examiner.

RICHARD D. NEVIUS, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1401023 *Jan 26, 1921Dec 20, 1921Wilson Cora EllsworthComposition for cleaning and coating
US2141729 *May 8, 1937Dec 27, 1938Du PontPolishing composition
US2277788 *Aug 3, 1940Mar 31, 1942Du PontTreatment of textiles and composition useful therefor
US2295132 *Mar 22, 1940Sep 8, 1942Standard Oil CoPolish
US2349326 *Dec 31, 1938May 23, 1944Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpEmulsion
US2428364 *Sep 21, 1944Oct 7, 1947Max FragerProcess for providing rust free surfaces on ferrous metal parts
US2440157 *Aug 19, 1944Apr 20, 1948Minit Man IncDrier for motor vehicle washing and cleaning apparatus
US2442972 *Jan 23, 1941Jun 8, 1948Sidney M EdelsteinAqueous dispersions of electropositive materials
US2523281 *Sep 26, 1949Sep 26, 1950 automobile polish
US2780554 *Mar 23, 1950Feb 5, 1957Allied Home Products CorpWashing and waxing composition
US2952637 *Apr 29, 1958Sep 13, 1960Bray Oil CoCarburetor and engine cleaning composition
US2968621 *Jun 28, 1955Jan 17, 1961Sinclair Refining CoAcid-tolerating soluble oil composition
US3088158 *Mar 28, 1961May 7, 1963Union Carbide CorpCleaning and polishing sponge
US3167797 *May 23, 1962Feb 2, 1965Om Edwards Co IncApparatus for vehicle washing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3518099 *Jan 21, 1969Jun 30, 1970Holbus EdwardProtective coating for metal surfaces
US4015032 *Apr 28, 1975Mar 29, 1977Hanna Daniel CMethod of waxing cars
US4078105 *Feb 15, 1977Mar 7, 1978Akzona IncorporatedAutomobile rinsing formulations and process for using the same
US4493773 *Jan 27, 1984Jan 15, 1985The Procter & Gamble CompanyLow phosphate, softening laundry detergent containing ethoxylated nonionic, alkylpolysaccharide and cationic surfactants
US4547401 *Apr 23, 1984Oct 15, 1985Jack ShoreCleaning of surface of an object
US5391325 *Sep 29, 1993Feb 21, 1995Exxon Chemical Patents Inc.Non-toxic biodegradable emulsion compositions for use in automatic car washes
US6462009Apr 14, 2000Oct 8, 2002Capital Chemical CompanyHydrophobizing microemulsions which improve the protection, drying rate and shine of surfaces
US6780828Jun 27, 2002Aug 24, 2004Capital Chemical CompanyHydrophobizing microemulsions which improve the protection, drying rate and shine of surfaces
US7140405Jun 28, 2004Nov 28, 2006Relevant Engineering DevelopmentMixing apparatus
US7388033Sep 21, 2004Jun 17, 2008Capital Chemical Co.Amine-functionalized polyisobutylenes for improved hydrophobizing microemulsions
US7530373Jun 28, 2004May 12, 2009R. Lewis Technologies, Inc.Mixing apparatus and methods using the same
US8210215Dec 11, 2008Jul 3, 2012R. Lewis Technologies, Inc.Mixing apparatus and methods of using the same
US8905088Jun 5, 2012Dec 9, 2014R. Lewis Technologies, Inc.Mixing apparatus and methods of using the same
US8980341Aug 29, 2011Mar 17, 2015Clarke Mosquito Control Products, Inc.Insecticidal compositions and methods of using the same
US9220273Mar 13, 2015Dec 29, 2015Clarke Mosquito Control Products, Inc.Insecticidal compositions and methods of using the same
US20030162683 *Jun 27, 2002Aug 28, 2003Capital Chemical CompanyHydrophobizing microemulsions which improve the protection, drying rate and shine of surfaces
US20040261887 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 30, 2004William LewisMixing apparatus and methods using the same
US20040264295 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 30, 2004William LewisMixing apparatus
US20040266658 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 30, 2004Lenhart John G.Cleaning formulations and methods for manufacturing the same
US20050014672 *Jul 18, 2003Jan 20, 2005Shoaib ArifRinse aid additive and composition containing same
US20060063844 *Sep 21, 2004Mar 23, 2006Andras NagyAmine-functionalized polyisobutylenes for improved hydrophobizing microemulsions
US20060223736 *Mar 30, 2006Oct 5, 2006R. Lewis Technologies, Inc.Dye and scent pouches and methods of making the same
US20110197465 *Feb 16, 2010Aug 18, 2011Ecolab Usa Inc.Methods for water removal
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/348, 366/101, 366/162.1
International ClassificationC11D1/38, C11D3/43
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/43, C11D1/38
European ClassificationC11D1/38, C11D3/43