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Publication numberUS3223153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1965
Filing dateMay 21, 1962
Priority dateMay 21, 1962
Publication numberUS 3223153 A, US 3223153A, US-A-3223153, US3223153 A, US3223153A
InventorsClyde S Simpelaar
Original AssigneeModine Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fin and tube type heat exchanger
US 3223153 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1965 c. s. slMPELAAR 3,223,153

FIN AND TUBE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER Filed May 21. 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Dec. 14, 1965 c. s. slMPELAAR FIN AND TUBE TYPE HEAT EXGHANGER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 21, 1962 United States Patent O 3,223,153 FIN AND TUBE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER Clyde S. Simpelaar, Racine, Wis., assigner to Modine Manufacturing Company, a corporation of Wisconsin Filed May 21, 1962, Ser. No. 196,114 Claims. (Cl. 165-152) This is a continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 115,234, tiled June 6, 1961, and now Patent No. 3,106,958.

This invention relates to a heat exchanger particularly of the iin and tube type wherein one fluid is confined within a conduit or tube which has attached thereto spaced tins for heat exchange with another fluid passing around and between the tubes and fins.

In many types of heat exchangers it is customary to provide conduits and specifically tubes for one fluid to flow therethrough and spaced ns in contact with these conduits between which another uid ows in order to provide heat transfer between the two fluids. In my above copending application it has been proposed to form these tins by bending a continuous metal sheet which may be in strip form in a serpentine or sinuous arrangement with adjacent portions of the metal sheet constituting the spaced ns and arranged against the outer surfaces of the fluid conduit in order to provide heat transfer therebetween and thus between the fluid within the conduit and the iluid pas-sing between the tins.

One of the features of the present invention is to prov-ide a heat exchanger structure comprising a sinuous continuous metal sheet arranged in adjacent pleats to form fins connected in series by side fold areas in which these fold areas have openings for permitting fluid flow through the openings to between the tins with the heat exchanger structure also including means forming aligned iin openings for receiving the fluid tubes.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description of certain embodiments thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. Of the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary elevational view illustrating the general type of heat exchanger with which the invention is concerned.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of a metal sheet for forming one embodiment of the tins,

FIGURE 3 is Va sectional view through the embodiment of FIGURE 2 with spacer projections omitted for simplicity of illustration.

FIGURE 4 is a View similar to FIGURE 3 illustrating the folding of the metal sheet into adjacent pleats preparatory to forming the iin structure with spacer projections omitted for simplicity of illustration.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary sectional view through a completed heat exchanger utilizing the fin structure of this first embodiment.

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational view of the heat exchanger of FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 .showing a metal sheet used in forming a second embodiment of the iin structure.

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but showing a metal sheet used in producing a third embodiment of the iin structure.

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view illustrating the fold form of the embodiment of FIGURE 8.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional View taken substantially along line lil-10 of FIGURE 9. j

FIGURE 1-1 is a View similar to FIGURE 8 but illustrating a fourth embodiment of the invention.

FIGURE 12 is a view similar to FIGURE 9 but employing the fin structure of this fourth embodiment.

FIGURE 1 illustrates the type of heat exchanger uti- Patented Dec. 14, 1965 liz-ing the present invention. Such a heat exchanger has many uses such as for condensers for refrigeration systems. The heat exchanger comprises a plurality of fluid tubes 20 connected by closely spaced tins 2'1. In the type of fn structure contemplated, these ns are made up of adjacent pleats of a metal sheet or strip folded .to lie substantially parallel to each other so that the adjacent pleats constituting the fins are connected in series by side fold areas 22.

In 'the embodiment of FIGURES 2-6 inclusive the metal sheet 23 is provided with parallel series of aligned but spaced slots 24 with the distance between two adjacent set-s of aligned slots 24 determining the width of the n. Between each adjacent pair of series of aligned slots is arranged a series of openings 25 for receiving the tubes 26 of this rst embodiment. Each opening in this embodiment is surrounded by an annular ange 27 that is struck from the sheet metal.

Between the openings 25 and the slot-s 24 are projections 28 struck from the sheet metal and arranged in pairs with one projection of each pair extending away from one side of the metal sheet and the other projection extending away from the other side.

In order to produce the adjacent pleats constituting 'the spaced tins the metal sheet 23 is folded as illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4 with the parallel series of aligned slots 24 determining the fold lines. As can be seen in FIGURE 2, adjacent slots 24 are connected by relatively thin sections 29 of the sheet metal and these become the relatively narrow arcuate connections of one pleat or fin to its neighbor. Because these sections 29 are thin, folding is easily accomplished at the sections so that, in effect, each series of slots 24 determines a fold area for the sheet metal. As can be seen in FIGURE 5 the adjacent tins 30 which are the same, of course, as the pleats are spaced from each other by the projections 28. When the metal sheet is thusly folded the openings 25 are in aligned series for receiving the fluid conduit tubes 26.

As can be seen from the above description the provision of spaced series of slots 24 aids in determining the fold areas for folding lthe metal sheet in sinuous fashion so that the adjacent pleats form the tins. As the adjacent tins are connected only by the relatively narrow metal sections 29, the folding is relatively easy. Furthermore, adjustments are easily made in the fold because the folding takes place at these narrow sections to align each set or series of tube openings 25 for receiving the tubes 26. A very important function of these slots 24 besides locating the fold areas is to permit fluid flow through the slots into the spaces between the tins and around the tubes 26. Thus, it has always Ibeen possible to attain lluid flow, of course, between the tins at right angles to the plane of the View of FIGURE 1, for example, and parallel to the tins. Now, in addition to this direction of flow, fluid ilow is also achieved in additional directions through the slots (which would be at right angle-s to the plane of FIGURE 6) with the folded arrangement providing substantially no interference to this flow.

The provision of the slots 24 has the further advantage of providing openings for drainage of liquid such as condensate from an evaporator surface or cooling water from a condenser. This is particularly important where the heat exchanger would be so constructed that thefold areas are on the bottom. It is preferred for eflicient fluid ow between the tins that the length of each slot 24 be at least of the fin width.

The embodiment shown in FIGURE 7 is quite similar to the embodiment of FIGURES 2-6 inclusive. In FIG- URE 7, however, each s-lot or opening 31 is of generally diamond shape with the long axis of each set of diamonds being aligned so that the sharper points 32 of the diamonds are adjacent each other. In all other respects, this embodiment is the same as the previous embodiment. In this construction the diamond formation locates somewhat more precisely the fold line which will be essentially the aligned long axes of each set of diamond slots.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 8, 9 and 10 aligned slits 33 are used instead of the previous slots. Each set of slits is aligned with one end of one slit being spaced from the adjacent end of the other in order to provide the connecting bridges or metal sections 34 which will connect the adjacent pleats or ns 35. The metal sections 34 are defined on each side by substantially parallel short slits 36 so that one slit 33 and its two end transverse short slits 36 form an H. In this embodiment the fins are formed by folding the metal sheet into pleats as in the previous embodiments. Here, however, the fin edges 37 formed by the sets of slits 33 and 36 lie -in the planes of the respective ns 35 and are spaced from each other as shown in FIGURES 9 and 10.

The embodiment of FIGURES 8-10 has the advantages previously described and in addition has the advantage of conserving useful fin metal for heat transfer purposes. Thus, in this embodiment the slits preserve all of the metal and do not eliminate metal as is true of the slots 24 and 31 of the previous embodiments. Thus, a higher proportion of metal is available for heat transfer purposes. These resulting slit edges 37 serve as liquid drip edges such as for dripping condensate when used as a part of a condenser for hot refrigerant.

The embodiment of FIGURES 11 and 12 is similar to the embodiment of FIGURES 8, 9 and 10 in that slits 38 are used instead of the previously described slots. However, in the embodiment of FIGURES 11 and 12, each long slit 38 intersects an opening 39 for receiving tubes similar to the tubes 26. In this last embodiment the arrangement of the fins and tubes is similar to that of my prior application mentioned above. Thus, when the metal sheet 40 is folded to form the n structure 41, as shown in FIGURE 12, the aligned openings 39 at each edge of the fin structure are adapted to receive approximately one-half of a tube similar to the tube 26. Then, another n structure can be placed on the opposite side of the tube in the manner shown in my above-mentioned prior application. This construction is possible here, as the connecting metal sections 42 that are constructed similarly to the connecting sec tions 29 of the first embodiment are located inwardly of the edges ofthe fins formed by the slits 38. Thus, the n structure 41 may be stacked with the slit edges of one stack against the slit edges of a similar stack without interference by the recessed curved connecting sections 42.

In all embodiments the iin structure of the heat exchanger is made by folding a metal sheet in alternate folds to provide adjacent pleats which constitute the plurality of tins. The folding is quite easily accomplished as the connecting portions of metal between the adjacent fins are relatively narrow sections. This has the added advantage of providing openings whether formed of slots where metal is actually removed or slits where the metal is cut for receiving additional lluids for the spaces between the ns. The metal sheet may be as wide or as narrow as desired to accommodate one coplanar set of tubes or a plurality of coplanar sets of tubes. Thus, in the portion of the structure shown in FIGURE 2 the n structure will accommodate a set of four tubes. Dilferent arrangements and different ways of bending may of course be used to produce any desired arrangement without departing from 4the principles of the invention. In the embodiment shown substantially all of the fold areas on one side of the iin structure are in one plane while those on the other side are in another parallel plane. The distances between these two planes have of course approximately the width of the fin.

Although the illustrated embodiments are for n structures each accommodating only one set of parallel tubes it is of course obvious that the fold areas as determined by the slots or slits or other openings may be arranged to provide as many passes of parallel tubes as desired. The single arrangement is illustrated for simplicity of illustration of the invention.

Having described my invention as related to the embodiments shown in the accompanying drawings, it is my intention that the invention be not limited by any of the details of description, unless otherwise specied,

but rather be construed broadly within its spirit andy scope as set out in the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. A fin and tube heat exchanger, comprising: a sinuous continuous metal sheet arranged in adjacent pleats constituting ns connected in series by side fold areas, said sheet having means forming elongated openings substantially along said fold areas for permitting high volume flow of fluid through said openings and between said fins; means form-ing aligned 1in openings; and a plurality of tubes in said n openings in heat transfer relationship With said ns.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said fold area opening forming means comprise cut out sections in said sheet.

3. The structure of claim 1 wherein said fold area opening forming means comprise slits in said sheet.

4. The structure of claim 1 wherein said tube receiving openings are in said alternate fold areas.

5. A 1in and tube heat exchanger, comprising: a sinuous continuous metal sheet arranged in adjacent pleats constituting ns having length and width connected in series by arcuately curved side fold areas and said fins being substantially parallel to each other, alternate fold areas being located on opposite sides of said n structure with those on one side being located substantially in a rst common plane and those on the opposite side being located substantially in a second common plane with the two planes being substantially parallel to each other, said sheet having means forming openings at said fold areas for permitting high volume flow of fluid through said openings and between said ns with said openings having a length along said fold areas of at least about of said n width and being arranged in alignment with one end of one opening spaced from the adjacent end of the next opening; means forming aligned fin openings; and a plurality of tubes in said fin openings in heat transfer relationship with said ns.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,119,761 6/1938 Wentworth 165-152 X 2,788,195 4/1957 Karmazin 165--151 X 2,948,054 8/1960 Kritzer 165-181 X 2,977,918 4/1961 Kritzer 165-181 X 2,994,123 8/1961 Kritzer 165-151 X FOREIGN PATENTS 201,934 11/ 1924 Great Britain.

ROBERT A` OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

CHARLES SUKALO, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2119761 *Jun 18, 1935Jun 7, 1938Clinton H WentworthHeat interchange device
US2788195 *Aug 29, 1952Apr 9, 1957John KarmazinCondenser and method of making same
US2948054 *Jun 14, 1956Aug 9, 1960Kritzer Richard WMethod of fabricating finned heat transfer tubing
US2977918 *Jul 5, 1957Apr 4, 1961Kritzer Richard WMethod of making heat transfer units
US2994123 *Jun 14, 1956Aug 1, 1961Kritzer Richard WMethod of forming heat transfer units
GB201934A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3309763 *Oct 29, 1964Mar 21, 1967Borg WarnerMethod for making a heat exchanger
US3337950 *Jan 18, 1965Aug 29, 1967Zenith Radio CorpMethod of assembling a television chassis
US3341925 *Jun 26, 1963Sep 19, 1967Gen Motors CorpMethod of making sheet metal heat exchangers with air centers
US3397741 *Feb 21, 1966Aug 20, 1968Hudson Engineering CorpPlate fin tube heat exchanger
US3437134 *Oct 24, 1965Apr 8, 1969Borg WarnerHeat exchanger
US3438433 *May 9, 1967Apr 15, 1969Hudson Eng CoPlate fins
US4141411 *Mar 3, 1976Feb 27, 1979Kalnin Igor MTubular heat exchanger
US4575326 *Dec 7, 1984Mar 11, 1986Tamaqua Cable Products CorporationApparatus for calibrating extruded material
US4881311 *May 26, 1988Nov 21, 1989Peerless Of America IncorporatedHeat exchanger assembly with integral fin unit
US8375584 *Feb 19, 2013Cpumate IncMethod for manufacturing large-area heat sink having heat-dissipating fins
US8453719 *Aug 28, 2006Jun 4, 2013Dana Canada CorporationHeat transfer surfaces with flanged apertures
US20080047696 *Aug 28, 2006Feb 28, 2008Bryan SperandeiHeat transfer surfaces with flanged apertures
US20110024087 *Jul 29, 2009Feb 3, 2011Kuo-Len LinHeat-dissipating fins, large-area heat sink having such heat-dissipating fins and method for manufacturing the same
DE102008011558A1 *Feb 28, 2008Jun 18, 2009GEA MASCHINENKüHLTECHNIK GMBHWärmetauscher
DE102008011558B4 *Feb 28, 2008Apr 1, 2010GEA MASCHINENKüHLTECHNIK GMBHWärmetauscher
EP0106480A2 *Sep 1, 1983Apr 25, 1984Unipart Group LimitedCooling fins for heat exchanger
EP0271319A2 *Dec 9, 1987Jun 15, 1988Peerless of America, IncorporatedMethod of making a heat exchanger assembly with integral fin units
EP1586844A1 *Dec 19, 2003Oct 19, 2005T.RAD Co,.LtdPlate fin for heat exchanger and heat exchanger core
WO2015088369A1 *Dec 11, 2013Jun 18, 2015Владимир Германович МАЗЕИНTemplate for radiator section of finned-tube radiator, radiator section made from said template, and radiator made of said section
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/152, 165/181, 165/DIG.502, 29/890.47
International ClassificationF28F1/32, B21D53/08
Cooperative ClassificationB21D53/085, Y10S165/502, F28F1/325
European ClassificationB21D53/08B, F28F1/32B